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Bike for beginner

Dundee62Dundee62 Posts: 5
edited April 2016 in Road beginners
I am wanting to get a bike through cycle 2 work scheme. Not sure what i want but a work colleague has recommended a hybrid with front suspension.

My use would be mainly cycle tracks locally, maybe eventually commuting to work. My kids will be getting bikes so probably outwith them. Went to my local bike shop who were very helpful and recommended a giant roam 0 2015 qhich is 650. They also had a giant roam 1 2015 for 599.

Does anybody have exp of this bike? I notice it has puncture resistant tyres? Unsure what these mean?

Thanks

Posts

  • markhewitt1978markhewitt1978 Posts: 7,614
    edited April 2016
    Dundee62 wrote:
    I am wanting to get a bike through cycle 2 work scheme. Not sure what i want but a work colleague has recommended a hybrid with front suspension.

    Has he told you why he makes that recommendation? Specifically about the suspension?
    My use would be mainly cycle tracks locally, maybe eventually commuting to work.

    Cycle tracks such as tarmac or light gravel? You do *not* need suspension for those. It will weigh a tonne and rob your energy until you literally die. For gravel paths and the likes your tyres are all you need to smooth it out.

    Suspension is really for mountain bikes going over really really rough off road terrain, big rocks, tree roots and the likes.

    A hybrid is a reasonable idea. Have a look at the Trek FX series.
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,928
    When I bought a hybrid I paid about £30 extra for some suspended forks. A year or so later I was chatting to someone in the bike shop saying that I couldn't really detect any benefit that the sus was giving me and asked what alternatives I had. He had a brainwave, popped into the back of the shop and came out with the original steel forks that my bike was supplied with (apparently they ship the bikes with standard forks and the 'upgraded' sus forks, leaving the LBS to sort them out as part of the final build process). Hence, I walked out with the standard forks for nothing. I went home, weighed it all (like a saddo) and then swapped the forks out. I can honestly say that there was no degradation in 'performance' or comfort. In fact, the bike seemed to handle a lot better and felt a little more nimble. The weight saving was 1.5kg.

    I have since ridden the bike on gravel paths, forest trails, etc., without an issue. It is just a case of using the right tyres for the job, at the right pressure. The bike is no MTB dirt monkey, but then I don't use it as one. It makes an excellent beer bike, btw.
  • Dundee62Dundee62 Posts: 5
    Dundee62 wrote:
    I am wanting to get a bike through cycle 2 work scheme. Not sure what i want but a work colleague has recommended a hybrid with front suspension.

    Has he told you why he makes that recommendation? Specifically about the suspension?
    My use would be mainly cycle tracks locally, maybe eventually commuting to work.

    Cycle tracks such as tarmac or light gravel? You do *not* need suspension for those. It will weigh a tonne and rob your energy until you literally die. For gravel paths and the likes your tyres are all you need to smooth it out.

    Suspension is really for mountain bikes going over really really rough off road terrain, big rocks, tree roots and the likes.

    A hybrid is a reasonable idea. Have a look at the Trek FX series.

    Any recommendations from the trek fx series or what to look out for? I'm really unsure what to look for. The suspension was recommended for a much smoother ride. Assuming it would help with being heavier also?

    http://www.spokescycles.net is the company i am planning to buy from. Appreciate any advice.

    Thanks
  • Dundee62Dundee62 Posts: 5
    Bobbinogs wrote:
    When I bought a hybrid I paid about £30 extra for some suspended forks. A year or so later I was chatting to someone in the bike shop saying that I couldn't really detect any benefit that the sus was giving me and asked what alternatives I had. He had a brainwave, popped into the back of the shop and came out with the original steel forks that my bike was supplied with (apparently they ship the bikes with standard forks and the 'upgraded' sus forks, leaving the LBS to sort them out as part of the final build process). Hence, I walked out with the standard forks for nothing. I went home, weighed it all (like a saddo) and then swapped the forks out. I can honestly say that there was no degradation in 'performance' or comfort. In fact, the bike seemed to handle a lot better and felt a little more nimble. The weight saving was 1.5kg.

    I have since ridden the bike on gravel paths, forest trails, etc., without an issue. It is just a case of using the right tyres for the job, at the right pressure. The bike is no MTB dirt monkey, but then I don't use it as one. It makes an excellent beer bike, btw.

    Thanks. Whats a beer bike?
  • markhewitt1978markhewitt1978 Posts: 7,614
    Dundee62 wrote:
    Any recommendations from the trek fx series or what to look out for? I'm really unsure what to look for.

    They are all pretty similar just as they get more expensive you get better components, more gear ratios, some have disc brakes etc.
    The suspension was recommended for a much smoother ride. Assuming it would help with being heavier also?

    Smoother yes, but at a cost of it being harder to pedal, especially up hill. It's the wheels which take the weight not the suspension.
  • navrig2navrig2 Posts: 1,566

    Cycle tracks such as tarmac or light gravel? You do *not* need suspension for those. It will weigh noticeably more and make riding more effort. For gravel paths and the likes your tyres are all you need to smooth it out.

    Suspension is typically for mountain bikes going over rough off road terrain, big rocks, tree roots and the likes or for someone who suffers from discomfort cause by vibration and shocks coming up though the handlebars.

    A hybrid is a reasonable idea. Have a look at the Trek FX series.

    Pedantically fixed it for you.

    My missus couldn't cope with straight forks on anything other than smooth tarmac. She uses a hybrid with front suspension and locks out the forks on smooth roads.

    She lives with the extra effort and regards it as additional training.
  • singletonsingleton Posts: 1,649
    Dundee62 wrote:
    Thanks. Whats a beer bike?

    A bike for riding to the pub, leaving outside and then riding home.
  • Dundee62Dundee62 Posts: 5
    Thanks for the advice all just been back and in the end went with the trek allant 7.4. Was that or the fx. Preferred the disk brakes of the allant. Now just to buy what i need for with the bike. Helmet, mud guards, jacket etc. What do most people wear when cycling? Dont feel too confident wearing cycling shorts.

    Thanks.
  • markhewitt1978markhewitt1978 Posts: 7,614
    http://www.trekbikes.com/gb/en_GB/bikes ... ant/c/B445

    Looks like a pretty nice bike! Not sure what the difference is to the FX looks the same to me :D
  • markhewitt1978markhewitt1978 Posts: 7,614
    Dundee62 wrote:
    Now just to buy what i need for with the bike. Helmet, mud guards, jacket etc.

    Helmet, yes. Also; water bottles & bottle cages. Pump to strap to your bike. Stand pump to keep at home. Small saddle bag for the back which includes, spare inner tube (or patch kit or both), tyre levers. Mud guards aren't compulsory but can help in bad weather.
    What do most people wear when cycling? Dont feel too confident wearing cycling shorts.

    Anything which is reasonably tight fitting will be fine, just to keep loose flapping fabric away from the chain where it'll get caught, or worse, dirty. Cycle specific clothing will be more comfortable for longer runs but it's by no means compulsory!
  • http://www.trekbikes.com/gb/en_GB/bikes/city-bikes/urban-commuter-bikes/allant/c/B445

    Looks like a pretty nice bike! Not sure what the difference is to the FX looks the same to me :D

    According to the guy in the bike shop nothing apart from the disk brakes which I believe are better? Rode the 7.2 allant and felt a good bike. Wife has went for the exact same bike.
  • Dundee62 wrote:
    Now just to buy what i need for with the bike. Helmet, mud guards, jacket etc.

    Helmet, yes. Also; water bottles & bottle cages. Pump to strap to your bike. Stand pump to keep at home. Small saddle bag for the back which includes, spare inner tube (or patch kit or both), tyre levers. Mud guards aren't compulsory but can help in bad weather.

    Thanks any recommendations on a retailer to use? amazon good to use? the tyres are apparently puncture resistant. Will I still need spares? Any recommendations on a book to read for care and maintenance of a bike? Hoping to get a recommendation for a decent lock and how to use it? Don't want my bike getting stolen. Thanks.
    What do most people wear when cycling? Dont feel too confident wearing cycling shorts.

    Anything which is reasonably tight fitting will be fine, just to keep loose flapping fabric away from the chain where it'll get caught, or worse, dirty. Cycle specific clothing will be more comfortable for longer runs but it's by no means compulsory!

    Thanks. Will maybe just try and get Jean shorts. Maybe once I feel more comfortable I can get bike shorts as do hope to build up eventually to long runs. Hoping to be able to do the 27 mile cycle route in my city regularly once used to it.
  • pedarbypedarby Posts: 28
    I'm new to cycling too and also had reservations about all the Lycra cycling gear - but since the first pair of tights I've not looked back. Not only is cycling gear offer less drag but it also much more comfortable. If you have baggy clothes you will be like a sail in the wind!!

    As we are moving into spring/summer if you are doing a reasonable number of miles you should definitely give serious thought to getting some bib shorts....there's a reason the majority of road cyclists wear the gear!
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