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How to Find Comfortable Road Shoes?

drewesqdrewesq Posts: 137
edited March 2016 in Road buying advice
I have tried 2 lots of budget road shoes now - NW Jet Evo & DHB R 1.0. The first I bought under bad advice as they were a size too small, so I bought the cheaper DHB. While the DHB fit really well they start to make the bottom of my foot ache where the cleats screw in.

I was hoping that maybe a good pair of gel inserts or something might work?

Or, maybe I just need to get a new pair?

I'm happy to throw a bit of cash at the problem as this is now the only thing holding me back and I plan to spend a LOT of time in the saddle this summer!

Any advice will be useful, thanks :):)
Cannondale CAADX Disc 2014 Tiagra - Blue
Charge Plug 0
Voodoo Bizango 2015
Ridgeback World Tour (mainly for commuting and holidays)
:mrgreen:

Posts

  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 17,139
    Go to a shop and try some on.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • drewesqdrewesq Posts: 137
    PBlakeney wrote:
    Go to a shop and try some on.

    While this is sound advice I don't see how I'll know if they'll not make my foot ache just from trying a pair on in a shop.

    Perhaps I worded the title badly. I should have asked if anyone else had the same issue with a 'hot spot' around where the cleat is, and if they did, have they found either a pair of shoes which were more comfortable around that area or another solution like a pair of insoles...

    :)
    Cannondale CAADX Disc 2014 Tiagra - Blue
    Charge Plug 0
    Voodoo Bizango 2015
    Ridgeback World Tour (mainly for commuting and holidays)
    :mrgreen:
  • redvisionredvision Posts: 2,753
    drewesq wrote:
    PBlakeney wrote:
    Go to a shop and try some on.

    While this is sound advice I don't see how I'll know if they'll not make my foot ache just from trying a pair on in a shop.

    Perhaps I worded the title badly. I should have asked if anyone else had the same issue with a 'hot spot' around where the cleat is, and if they did, have they found either a pair of shoes which were more comfortable around that area or another solution like a pair of insoles...

    :)

    Hot spot is a common problem. A variety of things can cause it, it may be your cleat position rather than the shoes.

    Don't forget your foot will also swell during exercise, so make sure you don't have the shoes tightened too much.

    Anyway, before you spend money on another set of shoes I would try some extra insoles.
    Do you have high arches? If so take a look at the specialized footbeds.
  • paulwoodpaulwood Posts: 226
    Shoes, like saddles are very personal things. The ones that work for your mate or get the best reviews may not be the right ones for you

    As far as shoes goes there is really no substitute to going to a shop with a big range and spending ages trying them on. I tend to try them with a thicker pair of socks than usual to try and compensate for swelling feet.
  • marcusjbmarcusjb Posts: 2,412
    Yep - hot foot is very common. Most people will suffer from it a little once in a while, especially on longer rides.

    Shoe fit is essential - as above, feet do swell, so not too tight to begin with. Look at insoles. I use Superfeet, but Specialized have some good offerings as well.

    Cleat position makes a massive difference to hot foot - without seeing your setup, it is hard to say; but traditional wisdom is to move the cleat a little further back (and then make relevant changes to other bits of the bike fit as required).

    Good socks make a difference as well! Again, have to fit well and not move about on your foot.

    Good luck, it's not a nice feeling, but it can be eliminated or at the very least minimised without having to spend a fortune on new shoes (on the assumption they do actually fit you).
  • crankycrankcrankycrank Posts: 1,830
    Agree with all the above advise and would add that I've also seen that quite a few riders need a wider fitting shoe. Many cycling shoes particularly the Italian brands are very narrow and can also cause hot spots around the balls of the feet and other problems. Most mfrs. now make wide versions and I would recommend just trying them on. This may not be your problem but worth checking out and it's best to try on shoes after you've been out riding awhile after your feet have (as mentioned) swelled a bit.
  • LorezLorez Posts: 23
    This is of interest to me, I've been getting discomfort in my left foot and not sure if it's the shoe fit or other factors. What are the signs of hot foot?
  • marcusjbmarcusjb Posts: 2,412
    Lorez wrote:
    This is of interest to me, I've been getting discomfort in my left foot and not sure if it's the shoe fit or other factors. What are the signs of hot foot?

    The ball of your foot feels like it is burning. Even when you stop and take off your shoes etc., it can still feel like it is very hot.

    It is not uncommon in long distance cycling and I have suffered from it on rare occasions, but know people who've had to pack on rides due to the pain.
  • Ste_SSte_S Posts: 1,173
    PBlakeney wrote:
    Go to a shop and try some on.

    Or alternatively, buy from an online retailer with a good returns properly. Most shops in my experience don't have a good selection of shoes or have a wide range of sizes for you to try
  • LorezLorez Posts: 23
    marcusjb wrote:
    Lorez wrote:
    This is of interest to me, I've been getting discomfort in my left foot and not sure if it's the shoe fit or other factors. What are the signs of hot foot?

    The ball of your foot feels like it is burning. Even when you stop and take off your shoes etc., it can still feel like it is very hot.

    It is not uncommon in long distance cycling and I have suffered from it on rare occasions, but know people who've had to pack on rides due to the pain.

    Yep that's what it feels like. I just thought it was a tight shoe and the cold.
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