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Group set mileage

I have the chance to buy a 12 speed record group set from a mate. The mileage is about 10k. Is this considered high mileage on a group set like this TIA

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  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    Depending on how it's been used and looked after.

    10k of wet rides are a lot harsher than dry rides.

    I expect that some bits might have been replaced ? How are the chainrings looking ?
  • Not many folk are going to be riding a 12-speed Record equipped bike on lots of wet rides.

    10k miles or 10k km, Campagnolo kit can take a lot of wear.

  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 9,862
    Campag tends to wear in with use rather than wear out.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • lesfirthlesfirth Posts: 1,226
    oxoman said:

    Campag tends to wear in with use rather than wear out.

    That might still be true for the high end of the range but it certainly does not apply to the lower end stuff.
  • bondurantbondurant Posts: 857
    Another key question is how much...it might be a bargain for shifters, chainset, derailleurs alone if they are all in good nick, even if the cassette and cables need replacing.
  • de_sistide_sisti Posts: 1,211
    edited August 2020
    Another key question is the price?
  • Just sold my 2011 SR 11 ..... Only wear issues I had were the front mech cage twice and I needed to replace the ratchet in the right lever. Obviously went through chain-rings. That went through every kind of weather, that was doing circa 10,000km a year. So it should all be fine .......... I'm on about 3k on my new Record.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,484
    It took me no time at all to break the plastic shifter paddle on a Record Lever.

    Rubbish, even Tiagra is built better
  • shortfallshortfall Posts: 3,287

    It took me no time at all to break the plastic shifter paddle on a Record Lever.

    Rubbish, even Tiagra is built better

    Did you mean to put this in the unpopular opinions thread?
  • It took me no time at all to break the plastic shifter paddle on a Record Lever.

    Rubbish, even Tiagra is built better

    Sure you did.

  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,484
    The plastic paddle is bad design... the front shifting is OK for as long as your derailleur is in tip top conditions... once it gets a bit cacked in winter and the friction increases, then the plastic paddle is under too much stress... it's not designed for that.
    Shimano Paddle is plastic and metal and the upshift lever that loads the spring is alloy and very robust.
    Overall, it's a more functional product... no frills but it does the job well
  • yellowv2yellowv2 Posts: 242
    Couldn't disagree more.
    I have Veloce on my winter bike and the shifting and paddle action is smoother than the Chorus on my Summer bike, which is also excellent.
    Just because it's plastic doesn't mean it's a bad design or inferior in any way.
    I'd be interested to know how a lever which has to perform two operations in different planes is more functional than a dedicated single lever action?
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,484
    yellowv2 said:

    Couldn't disagree more.
    I have Veloce on my winter bike and the shifting and paddle action is smoother than the Chorus on my Summer bike, which is also excellent.
    Just because it's plastic doesn't mean it's a bad design or inferior in any way.
    I'd be interested to know how a lever which has to perform two operations in different planes is more functional than a dedicated single lever action?

    I'm not here to prove anything. Look around the web and you will find plenty of people complaining about a broken Campagnolo plastic paddle. I broke one and I remember a few years earlier selling two of those on Ebay to people who had broken theirs. These were from a set of otherwise broken Centaur shifters (plastic internal gears failed).

    You see, round here there is a lot of arable land, which means that in the wet season we have a lot of mud on the roads... derailleurs get cacked and shifting sometimes gets a bit more rustic, sometimes there is a lot of resistance... with Shimano levers that's not a problem, with Campagnolo you might break a paddle.

    Winter in Italy where this stuff is made is bone dry (I've lived 27 years of my life in Italy)... so that's never an issue. Shimano can draw a lot of experience from their MTB ranges and tend to make things that cope with winter... in Campagnolo world mud is not an option

  • shortfallshortfall Posts: 3,287
    edited August 2020

    It took me no time at all to break the plastic shifter paddle on a Record Lever.

    Rubbish, even Tiagra is built better

    I just found the original thread where you first brought this up. You got them second hand and put another 20,000 miles on them and blamed road crud and cables that were not at their best for stiffening up the shifting. For sure the lever shouldn't just snap and I can agree with you that some modern versions of Campagnolo aren't as robust as their earlier counterparts, but you still hear of stellar mileages if it's properly maintained.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,484
    edited August 2020
    shortfall said:

    It took me no time at all to break the plastic shifter paddle on a Record Lever.

    Rubbish, even Tiagra is built better

    I just found the original thread where you first brought this up. You got them second hand and put another 20,000 miles on them and blamed road crud and cables that were not at their best for stiffening up the shifting. For sure the lever shouldn't just snap and I can agree with you that some modern versions of Campagnolo aren't as robust as their earlier counterparts, but you still hear of stellar mileages if it's properly maintained.
    Yep...

    I didn't realise the front mech was stiffening that much due to build up of dirt... I wash the bike regularly, but I don't go into every detail of every component. Shifting didn't feel super smooth, but it didn't feel like I was putting so much stress on the lever either.
    I had it on the bike stand when it happened.
    I was in the process of abandoning Campagnolo anyway.
    Now I have a mix of Shimano components, the levers are 5700... they work very well, done about 20,000 since 2017 and no cable was chewed... considering the price difference, I would definitively never go back.

    I am looking at slowly upgrading to Ultegra R8000... starting with the chainset, (which is now an old CX50 and has probably done 40 or 50K and seen 3 changes of rings)... which will work with 10 speed and then shifters, mechs and cassette at a second stage, maybe after the winter). I might be able to keep the front mech we'll see. Will probably keep the brakes, as they are 5800 and should work OK... I have the feeling all Shimano road calipers are the same thing in different shades of grey
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,484
    edited August 2020
    ... as an aside... a few years ago I got into dismantling Campagnolo shifters as most shops didn't want to do it and it was an opportunity to make a few bucks... nothing ever came out of it, other than a few parts ending up on Ebay.
    Point is... you can see how these things have become progressively worse. You take a pair of 1990s Mach 1 8 speed levers and they are made like a Swiss watch, quality parts, indestructible... they weigh a ton.
    Then 9 speed Veloce and 10 speed Record were still pretty good... that lasted until around 2007, when Veloce and Centaur 10 speed were introduced and those levers were disposable rubbish, with plastic ratchets not meant to last more than a few years of light summer use. Mach 3 didn't get any better... I just don't get why folks still have this Campagnolo reverence, which would be justified if we were in 1998 but right now it's just overpriced and mediocre stuff.
    Some of us still remember when they came out with Power torque, but there were no tools to remove the chainset once it was on, not even for workshops... an embarrassment that took months to fix...

    In theory these levers are serviceable, but hardly anyone do it and they charge a fortune... probably cheaper to replace them, which put them on the same level as Shimano ones... except in my experience the latter are cheaper and work better
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,484
    edited August 2020
  • bondurantbondurant Posts: 857
    edited August 2020
    I can add my experience of Shimano shifters breaking cables, rear mech jamming and, following that, years of virtually trouble free Campag use.

    But that would just be anecdotal too.

    Look hard enough and you will find people have had trouble with everything.

    Oh, and it's about £60 for a new Campag shifter internal. Hardly a fortune.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,484
    bondurant said:

    I can add my experience of Shimano shifters breaking cables, rear mech jamming and, following that, years of virtually trouble free Campag use.

    But that would just be anecdotal too.

    Look hard enough and you will find people have had trouble with everything.

    Oh, and it's about £60 for a new Campag shifter internal. Hardly a fortune.

    Never had a frayed cable with 5700... I wonder if it's because people use ferrules where they are not supposed to or something.... always used basic Shimano or knockoff inners and Shimano or Jagwire outers.

    Yes, you can buy spare parts, but then you are on your own... levers are quite fiddly to work with, especially the paddle shifter spring. I would have fixed it if I thought it was worth the bother. At the time I was also using HyRD semi hydraulic brakes, which were a pain with Campag levers... the throw was too long.
  • bondurantbondurant Posts: 857
    I am not talking about spare parts in that sense. I mean an entire shifter body. Including the plastic lever. Nothing fiddly at all, it's just a swap out. I would certainly not attempt a rebuild when there is this option, and I like repairing things.

    But we digress.
  • masjermasjer Posts: 362
    I know Shimano shifters are supposed to be factory lubed for life but I always lube the internals (Comma white spray grease) every so often. I've l got some old Ultegra 6600 shifters still working sweetly with at least 75,000 miles and also 105- 5600 and Tiagra 4700 with quite high mileages.
  • DeVlaeminckDeVlaeminck Posts: 7,394
    I've had and seen others have frayed cables with Shimano. My local shop says it sees loads - I took it to a shop because once they snap at that end they are difficult to remove. I don't have a reverence for Campag but my experience is it's better - not infallible but better.
    [Castle Donington Ladies FC - going up in '22]
  • pilot_petepilot_pete Posts: 2,113
    Like Ugo I gave up on Campag about three years ago. I had the censored 10spd Centaur levers that continually played up and then Record to replace them. Found them very agricultural.

    Changed to di2 and have never looked back. Fit and forget. Been running two bikes with it for four years and it’s behaved impeccably on both. Average 6.5k miles a year, wet and dry.

    What I didn’t do is go for the Shimano chainset. I fitted Rotor on both bikes.

    I run Dura Ace but use Ultegra cassettes and chains. Cannot remember having a problem with ANY item on either bike. I am more than satisfied with my choice.

    PP
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