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Giant Defy 1

TashmanTashman Posts: 2,775
edited August 2016 in Road beginners
Hi, I'm a big guy (6'2" 17st) and have the possibility of purchasing a 2010 Giant Defy 1 from a friend.

Til now i've occasionally bimbled about on my 20 year old MTB but after having knee surgery earlier in the year i want to get out and get fit again with a lower load than running.

2 main questions, what would be a reasonable price for the bike, and would it be a suitable machine for me to get going on, or would i need something more robust?

Posts

  • TashmanTashman Posts: 2,775
    I've also enlisted for the London to Brighton charity ride next June so that i have a target to drive me. TIA
  • homers_doublehomers_double Posts: 6,749
    As a starter bike it'll be fine and don't worry about the weight unless you plan on bulldozing through potholes etc.

    Price wise a couple of hundred at the max, probably less as it's 6/7 years old now and might need a bit spending on it unless you know he's looked after it.

    Then it's a matter of saving for your next new shiny bike!
    Advocate of disc brakes.
  • lukesweenlukesween Posts: 13
    As said, no more than £200 I'd say. Get it running nicely with comfortable saddle and decent tyres, then enjoy it. No point spending more than you need to if you don't enjoy it in the end
  • gimplgimpl Posts: 268
    I have a Defy 1 and weigh much the same as you so you'll be fine.

    Should be a great bike to get you going on and subsequently becomes your 'Wet Bike' when you upgrade next year :mrgreen:
  • izzaizza Posts: 1,561
    As of today, there is a sale of Giant Defy's by Giant UK so why get an older model?
  • bungle73bungle73 Posts: 748
    izza wrote:
    As of today, there is a sale of Giant Defy's by Giant UK so why get an older model?

    An older model than 2010? :?
  • Dan WaltonDan Walton Posts: 147
    bungle73 wrote:
    izza wrote:
    As of today, there is a sale of Giant Defy's by Giant UK so why get an older model?

    An older model than 2010? :?

    Because the ones currently are on sale are 2016 models? He's looking at a 2010 model. A 2010 model is older than a 2016 model.
  • bungle73bungle73 Posts: 748
    Dan Walton wrote:
    bungle73 wrote:
    izza wrote:
    As of today, there is a sale of Giant Defy's by Giant UK so why get an older model?

    An older model than 2010? :?

    Because the ones currently are on sale are 2016 models? He's looking at a 2010 model. A 2010 model is older than a 2016 model.

    I mis-read that.
  • Dan WaltonDan Walton Posts: 147
    bungle73 wrote:
    Dan Walton wrote:
    bungle73 wrote:
    izza wrote:
    As of today, there is a sale of Giant Defy's by Giant UK so why get an older model?

    An older model than 2010? :?

    Because the ones currently are on sale are 2016 models? He's looking at a 2010 model. A 2010 model is older than a 2016 model.

    I mis-read that.

    :wink:
  • tjm160tjm160 Posts: 35
    I would personally say the answer depends on why you are seeking a road bike, how much you intend to ride and available budget.

    Finally too old, fat and unfit to run any more, I turned to road riding in 2013. I too am 6'2" and at the time was 18 stone. I was fortunate to be able to afford a new Defy 1 and covering 4,000km in six months, dropped to a more manageable 15 stone.

    If you are just looking to dip a toe in the water of riding and budget is an issue, a maximum of a couple of hundred pounds (depending on condition) on the second hand bike and you can hardly go wrong. Equally, and before any potential condition issues, the bike is already pretty old in bike terms and as such, is not going to be anywhere near as nice a ride or feel as a new one.
    Tim
  • TashmanTashman Posts: 2,775
    Thanks,

    i have agreed to take it for £200. It has upgraded wheels too apparently, athough at this point i don't know what they are. My friend is an ace engineer and is giving it the once over before i take delivery :) Just looking to try my hand at it really but wanted something better than my 20 year old cheap mountain bike. Here's to many happy miles!
  • TashmanTashman Posts: 2,775
    Taking delivery this evening - Happy Days :)
  • homers_doublehomers_double Posts: 6,749
    Nice one mate, enjoy it.
    Advocate of disc brakes.
  • TashmanTashman Posts: 2,775
    This came with SPD pedals, which i have no shoes for. As a newbie would i be better off getting shoes or replacing the pedals? I was thinking of touring pedals so i could possibly progress to clipping in once i'm happy covering some miles?
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 9,049
    It's entirely up to you, but spd touring pedals are easier to get on with when it comes to walking with the cleats and also cleat life. I currently use shimano A520's touring style spd,s and shimano rt32 touring style shoes, neither look like they belong on a mtb so look ok on a road bike. With spd,s your foot is in one position so makes for better pedalling, you just need to think ahead a little to clip out, otherwise you will have a failed to unclip moment. There are different type's of cleat system but spd are the more robust when it comes to cleat as they are metal as opposed to plastic. Decathlon, Wiggle, Evan,s etc all do cheapish shoes so worth having a look around, expect sizing to a bit strange it's usual to go up a size. Good luck with the new bike and enjoy.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • TashmanTashman Posts: 2,775
    I was looking at the A530, but the M530 looks a sleeker
  • bungle73bungle73 Posts: 748
    Get the SH-56 cleats. They're much easier to get out.
  • lincolndavelincolndave Posts: 9,105
    Spd pedals are brilliant, but if i was you I would start off with some flat pedals, then look out for shoes and cleats
    Good luck and enjoy the bike
  • TashmanTashman Posts: 2,775
    Just back from Holibobs, new pedals fitted and used once before getting away, flat definitely fine for now but don't think it'll be long til I have an urge to 'clip in'
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