Dave Brailsford prostate cancer

D O GD O G Posts: 286
edited 20 October in Pro race
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May partly explain why Ineos have been fairly lacklustre of late.

Hope he recovers well.
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  • shipleyshipley Posts: 538
    5hr op means it’s been silent for a while and they had to dig deep. My bro went through the same thing. 7hr op and a very long recovery as he had no symptoms and had no way of knowing he had it. His PSA score was over 100.....mine is 0.5 :shock:

    If you are a male in your 50s get tested annually, it’s a blood test only and watch the profile of your score. If it increases from year to year you can get very early non invasive treatment and manage it.

    It’s one of the easiest cancers to control so don’t die of ignorance or neglect.
  • it's really none of our business but since they've released the information, Good Luck Dave I wish you all the best.
  • shipley wrote:
    ...If you are a male in your 50's get tested annually...
    If you only ever follow one bit of advice on this forum, follow this one....
    I'm not getting old... I'm just using lower gears......
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  • RideOnTimeRideOnTime Posts: 4,712
    Is there a correlation between cycling and prostate cancer. or does it just seem that way. :?:
  • [f you are a male in your 50s get tested annually, it’s a blood test only and watch the profile of your score. If it increases from year to year you can get very early non invasive treatment and manage it.

    Possibly the worst bit if advice ever. I read an interesting article today about a guy who did just that.
    He was told that he was most definitely positive, had a scan which confirmed everybody's worst fears and went into hospital expecting to come out feet first.

    Then they casually said that they were wrong and he could go home. A false positive and he's not the first and he won't be the last. But our wonderful NHS don't care about all the worry that their inefficiency causes, just as long as they don't get sued for missing something.

    Be very cautious about believing anything to do with the PSA test.
  • apreadingapreading Posts: 4,526
    You shouldnt get tested if you have cycled in the 48 hours prior to prostate cancer check as cycling increases the levels of PSA that they measure temporarily.

    Many doctors don't realise that strenuous pedalling raises levels of a protein called PSA, which is also a key indicator of possible prostate cancer. As a result they are sending healthy men for painful - and unnecessary - biopsies.

    Consultant urologist Chris Eden, of the Royal Surrey County Hospital, in, Guilford, says GPs should routinely ask men with high PSA if they're keen cyclists.

    "Unfortunately some doctors may be unaware that cycling can spuriously raise a man`s PSA levels and so refer their patient for further and unnecessary treatment. All because their cycling produced a false positive," he said.

    He says raised PSA levels caused by cycling, do not put the rider at any risk of cancer.

    "Cycling does raise PSA levels but only temporarily. So the way to distinguish whether cycling has caused a rise in levels is to refrain from getting on a bike for 48 hours and then having a second PSA test. The levels will have dropped if cycling was responsible for the rise."

    PSA tests measure the total amount of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in the blood. PSA is a protein produced by normal cells in the prostate and also by prostate cancer cells. It is normal for all men to have a small amount of PSA in their blood. But a raised level can sometimes be a sign of prostate cancer which is why further investigation such as a biopsy is needed.

    Mr Eden said: "The irony here is that physical exercise such as cycling is actually protective against prostate cancer since it`s a way to avoid weight gain and is generally a way to keep healthy. So it`s important that cyclists don`t get scared off from enjoying their hobby.

    "I think any man who is a regular cyclist and who needs a PSA test should tell their doctor about their hobby. It`s surprising how many doctors may not know about the association and this could avoid unpleasant further investigation. Mentioning you regularly use your bike could save on a lot of discomfort."
  • ridgeriderridgerider Posts: 2,734
    For me, it wasn't any test results that told me something was wrong, it was poor urine flow and just going to the loo more often than usual.

    The blood (psa), finger and MRI tests have only confirmed what my bladder was telling me, which is that I have an enlarged prostate. The next round of tests are due to find out why it is like that.

    A doctor friend mentioned the influence of cycling on any blood test, but I think he just said abstain for 48hrs before any psa test.

    All I can say is listen to your body incase it's trying to tell you something.
    Half man, Half bike...and now more familiar with the work of Prostate Cancer UK
  • shipleyshipley Posts: 538
    That’s correct, if your prostate has swelled to contract your urine flow. If it swells in the other direction you will have no symptoms. A PSA test showing increased levels will give you an indication that you should get some more tests. It’s not definitive but is a good enough indicator to check.

    Or you can think it rubbish and end up dead. I know a few who have.
  • bompingtonbompington Posts: 6,765
    There is plenty of evidence that, overall, prostate screening is not beneficial. Here's a pretty well balanced explanation:
    https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/prostate- ... a-testing/
  • DeVlaeminckDeVlaeminck Posts: 5,250
    bompington wrote:
    There is plenty of evidence that, overall, prostate screening is not beneficial. Here's a pretty well balanced explanation:
    https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/prostate- ... a-testing/

    I must say that isn't that convincing.

    It mentions the false positives but then says that MRI scans largely solve that problem.

    It mentions 15% false negatives but then does not being 100% invalidate the test, I don't see why.

    It mentions revealing cancers that would not shorten life expectancy - but would it not be better to know and monitor over a period of time than live in ignorance?

    There may be more to it - maybe it's not so easy to monitor the rate of growth of the cancer but it's hard not to suspect the real issue is that it would be very expensive for a cash strapped health service and possibly at a population level would not be a good use of cash ?
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  • bompingtonbompington Posts: 6,765
    bompington wrote:
    There is plenty of evidence that, overall, prostate screening is not beneficial. Here's a pretty well balanced explanation:
    https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/prostate- ... a-testing/

    I must say that isn't that convincing.

    It mentions the false positives but then says that MRI scans largely solve that problem.

    It mentions 15% false negatives but then does not being 100% invalidate the test, I don't see why.

    It mentions revealing cancers that would not shorten life expectancy - but would it not be better to know and monitor over a period of time than live in ignorance?

    There may be more to it - maybe it's not so easy to monitor the rate of growth of the cancer but it's hard not to suspect the real issue is that it would be very expensive for a cash strapped health service and possibly at a population level would not be a good use of cash ?
    The bottom line is that research shows that outcomes are no better for screened populations than unscreened.
  • philbar72philbar72 Posts: 2,179
    so, say someone you know is a keen cyclist, and exhibits the problems as described in the basic description, i.e. peeing a bit more than normal, and feeling like it is never quite complete when you go to the loo.

    what would you say to them. I'm that person by the way.

    be interested in seeing what you folk say.
  • bompingtonbompington Posts: 6,765
    philbar72 wrote:
    so, say someone you know is a keen cyclist, and exhibits the problems as described in the basic description, i.e. peeing a bit more than normal, and feeling like it is never quite complete when you go to the loo.

    what would you say to them. I'm that person by the way.

    be interested in seeing what you folk say.
    Well that's partly just old age ;-)

    Or more particularly symptoms of an enlarged prostate, which is usually BPH, which is not quite universal but really common in men as they get older.
    But obviously can be more sinister, so in your position I'd go on an internet forum and ask a bunch of randoms who may or may not have a clue for advice.

    Or you could go see a doctor.
  • m.r.m.m.r.m. Posts: 1,540
    bompington wrote:
    go see a doctor.
    PTP Champion 2019
  • philbar72philbar72 Posts: 2,179
    bompington wrote:
    philbar72 wrote:
    so, say someone you know is a keen cyclist, and exhibits the problems as described in the basic description, i.e. peeing a bit more than normal, and feeling like it is never quite complete when you go to the loo.

    what would you say to them. I'm that person by the way.

    be interested in seeing what you folk say.
    Well that's partly just old age ;-)

    Or more particularly symptoms of an enlarged prostate, which is usually BPH, which is not quite universal but really common in men as they get older.
    But obviously can be more sinister, so in your position I'd go on an internet forum and ask a bunch of randoms who may or may not have a clue for advice.

    Or you could go see a doctor.

    yep, that's the plan. the second part of this. need to drink less coffee and more water as well.
  • ridgeriderridgerider Posts: 2,734
    philbar72 wrote:
    so, say someone you know is a keen cyclist, and exhibits the problems as described in the basic description, i.e. peeing a bit more than normal, and feeling like it is never quite complete when you go to the loo.

    what would you say to them. I'm that person by the way.

    be interested in seeing what you folk say.

    "Just relax, it will make the examinations less uncomfortable"

    Or as the nurse said to me, and with hindsight, she is a very wise woman and made it very simple... "Just turn up for your appointments".
    Half man, Half bike...and now more familiar with the work of Prostate Cancer UK
  • ridgerider wrote:
    philbar72 wrote:
    so, say someone you know is a keen cyclist, and exhibits the problems as described in the basic description, i.e. peeing a bit more than normal, and feeling like it is never quite complete when you go to the loo.

    what would you say to them. I'm that person by the way.

    be interested in seeing what you folk say.

    "Just relax, it will make the examinations less uncomfortable"

    Or as the nurse said to me, and with hindsight, she is a very wise woman and made it very simple... "Just turn up for your appointments".

    She certainly had hindsight too :)
  • I've just had a PSA blood test thanks to having pain in my nether regions and my doc wanting to eliminate prostate cancer. After worrying for a few days, my PSA was nice and low, but my doc still wants me to see a urologist as there was a tiny bit of blood in my wee test.

    From my viewpoint, no the PSA test isn't perfect but it hopefully reduces the likelihood that I will be surprised, one day, to find I have prostate cancer. It also gives me a figure that I can refer to when I have my next PSA test in a year's time.

    Surely if there's nothing that definitively says yes or no, something is better than nothing?
  • bflkbflk Posts: 240
    My flow rate dropped this year so went to see the doc but whilst he weighed up the pros and cons of the PSA test I got the impression he was gently steering me away from doing it. As I understood you can get false positives and false negatives from the test. A drop off in flow is normal in the 50s anyway.

    Everyone needs to weigh it up in conjunction with their GP.
  • bflk wrote:
    My flow rate dropped this year so went to see the doc but whilst he weighed up the pros and cons of the PSA test I got the impression he was gently steering me away from doing it. As I understood you can get false positives and false negatives from the test. A drop off in flow is normal in the 50s anyway.

    Everyone needs to weigh it up in conjunction with their GP.

    You get a reading, or level, which if nothing else you can compare with your next test. Yes, the reading can be influenced by other things, but if you avoid those things or tell the doc, then surely it's worth doing?

    I can't see why you wouldn't have a test, the doc isn't going to rip out your prostate based on something that they all know is possibly a false reading. They also aren't going to recommend a test unless you present them with symptoms that might suggest a prostate problem. Surely an early warning is better than no warning? They will do other tests after a bad PSA test.

    I had one or two symptoms, so the doc suggested it as part of a full blood test. He also wanted a wee test. Everything came back ok except the wee test, which had a bit of blood in it. So it is unlikely that I have prostate cancer, although because of the blood and the problem continuing, I'm off to see the urologist to get a finger up my bum, amongst other things.
  • RichN95.RichN95. Posts: 22,525
    Lance Armstrong passed 500 cancer tests.
    Twitter: @RichN95
  • ridgeriderridgerider Posts: 2,734
    So I am through the psa/finger guesswork gateway now and into the real world of ultrasound and MRI which is where they see what's going on a bit more clearly. Off for a biopsy next week to find out why the little 20p for the swearbox is the size and shading it is.
    Half man, Half bike...and now more familiar with the work of Prostate Cancer UK
  • ProssPross Posts: 21,003
    ridgerider wrote:
    So I am through the psa/finger guesswork gateway now and into the real world of ultrasound and MRI which is where they see what's going on a bit more clearly. Off for a biopsy next week to find out why the little 20p for the swearbox is the size and shading it is.

    Hope everything turns out OK.
  • I get that there is the stress of a false test but weighed up against finding out that you do have cancer when it is too late, surely it's worth doing?

    I also get that the test can miss cancer, but if the cancer is there and a test finds it, surely that is better than not having a test?

    Yes the tests should be better, but they are all we have to detect a cancer that is very hard to detect. In time, hopefully, there will be a better test.

    @Ridgerider Good luck with everything, hope it all ends up ok.
  • orraloonorraloon Posts: 5,233
    Another one joining the club, as it seems this thread is forming...

    Combination of reading about SDB, and the thinking back on how often I now seem to be needing to urinate during the night, and looking on the NHS site about symptoms, and reading this thread... Talked with GP practice nurse, advised to book GP appointment first to take wider view than simply getting the PSA test.

    Think it is better to go get checked out not just ignore. Know a few guys who turned out to have prostate cancer, couple died, one all cleared after big time chemo and radiology, one in abeyance. Getting older is a b1tch.
  • Hmm been meaning to join this thread but haven't, a pattern you will recognize as the post proceeds.
    Seven years ago I had a certain amount of discomfort and difficulty in emptying but felt no need to do anything. These things clear up don't they? Ended up in A&E being admitted on a Saturday night. (That was an education in itself) Enlarged Prostate which had busily poisoned me and left me with knees swollen like melons. When the cathater released the build up I was mortified as the bowls prepared in readiness overflowed! The bladder holds 1litre of fluid but I exceeded that but some wide margin.
    After a week in hospital and Mrs SG flying back from Oz, enduring gratitude to the staff of Singapore Airlines for changing tickets and not gouging us, I am home with District Nurse attendance, then self-cathaterisation. The Consultant says I can have an op, what do you want to do? I say I will wait. Three years later the Prostate made it's own decision and I was operated on and home in three days, back on the bike in three months.
    The point of the long and weary tale is simply to emphasise, If you have suspiscions do not delay. I was stupid and ignored clear and increasing signals. I nearly died from the self-generated poison. WHAT A FOOL.
    'fool'
  • Perhaps the reluctance to have a test, or even post on this thread, is about some sort of macho fear? Perhaps it's just not the thing to talk about?

    I have a pain between my bum and boll*cks (my perineum), this started during a crazy 10 day trip driving from home in the south of France, to Yorkshire and back. 6000 kms of sitting in a van, ended up with me feeling like I was sitting on a golf ball. I also got an occasional and mild burning sensation in my balls. I tried ignoring it, read up on it and started to scare myself.

    After 5 days I gave in and went to see my docs (not easy as my french isn't great). Luckily he speaks superb english and being France, I saw him within 24 hours and within 36 hours my tests were done and being analysed. I had to wait 24 hours before getting my results and during this time it dawned on me that I would get to see my results before a doc looked at them (as is the system here, you are responsible for your results, not your doc). I knew that a PSA score over 3 could suggest cancer and I also knew that the test isn't 100% reliable. My symptoms aren't typical of prostate cancer, but my pee flow has also decreased very slightly, having slowed during my 50s (I'm nearly 59).

    I decided not to look at the results when we collected them from the lab, preferring to wait until I saw the doc in a couple of days. The wee test then showed up in the post and revealed no urinary tract infection. This then sent me into a quick panic as I was hoping for some antibiotics and then get back on the bike. As I knew she would, my other half had looked at the results and told me that my score was only 1.6.

    When I saw the doc again he initially gave me the option of leaving it and seeing how things developed but then changed his mind and said I should see a urologist. He said that as the urologist would be sticking their finger up my bum, he felt sure I didn't want him to do it too. He was correct.

    So I am now hoping to see someone this week and get to the bottom (sorry!) of what is going on. I am hoping now that it is something called pudendal neuralgia, also known as 'cyclist's syndrome' apparently. Naturally I'm not looking forward to a finger up my bum, but it needs to be done. I am a devote worrier, imagining all sorts and always stressing myself out but I have to get this sorted. There is absolutely no point in avoiding something that could potentially kill me just because I am scared of the unknown.
  • petecopeteco Posts: 170
    As part of my annual company medical I have had a doctor put a finger up my bum twice to check my prostate. It’s not painful, just uncomfortable, so please don’t avoid it. I would rather have that than crash my bike.

    Pete
  • D O GD O G Posts: 286
    Well I've learned a lot, so thanks for all those who have shared their tales & hope that it all works out for everyone.

    Some people pay good money to have something shoved in their 20p for the swearbox, so enjoy the freebie.
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