Road tubeless tyres, where and how much?

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  • Don't worry about the wet grip too much. I am comparing to the best tyres out there's. against most tyres the conti's are pretty good. I am in no hurry to remove them.
    What are these mythical best tyres out there?
  • parkergrey wrote:
    Don't worry about the wet grip too much. I am comparing to the best tyres out there's. against most tyres the conti's are pretty good. I am in no hurry to remove them.
    What are these mythical best tyres out there?

    Maxxis High Roads
    I'm sorry you don't believe in miracles
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,858
    Vittoria pave tubulars is one tyre. I still have a Soft spot for tubs. Even the conti comps seem to have more grip. This can be subjective though I can't measure this.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 24,147
    Vittoria pave tubulars is one tyre. I still have a Soft spot for tubs. Even the conti comps seem to have more grip. This can be subjective though I can't measure this.

    When I rode tubs, I always had that feeling of being over dressed for the event, if you know what I mean... a bit like wearing a tuxedo to go down to McDonalds.
    And then those Vittoria wore out quickly, very quickly... they really are racing tyres
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,858
    yes they do wear quickly ugo but and puncture too.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • shamrock134shamrock134 Posts: 714
    My rear "Hutchinson Fusion5 All Season 11Storm" has not fared too well this winter on London's roads. It's cut up pretty badly and I've had to use 3 tyre plugs/anchovies on punctures that sealant couldn't fix. Two of these plugs have since started leaking air so I think the tyre is dead. Slightly disappointed it didn't quite make it to 2000 miles or through 1 winter considering it's meant to be "all season".

    I've got some of the new Pirelli Cinturato Velo tyres to put on. They seem to be praised for their puncture protection... https://www.bicyclerollingresistance.co ... -velo-2018
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,858
    edited 30 January
    The pro one on Jarno's test are fairly puncture resistant but we know they are not in reality. However the thick tread must be something in there favour. The thread is 0.6mm thicker than the IRC formula pro Xguard but is also 0.6mm thinner on the sidewall. So if your punctures are mainly in tread then they could fair quite well. I wonder though how resistant they are to side wall damage.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • bobonesbobones Posts: 961
    My rear "Hutchinson Fusion5 All Season 11Storm" has not fared too well this winter on London's roads. It's cut up pretty badly and I've had to use 3 tyre plugs/anchovies on punctures that sealant couldn't fix. Two of these plugs have since started leaking air so I think the tyre is dead. Slightly disappointed it didn't quite make it to 2000 miles or through 1 winter considering it's meant to be "all season".
    The tyre isn't really dead just because you've got some leaking plugs. You could always patch them from the inside or fit new plugs if you can be bothered. 2000 miles isn't all that shabby, particularly as it sounds as if there's a bit of life in them yet. What sealant do you use?
  • shamrock134shamrock134 Posts: 714
    bobones wrote:
    My rear "Hutchinson Fusion5 All Season 11Storm" has not fared too well this winter on London's roads. It's cut up pretty badly and I've had to use 3 tyre plugs/anchovies on punctures that sealant couldn't fix. Two of these plugs have since started leaking air so I think the tyre is dead. Slightly disappointed it didn't quite make it to 2000 miles or through 1 winter considering it's meant to be "all season".
    The tyre isn't really dead just because you've got some leaking plugs. You could always patch them from the inside or fit new plugs if you can be bothered. 2000 miles isn't all that shabby, particularly as it sounds as if there's a bit of life in them yet. What sealant do you use?

    True, I haven't actually chucked it yet since putting the Pirelli on. I had already patched one of the holes internally but when the second plug started leaking I got fed up. It could probably serve as a front tyre once patched up. The rear definitely seems to take more of a battering!

    I'm using Orange Seal Endurance based on recommendations from mates but willing to try others if there are "better" ones.
  • bobonesbobones Posts: 961
    From what I've read, the normal Orange Seal is better at plugging holes than the Endurance, but Endurance has advantages in hot and dry climates. Keep us posted on how you get on with the Pirellis.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 24,147
    This thread was originally open to help people buying tubeless tyres at a reasonable cost. The problem of availability and cost has not disappeared in the meantime.

    Lately it has developed into the "how to patch a tubeless tyre" thread.

    The all point of tubeless tyres is that you shouldn't have to worry about any of that... but if that becomes the main topic of discussion, then maybe something is not quite right
  • shamrock134shamrock134 Posts: 714
    This thread was originally open to help people buying tubeless tyres at a reasonable cost. The problem of availability and cost has not disappeared in the meantime.

    Lately it has developed into the "how to patch a tubeless tyre" thread.

    The all point of tubeless tyres is that you shouldn't have to worry about any of that... but if that becomes the main topic of discussion, then maybe something is not quite right

    I don't recall asking how to patch a tubeless tyre. Forum threads evolve. If someone is struggling to find where to buy tubeless tyres and work out how much they cost then they have other issues. :lol:

    Yes, I transitioned to tubeless to avoid the hassles of puncturing and inner tube changing since I commute daily on debris-filled city roads. Overall, I still think it's been a positive change but there are certainly challenges and costs associated with tubeless that some might not consider worthwhile.
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,858
    what size plugs have you used. The thin ones particuarly the GI plugs do have issues staying in the tyres. a thicker plug can be your solution.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • shamrock134shamrock134 Posts: 714
    what size plugs have you used. The thin ones particuarly the GI plugs do have issues staying in the tyres. a thicker plug can be your solution.

    Yeah, the standard Genuine Innovations 'Side of Bacon'. :D

    I probably need to get better at plugging them too as I expect I made the cut bigger in the process of stabbing the plug in! :oops:
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,858
    Those GI plugs are not that good. Try the maxalamikit with 3.5mm plugs (merlin sell them https://www.merlincycles.com/maxalami-r ... 10339.html). if you have a big hole a small plug, particularly one that is not very sticky, wont seal it. The whole reason why this was created was to resolve the very problem you have. I have been there was no solution other than patching (perhaps dyanplugs is a solution but I am too tight to try) so here we are. The main issue is tyre companies are recomending repair kits. It is a problem for tubeless uptake.

    Plugs like tyres are not all equal.In fact different brands of plugs feel quite different. some are more tacky than others.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • lincolndavelincolndave Posts: 6,877
    Has anyone tried the Effetto Mariposa Vitamina CL sealent additave as yet?, i read an article on it and suppose to work well.
    I started using their sealant last year and am quite happy with it up to date, the additive is suppose to help with larger holes in the tyre
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,858
    You have to remove the tyre to add it and I dont like doing that (mess) and potential issues reseating some tyres also by the time I could add some there is a big plug in the tyre and that has sealed the hole. So a solution in search of a problem even though it works. You dont add it preventively as the sealant goes off much quicker. You can inject through the valave as it can clog the valve.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • lincolndavelincolndave Posts: 6,877
    You have to remove the tyre to add it and I dont like doing that (mess) and potential issues reseating some tyres also by the time I could add some there is a big plug in the tyre and that has sealed the hole. So a solution in search of a problem even though it works. You dont add it preventively as the sealant goes off much quicker. You can inject through the valave as it can clog the valve.

    Cheers Malcolm, I read you could put it in the tyre on the initial set up, but I did not realise the sealant goes off quicker
  • zefszefs Posts: 484
    Update on Hutchinson Performance 11 storm, I can recommend them for all round usage since I've ridden 2000km so far and they have 2 small cuts and no punctures (a few rides on wet roads but I mostly ride on good conditions). Previously I had Galactik's and Yksion UST which cut more but are faster since they are more race oriented.
  • zefs wrote:
    Update on Hutchinson Performance 11 storm, I can recommend them for all round usage since I've ridden 2000km so far and they have 2 small cuts and no punctures (a few rides on wet roads but I mostly ride on good conditions). Previously I had Galactik's and Yksion UST which cut more but are faster since they are more race oriented.

    They seem reasonably priced as well
    I'm sorry you don't believe in miracles
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,858
    £/ per mile is important for determining valve.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • kingstoniankingstonian Posts: 1,734
    This thread was originally open to help people buying tubeless tyres at a reasonable cost. The problem of availability and cost has not disappeared in the meantime.

    Lately it has developed into the "how to patch a tubeless tyre" thread.

    The all point of tubeless tyres is that you shouldn't have to worry about any of that... but if that becomes the main topic of discussion, then maybe something is not quite right


    Agree with you on cost - they do seem to be significantly more expensive still. Availability is improving, but there are still an awful lot of bike shops that look at you blankly when they get a question about road tubeless tyres..........

    Ease of use (fitting, adding sealant etc etc), is still a big stumbling block and until it is improved they won't gain acceptance from a sizeable proportion of road cyclists.
  • pgmableypgmabley Posts: 107
    Any recommendations for decently puncture protected 32mm tubeless tyre for Audaxing, particurlarly PBP this year.

    I'm in Chilterns, plenty of flint around.
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,858
    it is easy fitting tubeless tyres you just have to rims that meet a certain standard first. Knowing if your rims meet those standard is fairly easy.

    I have written a guide on my websitwe which is fairly brand neutral but reading a review on the a tubeless tyre this morning the reviewer was adding sealant by pouring it into the tyre then finish mounting and then inflate. One that can lead to some mess (sealant bubling out of when inflated or a spill) but if the tyre is a too loose a fit the tyre will either not go up (then you have a mess) or you end up using compressed air which if you have poured in stans probably means you could have some stanimals and a more dilute sealant mix as a result. The issue therefore is not a lack of a tubeless standard but people in the trade doing it all backward because when tubeless got started with MTB, you had to do it backwards because there was no properly tubeless ready kit on the market.

    That has changed but people still do things backwards. That review talked about it taking 30 minutes to mount a pair of tyres. It take me 15 minutes the way I do it and there is no mess. That includes fitting the tape and valve. This is not rocket science you know.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • The SpidermanThe Spiderman Posts: 5,625
    I’ve just fitted my first UST road tubeless set up.
    Mavic tyres on Mavic rims.
    Inflated tyre with a track pump and tyres went straight up even without sealant.
    Removed valve core added sealant with the supplied injector and reinflated. Very easy.
    Having said that I have messed around with tubeless on my MTB and that can be a PITA but that was with non tubeless tyres and due to not checking the tape and interface first.
    Get those right and it’s a doddle.
    With this new found confidence in tubeless and having referenced Malcolm’s guides I’m going to have a go at converting the non tubeless Mavic XM319 rimes on my 29er using some newly purchased Vittoria Barzo TNT tyres and Gorilla tape.
    2006 Giant XTC
    2010 Giant Defy Advanced
    2016 Boardman Pro 29er
    2016 Pinnacle Lithium 4
    2017 Canondale Supersix Evo
  • zefszefs Posts: 484
    That's what I've been saying about Mavic UST, other companies should follow the same standards/tolerances somehow.
  • skeetamskeetam Posts: 100
    I’ve just fitted my first UST road tubeless set up.
    Mavic tyres on Mavic rims.
    Inflated tyre with a track pump and tyres went straight up even without sealant.
    Removed valve core added sealant with the supplied injector and reinflated. Very easy.
    Having said that I have messed around with tubeless on my MTB and that can be a PITA but that was with non tubeless tyres and due to not checking the tape and interface first.
    Get those right and it’s a doddle.
    With this new found confidence in tubeless and having referenced Malcolm’s guides I’m going to have a go at converting the non tubeless Mavic XM319 rimes on my 29er using some newly purchased Vittoria Barzo TNT tyres and Gorilla tape.

    Same for me. I bought a set of Mavic Ksyrium Elite UST's in January last year and they were a doddle to set up. Only ridden them in the summer so not worn them down enough to try other brand tyres yet.
  • ryan_w-2ryan_w-2 Posts: 1,159
    After suffering yet another puncture on my Hutchinson Fusion 5 Performance 11Storms (one that wouldn't seal and I had to stick a tube in), I have purchased a pair of GP5K TLs in 28c. Hoping with the positive history I've had with GP4Ks, these will perform the same...
    '17 Focus Mares Force 1 --- '19 Cervélo S5 Disc Di2

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  • zefszefs Posts: 484
    I don't think GP5K has more puncture protection than Hutchinson Performance, you were probably unlucky with the puncture.
  • Why didn't you stick a worm in? It's so simple and takes 10 seconds.
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