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Should i sell my Marin Nail Trail 7?

peug26peug26 Posts: 35
Perhaps a strange question but I have a Marin Nail Trail 7 27.5" 2019 which I haven't used due to personal injury. Should i sell it? I don't think I will be doing much trail riding in the future either so perhaps the Marin will be a waste for towpaths? I believe that Marins are quite hard to come by nowadays as well.

Posts

  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 8,372
    If your not intending riding then now may be the time to sell as bikes going at a premium as in short supply.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • steve_sordysteve_sordy Posts: 2,038
    Do your research!
    Check on eBay what bikes like yours and in the same condition are selling for.
    Set a reasonable price and stick to it.

    One way to get a good price of course is to auction it, if you have the courage.

    Put yourself in the buyer's position and and answer in advance any question they might need to know. Lots of photos.
  • steve_sordysteve_sordy Posts: 2,038
    By the way, before you sell the bike; is your personal injury permanent? If not then consider hanging on the the bike. You never get what you want for your old bike.

    Once you have recovered, you will want to ride a bike again, won't you? :)
  • peug26peug26 Posts: 35
    Bike has gone. For £400 more than I bought it. Couldn't resist.

    I wont be doing much riding this year so it woul dhave been pointless to keep it. And by next year when all of these Covid shortages are gone I will buy another one. Very likely an electric one because I have heard decent things. Quite like Cube as a brand.
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 8,372
    Peug, you've done well with selling it, everything is going for a premium at the moment. You started well till you mentioned ebike, urgh. My personal opinion though.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • steve_sordysteve_sordy Posts: 2,038
    edited 16 August
    peug26 said:

    ..............And by next year when all of these Covid shortages are gone I will buy another one. Very likely an electric one because I have heard decent things. Quite like Cube as a brand.

    This is the best emtb website. :)
    https://www.emtbforums.com/

    They too have a Forum.
  • peug26peug26 Posts: 35
    Oxoman thank you. It is very strange, it's as if people are panic buying. But I can't complain I suppose. :D

    The only reason I mentioned the ebikes is because a friend of mine who is a cycling fanatic and has been riding across the country for decades has just bought one and he has given very positive feedback.

    Steve, thank you very much for the link. I'll have a look at it.
  • steve_sordysteve_sordy Posts: 2,038
    edited 16 August
    I bought an emtb after years of refusing to accept that arthritic knees were ruining my riding. I was down to a 30t front ring and a 10-50t cassette and I was still struggling. I was using Volterol gel on my knees AND a 400mg Brufen. Despite all that I was down to one 10 mile ride and then three days off to recover.

    I had a YT Capra Carbon and a Whyte T130C RS, both 27.5ers and 1x12. I sold the Capra to help buy a Focus Jam2 9.6 NINE (carbon 29er, 1x12). I kept the Whyte because I loved it, but sold if after a few months of buying the Focus. Now I can easily do 25-30 mile rides, every day if I wanted to. The pain has gone from my cycling and the joy has returned!

    OK, the bike is a bit faster uphill than most ordinary bikes, but it is no faster downhill. Also, when I'm on the flat the pedal assist gives out at 15.5mph (it's the law). Then I'm on my own on a big heavy bike (20.4kg/45lbs) with wide draggy tyres (29x2.5 3C HRII).



    It's a lot of fun!!!! <3

    The 378 Watt-hour battery is in the downtube and I can clip a second battery onto the downtube if I want to go further. The motor is a Shimano E-8000 and generates a maximum 70Nm of torque. The average power output is 250 Watts (it's the law) and I have a more powerful lightbulb than that outside my house!
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 8,372
    Peug, I've not got a problem with ebikes if used by people that wouldn't be able to cycle without help. Steve S above has a valid excuse sadly some of the lazy people i know don't, they use it as an excuse to be lazy. The other people that annoy me are the ones that alter the settings to overcome max speed etc. I may one day have one, but not until I'm incapable of managing unassisted. Ride every month or so with some older guys of 70 and 80 and whilst I have the speed they still have the endurance.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • loltorideloltoride Posts: 340
    peug26 said:

    Bike has gone. For £400 more than I bought it. Couldn't resist.

    I wont be doing much riding this year so it woul dhave been pointless to keep it. And by next year when all of these Covid shortages are gone I will buy another one. Very likely an electric one because I have heard decent things. Quite like Cube as a brand.

    I sold my bike for £600 over cost new almost 2 years old but I did get the bike initially discounted.
    So Far!
  • steve_sordysteve_sordy Posts: 2,038
    edited 18 August
    oxoman said:

    Peug, I've not got a problem with ebikes if used by people that wouldn't be able to cycle without help. Steve S above has a valid excuse sadly some of the lazy people i know don't, they use it as an excuse to be lazy. The other people that annoy me are the ones that alter the settings to overcome max speed etc. I may one day have one, but not until I'm incapable of managing unassisted. Ride every month or so with some older guys of 70 and 80 and whilst I have the speed they still have the endurance.

    You don't need an excuse to ride an ebike. Even Danny Macaskill has one! He uses it to ride to places he otherwise couldn't get to. Many pro riders use them to maximise the descending time in places without an uplift. By the way, why is using an uplift considered as OK and not to be lazy and/or cheating, but using a 250W motor is lazy and/or cheating?

    I agree that some ebike riders may indeed be lazy. But laziness amongst riders is not restricted to the riders of ebikes and you will surely know this. When I go out on my emtb, I still get sweaty and knackered, my heart rate still gets too high for my liking. All the guys I ride with on their emtbs are in a similar vein. They get sweaty and they get knackered.

    If I was to characterise the differences before and after emtb, it would be this:

    • # I attempt steeper climbs and often succeed, but not always.
    • # I can ride over softer stuff for longer (deep dry sand, mud, deep gravel etc) although that may be the 29x2.5" tyres rather then the 27.5x2.2" ones I used to ride.
    • # I am slower on the flat. The pedal assist stops at 15.5mph and I am left pedalling a bike that weighs 45 lbs (20.4kg) and has big low pressure tyres that have a sticky compound.
    • # I am no quicker when descending, it's the skill that matters!
    • # I am slightly faster uphill and I can maintain it for longer. (It's this that seems to disgruntle analogue riders the most, and I understand why).
    • # I am having more fun and less pain! <3
    • # I can now afford only one bike! :(
    • # I had to buy a tow-bar and rack to transport the bike because it was too big and heavy to go on the roof or in the boot! (I have lower back problems as well as dodgy knees).

    Only one of the emtb guys I have ridden with has chipped his motor. He hasn't done it because he's lazy (he rides many more miles than me) or because he wants to commute at a sensible speed (ie above 15.5 mph). He has done it because when you are racing up to a jump, the last thing you want is for the power to cut out just when you need more speed! I have never been much of a jumper, so that doesn't appeal to me anyway. But I do wish the cut out speed was 20 mph like it is in the USA <b class="Bold">on the same bike!
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