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  • morstarmorstar Posts: 4,663
    morstar wrote:
    TheBigBean wrote:
    Presumably he could also have run this quickly if he did it on the track or on a downhill course. It's interesting that he has chosen to do it with the rotating pacemakers. Perhaps, this way is more marketable than the other ways.
    The track is not ideal as the bends are quite tight and you'd be spending 50% of your time running corners. More force required as you're accelerating in corners.
    Downhill is a clear mockery of the human effort. Pacemakers are used in all major road races so they are not making a mockery, they have simply been optimised.

    The fact that they pulled out the car, the bikes and pacemakers so they weren’t in the finishing pictures would suggest they thought they were making a mockery

    What, you mean just like they do in all bike races. You want the winner crossing the line with clear images, the pacemakers were all in the background.

    It is a simple feat of extending the boundaries of human ability. It does not stand as a record for perfectly justifiable reasons but it is a milestone in human achievement.
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    morstar wrote:
    TheBigBean wrote:
    Presumably he could also have run this quickly if he did it on the track or on a downhill course. It's interesting that he has chosen to do it with the rotating pacemakers. Perhaps, this way is more marketable than the other ways.
    The track is not ideal as the bends are quite tight and you'd be spending 50% of your time running corners. More force required as you're accelerating in corners.
    Downhill is a clear mockery of the human effort. Pacemakers are used in all major road races so they are not making a mockery, they have simply been optimised.

    The fact that they pulled out the car, the bikes and pacemakers so they weren’t in the finishing pictures would suggest they thought they were making a mockery

    They didn't need the car or the Pacers in the last km. He sprinted it waving to the crowds. A fantastic run and a great strategy executed perfectly.
  • ProssPross Posts: 29,010
    My favourite stat from this run - there have been over 51 million Parkruns (that are a nominal distance of 5k), out of those only 5 have ever been run faster than the 5k splits in this marathon.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    And the womens marathon record going the day after this ? After 16 years ? That's not coincidence.
  • LongshotLongshot Posts: 935
    Pross wrote:
    My favourite stat from this run - there have been over 51 million Parkruns (that are a nominal distance of 5k), out of those only 5 have ever been run faster than the 5k splits in this marathon.

    That's an amazing stat although I guess, once you think about it, that it's quite possible that most quick runners frown at running Parkruns.
    You can fool some of the people all of the time. Concentrate on those people.
  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 16,015
    Hope he does it. Totally artificial and no world record but it takes some doing. I like the car shining the laser so that the pacers can pace themselves.

    Nothing remotely artificial about it surely? True, it doesn't comply with the artificial (and perfectly reasonable) constraints on what makes a legitimate world record but that doesn't mean it is this achievement is artificial - not optimising the conditions is surely artificial given that the purpose of the event is to see how quickly someone can run a random distance. And never mind that surely wearing running shoes, doing extensive training and eating a performance optimising diet is equally artificial?

    On a bad day I've taken longer to cycle that distance!
    Faster than a tent.......
  • Longshot wrote:
    Pross wrote:
    My favourite stat from this run - there have been over 51 million Parkruns (that are a nominal distance of 5k), out of those only 5 have ever been run faster than the 5k splits in this marathon.

    That's an amazing stat although I guess, once you think about it, that it's quite possible that most quick runners frown at running Parkruns.

    Only one British runner has ever gone under 1 hour for a half marathon - so it would be a pretty hard workout for even the quickest.
  • morstarmorstar Posts: 4,663
    TheBigBean wrote:
    morstar wrote:
    TheBigBean wrote:
    Presumably he could also have run this quickly if he did it on the track or on a downhill course. It's interesting that he has chosen to do it with the rotating pacemakers. Perhaps, this way is more marketable than the other ways.
    The track is not ideal as the bends are quite tight and you'd be spending 50% of your time running corners. More force required as you're accelerating in corners.
    Downhill is a clear mockery of the human effort. Pacemakers are used in all major road races so they are not making a mockery, they have simply been optimised.

    Pacemakers are used, but only when they run from the start. This involved fresh pacemakers running in the most aero format. Note the reason given for Radcliffe's quick marathon is that she had male pacemakers presumably providing the same advantage.

    The track is quicker if you look at world record times.
    Fair point on the pacemakers but that s=is why it doesn't stand as a record but does as a human achievement.
    The track is quicker partly due to it's surface but is only raced on for less than 30 mins at a time. Track racing is more bluntly tactical and about beating your rival rather than a time. For longer distances mechanical efficiency vs blunt force equation moves towards the former so less stress of hard cornering becomes beneficial towards running efficiency. Saturday times showed visible slowing in the corners in the early stages of getting ahead of schedule. Once they had the 9-10 second advantage, the times hit a completely unwavering pace for all but the last km. i.e. whilst they were pushing harder, they were taking the corners easier.
  • ProssPross Posts: 29,010
    Longshot wrote:
    Pross wrote:
    My favourite stat from this run - there have been over 51 million Parkruns (that are a nominal distance of 5k), out of those only 5 have ever been run faster than the 5k splits in this marathon.

    That's an amazing stat although I guess, once you think about it, that it's quite possible that most quick runners frown at running Parkruns.

    The fastest is by Andrew Baddeley who made the Olympic final in Beijing for 1500m. A lot of top level club athletes do them regularly as race prep.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    Longshot wrote:
    Pross wrote:
    My favourite stat from this run - there have been over 51 million Parkruns (that are a nominal distance of 5k), out of those only 5 have ever been run faster than the 5k splits in this marathon.

    That's an amazing stat although I guess, once you think about it, that it's quite possible that most quick runners frown at running Parkruns.

    There's plenty of really fast runners doing parkrun, but a parkrun isn't usually designed for flat out speed. My local one has a couple of dead turns and some tight corners and the odd squirrel playing chicken with you.
  • Fenix wrote:
    Longshot wrote:
    Pross wrote:
    My favourite stat from this run - there have been over 51 million Parkruns (that are a nominal distance of 5k), out of those only 5 have ever been run faster than the 5k splits in this marathon.

    That's an amazing stat although I guess, once you think about it, that it's quite possible that most quick runners frown at running Parkruns.

    There's plenty of really fast runners doing parkrun, but a parkrun isn't usually designed for flat out speed. My local one has a couple of dead turns and some tight corners and the odd squirrel playing chicken with you.


    Thats an amazing stat. Not least because it wasn't one park run it was over 8 of them.
  • laurentianlaurentian Posts: 1,876
    The stat that stood out to me was that this sub two hour marathon meant running and average of 17 second 100 metre times throughout.
    Wilier Izoard XP
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