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Changing Wheels back to Clincher from Tubs.

I am looking for advice as to how i would go about, changing a wheelset, that has been used tubeless back to a clincher.
Cheers.

Posts

  • dj58dj58 Posts: 2,139
    edited 17 September
    Clarification needed please. Tubs, a tubular tyre has the inner tube enclosed in a closed tyre and is designed only to be glued on to a specific tubular rim profile. Tubeless tyre is an open tyre, similar to a standard clincher, though with a specific bead profile to seat a tubeless rim profile. Rims can be tubeless only or tubeless compatible, which can accept tubeless tyres or standard clincher tyres and inner tubes. Which do you have?
  • Thanks for the reply. I dont have the wheels as yet, the bike is on ebay and is set up `tubeless`, with Shwalbe one tyres. The rims are Hunt carbon 50mm deep, and according to their website, they can be run tubeless or with tubes. I think the shwalbe one tyres are only for tubeless. So, i would need new tyres and tubes. It is what the process would be, before they could be used with tubes.
  • mpattsmpatts Posts: 970
    Nothing special. Take off, clean out sealant, put tubes in.

    But I wouldn't, its a backwards step.
    Insert bike here:
  • Thanks for that. I`m the same with disc brakes, i like thinks simple.
    Cheers.
  • ... and it's not a step backwards...

    Tubeless would be a step forward if it didn't rely on liquid sealant, like in cars for example. As things stand, it is an alternative at best for those who are not very confident fixing a puncture
  • mpattsmpatts Posts: 970

    ... and it's not a step backwards...

    Tubeless would be a step forward if it didn't rely on liquid sealant, like in cars for example. As things stand, it is an alternative at best for those who are not very confident fixing a puncture

    As ever, Ugo speaks the truth.
    Insert bike here:
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 8,355
    Personally I'd stick with tubeless and here's a website to assist.
    https://thecycleclinic.co.uk/pages/tech-page
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • dj58dj58 Posts: 2,139
    To the OP, if you do switch to clinchers and inner tubes, remember to change the rim tape also. I had a puncture the other month caused by tubeless rim tape failing adjacent a spoke hole, cutting a hole in the inner tube.
  • dj58 said:

    To the OP, if you do switch to clinchers and inner tubes, remember to change the rim tape also. I had a puncture the other month caused by tubeless rim tape failing adjacent a spoke hole, cutting a hole in the inner tube.

    Thanks for that mate. appreciate it. So its a full clean up, new rim tape tube andtyre.
    Cheers.
  • oxoman said:

    Personally I'd stick with tubeless and here's a website to assist.
    https://thecycleclinic.co.uk/pages/tech-page

    Thanks for that, i will have a look.
    Cheers.
  • StillGoingStillGoing Posts: 5,207

    ... and it's not a step backwards...

    Tubeless would be a step forward if it didn't rely on liquid sealant, like in cars for example. As things stand, it is an alternative at best for those who are not very confident fixing a puncture

    Utter rubbish Ugo and you know it. Do you do this as click bait?

    I've no problem changing an inner tube or repairing one, but the simplicity of putting sealant in a tubeless tyre is a no brainer. More comfortable as can be run at lower pressures. Never had a puncture in 2 years of running them, or at least one I knew about. If the sealant doesn't fix it, a tyre worm certainly should. If the tyre worm doesn't, put an inner tube in. Luddite.
    I ride a bike. Doesn't make me green or a tree hugger. I drive a car too.
  • david37david37 Posts: 428

    ... and it's not a step backwards...

    Tubeless would be a step forward if it didn't rely on liquid sealant, like in cars for example. As things stand, it is an alternative at best for those who are not very confident fixing a puncture

    Utter rubbish Ugo and you know it. Do you do this as click bait?

    I've no problem changing an inner tube or repairing one, but the simplicity of putting sealant in a tubeless tyre is a no brainer. More comfortable as can be run at lower pressures. Never had a puncture in 2 years of running them, or at least one I knew about. If the sealant doesn't fix it, a tyre worm certainly should. If the tyre worm doesn't, put an inner tube in. Luddite.
    And i love waiting for twenty minutes whilst a tubeless user fafs and messes with worms then trys to work out how to put an inner tube in. Massive faff. Tubeless isnt there yet. Plus its heavier.
  • shortfallshortfall Posts: 2,795
    edited 18 September
    david37 said:

    ... and it's not a step backwards...

    Tubeless would be a step forward if it didn't rely on liquid sealant, like in cars for example. As things stand, it is an alternative at best for those who are not very confident fixing a puncture

    Utter rubbish Ugo and you know it. Do you do this as click bait?

    I've no problem changing an inner tube or repairing one, but the simplicity of putting sealant in a tubeless tyre is a no brainer. More comfortable as can be run at lower pressures. Never had a puncture in 2 years of running them, or at least one I knew about. If the sealant doesn't fix it, a tyre worm certainly should. If the tyre worm doesn't, put an inner tube in. Luddite.
    And i love waiting for twenty minutes whilst a tubeless user fafs and messes with worms then trys to work out how to put an inner tube in. Massive faff. Tubeless isnt there yet. Plus its heavier.
    There are undoubtedly people who struggle with tubeless and similarly some who take forever to change a tube.

    ETA
    Someone who can't stick a tyre worm in (which literally takes less than a couple of minutes) is probably the same person that can't replace a tube easily or patch at the side of the road. Why anyone would put a tube in a punctured tubeless tyre is beyond me.
  • davidofdavidof Posts: 2,371
    edited 18 September
    david37 said:



    And i love waiting for twenty minutes whilst a tubeless user fafs and messes with worms then trys to work out how to put an inner tube in. Massive faff. Tubeless isnt there yet. Plus its heavier.

    :-) I still remember the time my tubeless rear blew splurging white goo into the faces of the riders following me. I think they call that "the money shot".

    I stuck a tube in for the ride home but getting the tubeless valve off was a bit of a faff.

    I think that is the only tubeless puncture I've had but the rear was down to the canvas at the end.

    Takes me about a minute to change a tube though so I'm a bit ambivalent. Tubes are probably simpler at the end of the day. Oh you can run tubeless on lower pressures, they won't pinch flat, but you'll go slower.

    In the OPs case, if the wheels are set up and working with tubeless I'd stick with it if you can afford the tires going forward.
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 8,355
    Davidof, anyone who cannot fit a tyreworm in a few seconds is obviously short of a few chromosomes. Also anyone who can change a tube in less than 60 secs is fibbing. As to tubeless being slower and heavier that's not true either. If the rims are true tubeless and the tyres are tubeless and fitted correctly they will stay on the rim. Most of my tubeless wheels have very little goo as i run mine like a car tyre dry, just enough to seal them to the rim. Agree with your last statement to the OP though, if fitted and ok stick with them.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • StillGoingStillGoing Posts: 5,207
    david37 said:

    ... and it's not a step backwards...

    Tubeless would be a step forward if it didn't rely on liquid sealant, like in cars for example. As things stand, it is an alternative at best for those who are not very confident fixing a puncture

    Utter rubbish Ugo and you know it. Do you do this as click bait?

    I've no problem changing an inner tube or repairing one, but the simplicity of putting sealant in a tubeless tyre is a no brainer. More comfortable as can be run at lower pressures. Never had a puncture in 2 years of running them, or at least one I knew about. If the sealant doesn't fix it, a tyre worm certainly should. If the tyre worm doesn't, put an inner tube in. Luddite.
    And i love waiting for twenty minutes whilst a tubeless user fafs and messes with worms then trys to work out how to put an inner tube in. Massive faff. Tubeless isnt there yet. Plus its heavier.
    Anyone who can't put a tyre worm, in shouldn't be riding bikes for their own and everyone else's safety IMO. 2 years of tubeless, no punctures I'm aware of. Ridden over gravel and freshly cut hedgerow clippings. No issue removing a tubeless tyre either as I've done when replacing sealant from a different brand. Instant reseal too.
    I ride a bike. Doesn't make me green or a tree hugger. I drive a car too.
  • pilot_petepilot_pete Posts: 1,962
    But that’s not everyone’s tubeless experience SG.

    I’ve got a mate who has had his rear wheel back in the bike shop two or three times for a tubeless setup that just won’t stay inflated. They still haven’t sorted it - it goes pretty soft over about 70 miles....

    Got other friends who have had a nightmare trying to mount and remove tubeless tyres as they were so tight - the standards for rim and tyre bead just aren’t quite sorted yet and some combinations can be problematic.

    I’ve also witnessed 3 punctures that wouldn’t seal over the last few years; one a split that worms wouldn’t cure, another where the worm fitted, but was then blown out when he inflated it and a third that had a nail through the tyre, rim tape and rim! (Can’t blame that on tubeless!).

    So again, it’s not plain sailing for all tubeless users. When they work they are great, but when they don’t...

    PP
  • I had weird things happening with tubeless...
    When I used Hutchinson Sector on my commute to work and back on hot July days, they used to inevitably spray latex as the temperature rose in the afternoon. Never really understood why... I figured sealed punctures would reopen for some reason. It went on for a few days until eventually I binned them.
    Once I wrecked a chainring and had to walk back home... it was 25 degrees... the tyre began spraying latex... I wasn't even riding the damn bike!!

    Didn't have problems with Maxxis Padrone, but I could only buy them on Black Monday when the price for a pair went down to 50 quid from the normal 100 or so... a lot of planning involved

    And then someone earlier mentioned "the simplicity" of tubeless...

    I had to buy:

    1) An Airshot pump to sit the tyre, which worked most of the time, not always
    2) A Stans sealant injector to avoid making a right mess
    3) A regular supply of sealant to top up...
    4) Various sets of tubeless valves, which inevitably got jammed after a few months of use and had to be binned... some rims were happy with square base ones, other needed round ones... trial and error
    5) various rolls of grossly overpriced tubeless tape of different width for different rims (19, 21, 25... I had them all)

    We can argue about benefits, the marginally lower pressure for old folks with bad backs, the self healing of small punctures... the alleged and never proved lower rolling resistance... but simplicity is definitively not one of the benefits!



  • gethincerigethinceri Posts: 1,086
    edited 22 September
    Indeed, it's horses for courses and there will be good stories & bad.
    I recently fitted a Vittoria Rubino Pro on a Hunt Aerowide using only a Lezyne track pump. Added 60ml Doc Blue sealant through the valve using the nozzled little bottle supplied with the sealant, used a cloth to wipe the very small amount of spillage off the rim. The tyre loses about 10psi over 24 hours.
    Edit, I remove & replace sealant twice a year (10 mins per tyre), I've never had a puncture which didn't immediately seal, I've replaced rimtape once (because I tore it).
    Tubeless for about 3 years, I've bought 5 tyres including the originals, 5000 kms per year.
  • Indeed, it's horses for courses and there will be good stories & bad.
    I recently fitted a Vittoria Rubino Pro on a Hunt Aerowide using only a Lezyne track pump. Added 60ml Doc Blue sealant through the valve using the nozzled little bottle supplied with the sealant, used a cloth to wipe the very small amount of spillage off the rim. The tyre loses about 10psi over 24 hours.

    You maverick... using clinchers as tubeless was always a no go area...
  • gethincerigethinceri Posts: 1,086
    ? They are the tubeless tyre.
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