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bye

HoldeyHoldey Posts: 38
edited December 2016 in Road general
bye :cry:
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  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,928
    Is this the same birthday jolly as last time or your next euro holiday funded by us? Might be nice if you actually posted in between rather than just use the forum as a cash cow.
    Most of us ride bikes without getting someone else to fund it.
  • HoldeyHoldey Posts: 38
    as i said if you dont want to donate dont comment. and by the way i have posted but some of you were so nasty last time it put me off. just be quiet if you havent got anything nice to say.
  • StillGoingStillGoing Posts: 5,207
    I agree with Bobbings. If you're chasing sponsorship, there are proper channels to go through. Cyclists in general aren't flush with spare cash and like most people, donations to charity will go to a charity that is personal to them, or appeals to them. Charitable activities that fund the activity, even in part, are a big turn off for the donator. Why should anyone pay for you to have a jolly when that money could be put to better use. If you're funding this yourself, a better direct link to the charity showing the payment going directly to them would be better, rather than an account to amass donations and be used as you like.

    Charities that also don't show what percentage of takings go to fulfilling the charities aims are also a big turn off. Company's like First Knight who have been taking almost 90% of takings to fund the directors whilst claiming to be supporting the rehabilitation of injured military are rife. It would seem anyone can get a registered charity number these days.

    If you want success, organise something that gives something back to the donator.
    I ride a bike. Doesn't make me green or a tree hugger. I drive a car too.
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,928
    Holdey wrote:
    as i said if you dont want to donate dont comment. and by the way i have posted but some of you were so nasty last time it put me off. just be quiet if you havent got anything nice to say.

    So you did it last year and ended up in Paris watching the rugby, having a load of beer with your mates and celebrating your birthday after a leisurely cycle through northern France with all travel arrangements covered by professionals and their expenses paid by someone else. Probably no surprise that you fancy more of the same. However, why not make it a challenge this year that people might be prepared to support rather than just doing the same jolly ride?

    Why not go self supported, panniers, etc., all expenses paid out of your own pocket and a challenging timeline, say L2P (~280 miles) in 24 hours or bust? Then add "every penny of the donations will go directly to the charity" and you might have something...
  • +1 Bobbinogs
    http://www.qsl.net/g4gvb
    Ridley Fenix SL Ultegra Di2 - 2020 (Summer Bike)
    Carrera Virtuoso - 2015 (Winter Bike)
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    ex Focus Cayo Ultegra Di2 - 2016
    ex Giant Defy 1 - 2015
  • Isn't this the same event, having not yet taken place? Only three donations still? Blimey.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    Admirable cause - but rocking up once a year on a forum to ask for donations from strangers probably isn't the best way to get sponsorship. You're far more likely to get donations from people who know you - so clubs, work, pals, family.

    Good luck with it anyway.
  • bianchimoonbianchimoon Posts: 3,942
    edited November 2016
    Quote from website These are sponsored events but sponsorship will cover accommodation, food, transport and of course the all important ticket for the Six Nations’ match.

    shakes head in disbelief :roll:
    All I'm doing a sponsored cycle ride in Mallorca in the spring, inc Puig Major, Colabra etc reckon it will cost me £500, if you can all sponsor me for the grand total of £1500, i guarantee 2/3 of will go to a charity... oh well worth a try.. no pun intended :|
    All lies and jest..still a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest....
  • A trip to France, going on a bike ride, going to the rugby. It sounds like a nice minibreak. I'm not sure where the bit is that means I would pay for a stranger to do it rather than just giving money directly to the charity.
  • slowmartslowmart Posts: 3,983
    @ OP.

    Abuse isn't something you find in here, strong opinions yes, misguided views certainly and people taking the pi55.

    It's a online community, you get back what you put in. In your case you don't contribute to the community but want to use the benovolance and charity to fund your bike ride.

    Do you mind saying how much goes to the charity out of the total raised?

    Would it be more worthwhile for you stay at home and try and find sponsors for a masturbation marathon? There's no "expenses" to cover and all the money goes to the charity. Win win.
    “Give a man a fish and feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and feed him for a lifetime. Teach a man to cycle and he will realize fishing is stupid and boring”

    Desmond Tutu
  • I find it hard enough asking friends and family to sponsor me for things like RL100. So much so I've resolved not to do another charity event like it.

    I admire OP's balls to ask complete strangers. Especially as those strangers had given him a piece of their mind for exactly the same event.
  • mrfpbmrfpb Posts: 4,480
    edited November 2016
    I did few rides for a small charity that heled my family a lot (SOS!SEN if any one is interested) and the first two I chose an organised ride that was a challenge to me, and was not affiliated to another charity. Obviously I had to pay all my own costs for these.

    The third ride was RSL100, and I thought that it might be an idea to get proper charity places so a group could do the ride, but it cost a fortune (£150-£200 per person) and that would still leave lots of other costs to sort out. So it would have required a big fundraising push for the charity to break even on the event. I know lots of people on here will join RSL via charity and make the minimum donation to the charity just because they want the experience. That seems to be more honest an approach than signing up for an event you'd like and then trying to get others to pay for it.
  • I've raised a fair bit of money (ca. £40k) for cancer charities (mostly Teenage Cancer Trust in an attempt to pay back some of the nursing/hospital help we got from them when my son was suffering) and acknowledge some fabulous support from folk on here. I reckon it's cost me 10% the amount of the money raised. Not a single penny of the money raised has gone towards any costs of raising that money. Of the cycling events I've done, none has been easy and most have simply been gruelling starting with Strathpuffer and finishing with Alpe D'HuZez.

    I believe that if you're going to raise money, you need be committed yourself both financially and physically.
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • I've raised a fair bit of money (ca. £40k) for cancer charities

    Jimmy Saville raised £40 million for charities

    Lance Armstrong over $500 million
    I'm sorry you don't believe in miracles
  • I've raised a fair bit of money (ca. £40k) for cancer charities

    Jimmy Saville raised £40 million for charities

    Lance Armstrong over $500 million

    What I find funny is that you probably looked that up....

    You're doing well with this two sentence thing :wink:
    And cut out the unpleasant personal abuse.
    :lol::lol::lol:
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • I believe that if you're going to raise money, you need be committed yourself both financially and physically.
    Indeed. If you are, it's wonderful how generous people will be, even people who don't really know you very well.
  • gethincerigethinceri Posts: 1,086
    I entered a great sportive in October in South Wales, I wonder if the OP did also. I paid to enter and received 2 bananas, some water and a coconut biscuity thingy and Peter's Sausage roll. There was more available but I didn't take the piss. I raised a few quid for it and probably got £1.00 worth of sustenance in return.
    The recipient of the money? Shelter Cymru.

    Shelter Cymru is Wales’ people and homes charity. they believe that a decent secure home is a fundamental right and essential to the health and well-being of people and communities.

    Shelter Cymru provide independent specialist advice, advocacy and legal representation for anyone with housing problems. In 2014, our advisers provided face-to-face help for nearly 16,000 people from all over Wales, helping to prevent homelessness in 86 per cent of cases where it was threatened.

    I'm confident that except for a couple of quid all the money I raised ended in the pockets of the charity.
  • bianchimoonbianchimoon Posts: 3,942
    gethinceri wrote:
    I entered a great sportive in October in South Wales, I wonder if the OP did also. I paid to enter and received 2 bananas, some water and a coconut biscuity thingy and Peter's Sausage roll. There was more available but I didn't take the wee-wee. I raised a few quid for it and probably got £1.00 worth of sustenance in return.
    The recipient of the money? Shelter Cymru.

    Shelter Cymru is Wales’ people and homes charity. they believe that a decent secure home is a fundamental right and essential to the health and well-being of people and communities.

    Shelter Cymru provide independent specialist advice, advocacy and legal representation for anyone with housing problems. In 2014, our advisers provided face-to-face help for nearly 16,000 people from all over Wales, helping to prevent homelessness in 86 per cent of cases where it was threatened.

    I'm confident that except for a couple of quid all the money I raised ended in the pockets of the charity.
    That's the correct way to do it, this "all expenses trip to france to watch the rugby" if you can con people into paying £1,500 is taking the wee wee. The OP should have made it clear in his original post earlier this year and his second attempt here, that his jolly would be paid for out of the money raised and not try to hide it behind "all of the money goes direct to the charity".
    Charity is about people giving in return or doing something for nothing, not something that happens as a byproduct of a free holiday.
    All lies and jest..still a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest....
  • mrfpbmrfpb Posts: 4,480
    I didn't mention to the OP that I actually discovered this forum when I was consdiering the L2B Mooride as a charity event, not a big deal to the people here, but it was challenge to me at the time. I got great advice and I liked the banter, so I kept visiting and posting after the event.

    It's a great forum for advice if you approach it properly. But I never condisered asking the people here for sponsorship.
  • bianchimoonbianchimoon Posts: 3,942
    All lies and jest..still a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest....
  • apreadingapreading Posts: 4,533
    When I do a charity event, I look for one with a self funded option and if they offer that, take it. If I want to do an event which doesnt have that option then I will either a) automatically donate the minimum amount to be raised before asking anyone else for donations or b) tell the donors that I will match whatever they donate. I also try to do it with charities that organise their own events rather than those that use a profit making event organisation.

    I also resent JustGiving and the like for taking a significant cut of the donations. I think VirginMoney is better as its not profit making I believe but still takes a cut to cover 'costs'.

    I always put in the blurb on my donation page that I am doing the thing because I want to and/or because I will enjoy it but that I want to use it as an opportunity to also do some good, which will give me extra motivation to complete what is usually an endurance based event.

    My kids school just sent a load of children to Borneo to do charity work - they all had to raise at least £3,000. I wonder if the charities in Borneo would have been better off with 30 x £3,000 sent to them to pay for local labour rather then sending these children over there...!
  • dinyulldinyull Posts: 2,962
    Effort and reward, says Tom Bell, who raised money for the air ambulance by cycling 350 miles in a week and paid all expenses himself.
    "I'm self-employed, so I lost money. I trained for months.
    "I'll sponsor someone if there's sacrifice.
    "I wouldn't sponsor a mountaineer to climb Everest - but I'd sponsor a lorry driver."

    50 miles a day. Trained for months. Fark off.
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,928

    Yepp, I don't think many people understand that "Charity" events are really just charity opportunities. The big events are run by professional 3rd party event organisers who trouser all the direct profits...and then charge charities 100's of thousands of Pounds for the right to be associated with the event. The charities then shamelessly plug the event and sell places based on minimum funding...but that is primarily to recoup their initial outlay and then hopefully make some on top. Hence, when a rider doesn't eat a couple of sport bars on a charity event they are usually just helping the organisers make more operating profit rather than directly helping a charity's bottom line.

    Then again, it does raise the whole debate about corporate charities. MacMillan's spend millions of Pounds on advertising and all those paid will be getting the full market rate including the TV companies, etc, etc., so a vast amount of cash is being raised just to pay off the process of raising cash. I don't think anyone could argue that the majority of charities do a wonderful job but I prefer to help charities directly...like giving my mum a tenner towards her work with a local hospice.
  • dinyulldinyull Posts: 2,962
    Don't get me started on 'Chuggers'. Students doing what they can to earn a few bob by trying to make you feel guilty about donating to save the tiger or donkey etc.

    The charities have to pay the agency £100 for each person signed up (or is it £250?!) so it takes years for the charities to actually receive a penny - and that all depends on the mug who signed up not cancelling a few months down the line.
  • bianchimoonbianchimoon Posts: 3,942
    it's what happens when marketing companies gets involved in charities. Souls are sold
    All lies and jest..still a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest....
  • bianchimoonbianchimoon Posts: 3,942
    Bobbinogs wrote:

    Yepp, I don't think many people understand that "Charity" events are really just charity opportunities. The big events are run by professional 3rd party event organisers who trouser all the direct profits...and then charge charities 100's of thousands of Pounds for the right to be associated with the event. The charities then shamelessly plug the event and sell places based on minimum funding...but that is primarily to recoup their initial outlay and then hopefully make some on top. Hence, when a rider doesn't eat a couple of sport bars on a charity event they are usually just helping the organisers make more operating profit rather than directly helping a charity's bottom line.

    Then again, it does raise the whole debate about corporate charities. MacMillan's spend millions of Pounds on advertising and all those paid will be getting the full market rate including the TV companies, etc, etc., so a vast amount of cash is being raised just to pay off the process of raising cash. I don't think anyone could argue that the majority of charities do a wonderful job but I prefer to help charities directly...like giving my mum a tenner towards her work with a local hospice.
    I know someone who's just finished a 2 year course in London to get the qualifications to be a MD of a charity... The driving reason is the high salaries associated with these positions, didn't matter too much which charity
    All lies and jest..still a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest....
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    To be fair though - without people taking a salary and working hard - you'd not get the funds.

    Not many of us can afford to work for nothing - and if the job is done right - the salaries should be a tiny part of the fund raising. This will be audited and anyone can see the reports online.

    Organisation always costs - we know this.
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,928
    Yepp, that is one of the difficulties with corporate charities, we all want them to be run well and get a lot of money for the great work done but in order to get a top team you need to pay top dollar...and then that comes out of the funds being raised. I have struggled to come to a good conclusion on this one...which is why I just give my mum the cash as it hurts my head less!
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    Kinda like government and all public spending for that matter?

    Pay peanuts and get monkeys....
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