Forum home Road cycling forum Road beginners

Need to replace my bike

averroesaverroes Posts: 12
edited September 2016 in Road beginners
Hi guys,

been a member on here for a while yet never posted.

Back in 2013 I purchased my first bike. Having zero knowledge about road bikes other than what their intended purpose is, I was totally unable to absorb all the technical terminologies that come with bikes. As with many beginners I felt a bike is just a bike. So I decided to buy a bike not mega expensive that looked aesthetically pleasing. I purchased the Viking Tourino. Looked lovely, I was very proud of my purchase. Unlucky for me it was the first time I had sat on a bike in 15 years and some friends of mine decided it was a good idea to take me on my frist ride from Bradford all the way to Oldham and back via the moors. Talk about throwing someone in the deep end immediately.

I did enjoy the ride albeit a few stops either way due to fatigue. However I never become a fully fledged rider, something always put me off. The feeling of being unable to keep up with fellow riders and the experience of struggling to climb hills what otherwise did not seem so drastically steep really dampened the mood. I have often done a stop start on road cycling due to this same problem and began to wonder, could it be my bike. I am physically fit form althou do lack a little endurance but not so much to make me struggle up not so steep roads. Even the slightest of inclines I would feel.

After reading some topics on here many people have posted and emphasised steering clear of Viking bikes due to these very problems.

So based on your collective knowledge, would it be correct to say I should look to upgrade my bike? Where would upgrading actually improve my experience? I want to be able to climb hills without totally breaking down. I do want to cycle more often as I love it as a form of exercise and the feeling of nature. I have read the gearing on my bike are ridiculously difficult for the average rider up hill so some thought on these issues would help.

Cheers :)

Posts

  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 8,344
    The Viking apart from being made out of scaffolding poles has gearing more suited to the pro,s. You need something with compact chain ring up front and a decent cassette going up to 30 /32 on the back. Ideal bike with this gearing is the Giant Defy 4, another option is a triple chainset as fitted on the Decathlon Triban bikes. The gears will make it easier to get up hills and the frame will be lighter and more forgiving than the viking thing you already have. Hats off to you for persevering with the Viking over the years, upgrade to a better bike and enjoy, go to a giant showroom and have a test ride and make sure you get the correct size for yourself.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • lincolndavelincolndave Posts: 8,390
    Just make sure you get a bike that fits you, with what oxoman posted above about the gearing , and start off by taking it a bit easier, let's say 10 miles to start with, then some 15 / 20 mile runs over the first 4 to 6 weeks, then just up your miles every 2 to 4 weeks, add a few not so steep hills to start with you will need to build up to longer distances and steeper hills
  • averroesaverroes Posts: 12
    Hi guys some great feedback there. Suddenly I dont feel so downbeat lol

    I have set myself a maximum budget of £2000 for a replacement however is it recommended going cheaper (circa £500) for the Giant Defy/Decathlon Triban as oxomon recommended or would I get much more out of a £1500/£2000 bike?

    As for taking it easier to start with as Lincolndave has mentioned, i think that is the wisest move for me however we do have the Route 66 cycling path via Spen Valley Greenway which is fairly flat throughout and I manage to do 9.2 miles either way until I have to climb the steep road parallel to the M606 motorway. It just feels like its never ending :(
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    2 grand would be a huuuge step up from your Viking.

    You can get a nice bike for 600 or so.

    I'd maybe spend up to a grand on a bike that I could use as a winter bike - lets face it - you'll want full guards come winter - leaving you with another grand that you could spend on a lighter summer bike next year.

    A 2 grand bike isnt twice as good as a 1 grand bike.
  • No need to go as far as £2k.

    For example, this bike https://www.canyon.com/en-gb/road/ultim ... l-7-0.html is as much as you (or anyone really) will ever need.
  • slowbikeslowbike Posts: 8,495
    yup - you're right, you need to replace your bike.
    If you like riding your bike you're more likely to ride it.

    Gearing can be changed - however, you should probably look at something with a compact chainset on at least.
    Loads of bikes around - I wouldn't spend 2k on it - up to 1k will sort you out something nice - and a frame worth keeping as you upgrade the component parts.

    Best advice I can give is to go and get on a bike and try it - your local bike shops will help with this - just don't buy the first one you sit on (and don't forget - saddles can be changed too) - make sure you try a few - from a few different places. Most places will do a rudimentery bike fit for nothing - that should be enough for you at the moment.
  • averroesaverroes Posts: 12
    you guys are awesome, thank you very much for your contributions.

    Would it be wise to look at aero bikes also? Since I will be in the market for a new bike anyway no harm in looking is there. Majority of my rides (well so I hope) shall be exercise/leisure via route 99 or country roads. Aiming to start with 1-2 rides per week.

    Would an aero bike be less comfortable to ride likewise would it be better uphill?
  • averroes wrote:
    you guys are awesome, thank you very much for your contributions.

    Would it be wise to look at aero bikes also? Since I will be in the market for a new bike anyway no harm in looking is there. Majority of my rides (well so I hope) shall be exercise/leisure via route 99 or country roads. Aiming to start with 1-2 rides per week.

    Would an aero bike be less comfortable to ride likewise would it be better uphill?

    I would say no. For your riding there's no point. Aero bikes in general will be more harsh and less forgiving to ride and will be heavier so slower up hill. You'll do great with a £1k-ish road bike.
  • averroesaverroes Posts: 12
    Right need to go test some bikes out now :) . Thank you very much for everyones valuable replies.
  • lincolndavelincolndave Posts: 8,390
    Averroes, you would properly better having a look at endurance / gran fondo bikes, they are a bit more for relaxed cycling unless you want to start racing, good luck let us know how you get on
  • chrisaonabikechrisaonabike Posts: 1,919
    It would also be worth taking a look at this YouTube video, which explains everything you need to know about fast bikes:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlJjbnrdjjw
    Is the gorilla tired yet?
  • lakesludditelakesluddite Posts: 1,321
    Probably a good time to buy now - the 2016 models are starting to get discounted in preparation for the 2017 models to supersede them (or will be in a month or so). I would also echo that for your first upgrade, £2K is a bit high (but hey, if you can afford it, why not?)
    Get to a good bike shop, and if you don't know which those are, ask someone who does (either mates or on here). If you are Bradford based, I would have thought All Terrain in Salt Mills, or nip over to Ilkley Cycles?
  • averroesaverroes Posts: 12
    lol Lincolndave, I think racing maybe a tad while yet however if the uphills arent as difficult as what i currently experience, I would rather prefer a road race bike maybe as they look aesthetically nicer. I do however want to eventually start timing my runs once I get some regular rides in.

    Chris thank you very much for the link buddy, very helpful indeed albeit quite funny lol.

    LakesLuddite, you saved me from a question and a possible trip to Leeds as im not familiar with many bike shops in Bradford. If im not mistaken All Terrain is not far from where I lived not long ago so might give them a butchers over weekend. :)
  • balthazarbalthazar Posts: 1,566
    I even bore myself going on about this but don't overlook what you're wearing in preparing this investment.

    Well fitting, functional cycling clothes will have at least as big a benefit to you as a nice bike. Depending on what you have already, try to budget enough for at least a good pair of bib shorts, a couple of jerseys in different weights, some winter(ish) tights, a close-fitting winter jacket or gilet, maybe a waterproof. A couple of hundred quid at least for tangibly nicer bike rides you really enjoy, rather than an arcane specification-jump to a fancier bike that you'll never notice.
  • averroesaverroes Posts: 12
    Hi Balthazar, thank you for the reply.

    I couldnt agree more with what you have said. I realised this the hard way hence investing in a few sets of clothes. I have some padded bib leggings with tops to match (more winter wear with the fleecy lining), also have some cycling padded shorts with matching tops for summer, a nice pair of specialised cycling shoes, a few different pairs of gloves (still get the odd cramps but i put this down to lack of riding) also have a winter cycling jacket.
  • Jerry185Jerry185 Posts: 143
    For hill training, an excellent training addition is spinning. Practice your pedal technique and standing power without worrying about traffic/people/weather.
    BTW in the same mindset as you, averroes; I have a Decathlon Triban 540, which is a very good bike, but just too good to spend £1K on replacing with a 'proper' carbon bike. Trouble is, I like (ha!) sportives with serious hills and the 34/28 set up is a bit grinding
  • balthazarbalthazar Posts: 1,566
    averroes wrote:
    Hi Balthazar, thank you for the reply.

    I couldnt agree more with what you have said. I realised this the hard way hence investing in a few sets of clothes. I have some padded bib leggings with tops to match (more winter wear with the fleecy lining), also have some cycling padded shorts with matching tops for summer, a nice pair of specialised cycling shoes, a few different pairs of gloves (still get the odd cramps but i put this down to lack of riding) also have a winter cycling jacket.

    In that case, game on! Get thee a fancy bike..! With your budget I'd suggest spending up to about a grand or so (unless there's something that really appeals) and keep the rest for the inevitable extra bits and bobs you'll buy over the next year or two. £800 bikes are very good, beyond that you're paying incrementally for lightness, rarity, shininess(etc...) and bespoke elements.

    Or drop megabucks on a bespoke steel bike from Feather or Mather or Donhou, and somehow convince yourself it only cost "about 2K". Which is what I'd do
  • averroesaverroes Posts: 12
    Ok so bought myself a bike today. Did scoff most of the budget but I am happy with the purchase.

    Bought a Giant Propel Advance Pro 2, come with pretty much everything I could have asked for, would have been happier if they offered the ultegra as opposed to the 105 but hey you cant have everything.

    Just need a nice set of clipless pedals and im out this weekend, cant wait :)
  • averroes wrote:
    Hi guys some great feedback there. Suddenly I dont feel so downbeat lol

    I have set myself a maximum budget of £2000 for a replacement however is it recommended going cheaper (circa £500) for the Giant Defy/Decathlon Triban as oxomon recommended or would I get much more out of a £1500/£2000 bike?

    As for taking it easier to start with as Lincolndave has mentioned, i think that is the wisest move for me however we do have the Route 66 cycling path via Spen Valley Greenway which is fairly flat throughout and I manage to do 9.2 miles either way until I have to climb the steep road parallel to the M606 motorway. It just feels like its never ending :(

    Your lucky, it is tidy advice. However when ever I ask for advice on something, the feedback I recieve is invariably censored , sarcastic or downright unsuitable. I assume its because my posts come across as stupid (and they probably are), but stupid people need good advice to educate them so they become unstupid. It is often said on beginner forums "no question too stupid, just ask".

    Anyway best of luck with whatever bike you get. I have a full sus bike and a full carbon road bike. Each were about the £1600 mark and have been awsome. BUT..........


    slowbike wrote:
    yup - you're right, you need to replace your bike.
    If you like riding your bike you're more likely to ride it.

    Gearing can be changed - however, you should probably look at something with a compact chainset on at least.
    Loads of bikes around - I wouldn't spend 2k on it - up to 1k will sort you out something nice - and a frame worth keeping as you upgrade the component parts.

    Best advice I can give is to go and get on a bike and try it - your local bike shops will help with this - just don't buy the first one you sit on (and don't forget - saddles can be changed too) - make sure you try a few - from a few different places. Most places will do a rudimentery bike fit for nothing - that should be enough for you at the moment.

    Even at that price, saddles are typically awful, and in the case of my Scott road bike, so were the wheels. I find the saddles are like sitting on a small lump of rock and get something more comfy. £30 can get something suitable for my censored .
    As for wheels, avoid American Classic if you ever do change wheels.
    I'm not a racist! My f'in car is black!
  • Just an update, did not collect the Propel in the end. What seemed and Id still stand by to be a cheap bike, it wasnt the right bike after all even though the gentleman in the shop convinced me it was.

    Nonetheless, ordering a Giant Defy Advance 1. Think ill be more suited to this bike especially with the ratios at 11-32/34-50
  • LotaLota Posts: 9
    Congratulation! I like all Defy bikes ;)
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