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E Bike

andyh01andyh01 Posts: 571
edited September 2017 in Commuting general
So how @[email protected] are E bikes - I'm thinking as my commute may increase to 22 miles each way that take about 2 hrs would I be able to reduce this time on an Electric bike to say an hour or under? They're restricted to 15mph but with some peddling assistance could I average faster then that and faster then a normal non electric bike? Or would the weight counteract?

Also would it have enough range to get me to and from work in one go/charge?

Or would a moped/car be better?

Thanks
Andy

Posts

  • AndyH01 wrote:
    So how @[email protected] are E bikes - I'm thinking as my commute may increase to 22 miles each way that take about 2 hrs would I be able to reduce this time on an Electric bike to say an hour or under? They're restricted to 15mph but with some peddling assistance could I average faster then that and faster then a normal non electric bike? Or would the weight counteract?

    Also would it have enough range to get me to and from work in one go/charge?

    Or would a moped/car be better?

    Thanks
    Andy

    short answer moped/car.

    Long answer beyond 15mph the motor cuts out, so even a very fit rider is unlikely to be able to average 22+ mph average!
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    Yeah - they'd help you ride uphill at 15mph but as you say they cut out about 15mph.

    Moped maybe. Car is never the answer....
  • andyh01andyh01 Posts: 571
    Hmm doh I thought I could "top up' the 15mph motor. Are there some us that go to 28 mph ? As the Horny and Bulls daily e grinder are advertised as capable of 28mph?
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    Then they're not a legal e Bike and you'll need insurance licence and proper helmet.
  • andyh01andyh01 Posts: 571
    Yeah I get that if motor got upto that speed on its own be outside current UK legislation which itThink is is due to change as per EU classification.
    I think the Gient UK website says 15mph whereas other (non UK domain) sites suggest upto 28mph.
    Would it be a case of motor been restricted for UK and if n when UK laws and classification changed the or on private land, could the motor restrictions be removed?
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    I think we are on the EU standard ?
    Christ knows if we will change when we aren't in the EU but

    1. I doubt this is in the top million things to do for the government
    2. The papers would have a field day if they did unrestrict the bikes. Cyclists are the nations whipping boys anyway.
  • andyh01andyh01 Posts: 571
    Sorry I wasn't been very clear. It seems in part to do the with vehicle classification. Current EU laws class an while uptown 28mph whereas UK cap at 15.5 before being classed as mechanical propelled. Bit like mopeds restrictions at 35mph? Before been classed as motorcycle with further regulations applying.

    My main question really was are the evokes speed `restricted` so if/when regs change can the restrictions in speed removed or would I need to buy another?

    I've just seen something about the Bomber sold in UK as an off road bike, 4000w motor n uptown 50mph for off rd use (private land, no public access n landowners permission) but also has a button to restrict to 16mph for ( when transporting to private land?) On rd use and marketed as a potential commuter.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    I havent seen any EU laws giving E bikes 28mph - that sounds crazy dangerous to me.

    I cant see e bikes over here being increased - nor should they.

    You're heading down the moped route I think ?
  • dodgydodgy Posts: 2,890
    I think for a person who's already a cyclist, where the e-bike really helps is if your commute is arduous, say exposed to strong winds or hilly and something you do every day >20 miles each way.

    It's not about the speed of your commute on the ebike, it's the state you'll arrive in. I know a few e-commuters in my place and they now commute in 'normal' clothes and they're really enjoying their weekend rides on normal bikes now.
  • slowbikeslowbike Posts: 8,498
    Can't remember who it was posted on here about getting an e-bike - because he tows a trailer with dog(s) in to the office.

    I've chased an e-bike on my return home - not realising it was an e-bike until I passed it ... it was zippy up hill, but once the road turned flat & downhill I easily caught him (on my winter roadbike iirc).
  • Fenix wrote:
    I havent seen any EU laws giving E bikes 28mph - that sounds crazy dangerous to me.

    I cant see e bikes over here being increased - nor should they.

    You're heading down the moped route I think ?

    There is apparently a two new e-bikes specs at least in the EU, for type approval

    L1e-A which is the 15mph etc bikes, but 1KW of power, and L1e-B which is 28mph and 4KW.

    To the best of my knowledge each country is likely to treat each differently, i.e. some will want them as mopeds etc.

    personally I see inappropriate speed on shared paths with e-bikes so the idea of someone with a 28mph e-bike isn't one i'd be very happy about!
  • Park-and-Pedal-time-savings-graph-final.jpgThere is another option.
    Park and pedal.
    Depending where you live and work it can be the fastest option.
    If you have to pay for your parking, then it could well be cheaper.

    Just need a quick rack for fast transition
    https://auxtail.com
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    Or a Brompton ! ;-)
  • kingstongrahamkingstongraham Posts: 16,792
    Slowbike wrote:
    I've chased an e-bike on my return home - not realising it was an e-bike until I passed it ... it was zippy up hill, but once the road turned flat & downhill I easily caught him (on my winter roadbike iirc).

    There's a few I encounter on my way home, and they are definitely not legal. I don't easily catch them.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    If you're in Northern Ireland theres some legal censored up that means no E bikes are legal without tax and proper helmets etc....
  • thistle_thistle_ Posts: 5,303
    There's a few I encounter on my way home, and they are definitely not legal. I don't easily catch them.
    I've seen a few as well. I was slowly catching one while I was doing 20 mph, then we went up a hill and pulled away easily but passed him later on the down ramp from a bridge (the acceleration from the traffic lights obviously wasn't that great).
    Another one I was behind was doing 22 mph and it took some effort to get past (I think his battery may have been going flat - shouldn't admit that).
    In both cases the riders were pedalling, so I think the motor was just assisting.

    To the OP, unless you want an e-bike I'd suggest the park and pedal too. You'll just have to hunt around for a good parking spot, close to the main road that you would drive down (mine is 2 mins off a dual carriageway, just before the congestion usually starts).
  • In Belgium they have two classes of e bike. One limited to the equivalent of about 15 mph. And the other, for which you must have a little number plate, definitely not limited to 15 mph. I made the mistake of racing one of the latter. But, off topic slightly, the more two wheelers on the road the better as far as I am concerned. A few greyhounds in the mix will make cars more wary of treating us like Miss Marples.
  • glenwattglenwatt Posts: 155
    dodgy wrote:
    I think for a person who's already a cyclist, where the e-bike really helps is if your commute is arduous, say exposed to strong winds or hilly and something you do every day >20 miles each way.

    It's not about the speed of your commute on the ebike, it's the state you'll arrive in. I know a few e-commuters in my place and they now commute in 'normal' clothes and they're really enjoying their weekend rides on normal bikes now.

    Dodgy I agree, now being the wrong side of 50 and adding a few too many ounces or so to the rider over the years.

    My weekday ebike commute although not too arduous has a nasty upwards kick on the route home that wears me out over the week. The ebike commutes a few days a week help me to keep enough energy to enjoy weekends on my non powered bikes.
    Glen

    Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional.
  • Isn't the main advantage of e-bike commuting arriving fit to work without the shower and warm down routine? I'm early fifties, 15 st and a full time teacher. Not going to get a whole lot fitter despite extensive weekend road bike excursions.
    Cycling in work clothes and not having to shower, change and go through recovery would be a significant lifestyle improvement. Even at 15 mph.
  • That is just driving then, isn't it?
  • dodgydodgy Posts: 2,890
    If that's driving, I wish more would 'drive'.
  • Slow driving then.
  • dodgydodgy Posts: 2,890
    Are there any other differences between a car and an ebike you can think of?
  • Yes.
  • I've had ebikes for 7 or 8 years now. In my condition (one-leg, old, not fit, fat), it's essential, and keeps me mobile - five or six miles each way is easy, and if I had to work (retired, thankfully) maybe ten each way would be okay.

    A younger, fitter person such as you could do the 20 each way, but you might well need a spare battery, as that is really pushing the range, and you'd certainly need to charge your battery each day once you got to work (several hours charge time).

    Speed? Illegal bikes (e.g. 500w motor usually) will do 20-plus, but their biggest attraction is hill-climbing, particularly for the 'challenged'.

    If you have a look on the Pedelec forum, you'll sometimes find blokes in their sheds who will convert ordinary bikes into ebikes (to your specification), rather than buying the usual ones from manufacturers. One thing the EU nonsense has stopped is the use of throttles, but if you're otherwise fit etc., you probably won't notice their absence.

    A
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