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Finding it hard to choose next bike

KemmsKemms Posts: 7
edited November 2015 in Road buying advice
Hi Everyone

I've had a Giant Defy 3 for a few years and want to upgrade earlier next year. I'm finding it daunting to understand what bikes would suit my needs.

Most of my rides are between 20 and 70 miles. I live in a very hilly area. I do a few Sportives such as the Dartmoor Classic. I know I want something that is pretty stiff, but I don't want anything that will cripple me after a few hours in the saddle.

I also plan to do a couple of distance rides next year over two or three days.

I've tried a Giant TCR Advanced, a Defy Advanced and a Cannondale Super Six. But I was only able to ride around a small car park so I wasn't able to get a true feel.

Any suggestions or advice would be appreciated.

Regards

Mark

Posts

  • gmaczgmacz Posts: 343
    I have the defy 3 for a few years as well, 2011 triple.
    I have just purchased the tcr advanced 3 in the winter sales.
    I see it as a decent affordable upgrade.
    Have the same set up on both bikes in terms of rider position and will take it from there.
  • Some clues on why you want to upgrade?

    The test rides were on more race orientated geometry bikes? Looking for a lower ride position?
  • KemmsKemms Posts: 7
    gmacz - do you find your TCR comfortable.

    Fat-boy-roubaix - I want to upgrade because I want a bike that is faster on the flat and hills, which is lighter and has better components. I want to continue to get better as a rider and do more events.
  • gmaczgmacz Posts: 343
    edited November 2015
    The tcr top tube and stem are longer but the length is lost in the handlebars.
    Older defy handlebars are a lot bigger than the tcr ones.
    The rest of the bike is similar except the handlebar to floor height which is 3cm lower and has more spacers for adjusting lower.
    Stem has more angle, upside down and it sits higher than the defy in same position.
    Real difference is rider position and you can easily adjust this with the supplied various thickness spacers if you race or play.
  • Do you feel "upright" on the Defy or have you removed a few spacers?

    I have Supersix that is pretty much slammed down to the headset. I went form a Roubaix which is specialized version of the Defy and it felt quite a difference in position.

    You have a few different bike segment's and most manufacturers cater for all of them.

    Relaxed
    Specialized Roubaix
    Cannondale Synapse
    Giant Defy
    Merida Ride

    More Aggressive
    Specialized Tarmac
    Cannondale Supersix
    Giant TCR
    Merida Scultra

    Then you can add CX and Gravel.

    Manufactures will upsell you based on the carbon layup, weight of bike and the groupset/wheels.

    For instance all Supersix Evo frames are identical until you get up to the Nano's the extra £££'s are for the parts added to the bike.

    I think but not sure Giant changes the frames as you go up levels.
  • KemmsKemms Posts: 7
    Fat Boy Roubaix - thank you. Yes I do feel upright and ride more on the hoods than the drops. To show my lack of knowledge I don't know anything about spacers? :lol:

    The TCR felt short but it's a completely different bike, plus it was a different size to my Defy. I bought my Defy online and used their size chart which said I needed XL. The Giant size chart now says I'm a Large. So that's probably why it felt short. The Super Six I rode didn't feel so different than my Defy.

    I also tried a Synapse which although was nice was not stiff enough for what I want. I like Cannondale but I think you get better components for you money with Giant. But a Super Six with 105 maybe a possibility.

    The dealer I went to doesn't allow a proper test ride. You can only ride around a small test area. So I need to go somewhere else to get a decent test ride.
  • Ignore the Supersix feeling like the Defy it comes with a huge amount of spacers see the lump above the stem that's how much he lowered the bars from how it arrives and there is still a fair stack underneath.

    Not many shops will offer long test rides. Evans cycles were\are offering guaranteed the right bike 30 days returns but you had better check the T&C's

    Relaxed bikes don't really mean slow. How do you feel in the drops on the Defy?

    Cannondale%20SuperSix%20Evo%20105%20-%20riding%201.jpg?itok=XXbPtQTw
  • gmaczgmacz Posts: 343
    My defy is xl as well.
    Tcr chart had me in the large range, I got an xl.
    Stem has spacers below it, remove stem, remove spacer, and put spacer on top of stem and the height is lowered.
    This is the same as the defy, just bigger and more of them.
  • KemmsKemms Posts: 7
    The drops didn't used to be very comfortable because I used to have a big fat belly in the way! That has reduced and is continuing to reduce. So I'm ok with the drops. I do have a back injury from a road accident but it's not too bad.

    A fast relaxed bike would be ideal.
  • KemmsKemms Posts: 7
    Thanks both for the explanation of spacers
  • defridedefride Posts: 277
    [quote="Fat-Boy-Roubaix
    For instance all Supersix Evo frames are identical until you get up to the Nano's the extra £££'s are for the parts added to the bike.

    [/quote]

    There's a Super Six, Super Six Evo, Super Six Evo Hi Mod and then the Nano.

    Not sure how much difference there is between the Evo and Evo Hi Mod in real terms. 200g or so weight wise, different carbon and lay up, would likely make a difference to the way they feel to ride but not necessarily a huge difference. Nano is said to be 60g lighter than a Hi Mod, doesn't sound like much but again it depends what they've done to achieve that. The resin for instance could be quiet different and affect the ride in some way, stiffer for instance.

    Anyways, have just bought a Hi Mod and been very impressed, comfortable and power transfer is outstanding, really notice the difference between it and the Cube Agree that's now relegated to winter duty. Not ridden a standard Evo.

    If you're not that familiar with bikes and aren't settled on your ride position it may be worth finding a good bike fitter. Fit is the most important part of the equation then once you have an idea of your Stack and Reach requirements you'll have a better idea as to which bikes may suit.

    My advice after that would be compromise to an extent on the components if it'll get you a substantially better set of wheels. You'll notice that more than going from 105 to Ultegra for example.

    Best of luck
  • KemmsKemms Posts: 7
    Defride - I did get a fit done with my Defy but I now know it wasn't very good. I took about 15 minutes. But I was none the wiser then.

    A friend recommended a local Trek dealer. I went to see them. They were very helpful but unfortunately didn't have anything for me to try. But they did take various measurement from me to be able to what size frame I would need. I liked the Domane but I now don't think it's what I want, so from a Trek point of view I'd look at the Modane.

    Thanks Fat-Boy-Roubaix and gmacz as well for your posts. You have help me. I think I need to get test ride on the TCR and SuperSix Evo in a couple of sizes as my height is right on the edge of two sizes.

    I have heard that Cannondale aren't very good at honouring their warranty. Anybody had any experience with Cannondale warranty good or bad?

    Thank to all again.

    Mark
  • letap73letap73 Posts: 1,608
    I own a giant advanced defy and a himod supersix evo.
    The defy I bought first, it doesn't feel particularly special in any one way, it is is very comfortable and the handling is very neutral.
    The evo was bought to replace the defy does feel special, it handles brilliantly and responsively -it also feels comfortable though not as comfortable as the defy.
    But, on my commute to work 15 miles - very up and down with no major hills - the faster times have been achieved with the Defy. I guess the brilliance of the Defy is that it was designed with me in mind (not an ultra fit athlete) hence, although it does not in anyway appear remarkable, it does appear to maximise my performance. The Evo is designed with the pro tour in mind (or those with a greater reach in comparison with their Stack (inside leg measurement)).

    With regards to warranty claims, your lbs is first port of call - I am lucky to have dealt with EPIC cycles with regards to my issue with the Cannondale. Although, I can potentially sense the evo pressfit 30 bottom bracket should be better than the Giant pressfit 86 bottom bracket - the pressfit 86 is more reliable (less prone to creaks) than the pressfit 30 due to frame tolerances in the bottom bracket. If you are a pretty handy bike mechanic then the pressfit 30 should present no issues.
  • Seriously read letaps post, which is excellent

    I would go for higher up the range relaxed bike vs aggressive bikes. At the very worst you can slam the stem and even put a negative rise stem if you felt the need.

    I love my Cannondale but really it is not that practical for everyday riding that I mostly do such as commuting. My Supersix Evo Red 2014 has really tight clearances, can't even get raceblade longs under the caliper and cannot safely run anything more than a 23mm on the back.

    I bought a GT Grade Ultegra as I want guards and hydro disc brakes for the winter and not lost much if any time over my 15 mile commute, I think you would need to be a upper end bike rider to squeeze more out of Tarmac/SuperSix/ than they could out of a more relaxed bike.

    I Think Fabian Cancellara rides the Domane in most races out of choice although I suspect it has been modded for him with a smaller head tube.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,838
    I want a bike that is faster on the flat and hills,

    Realistically, there is no such bike, unfortunately. That kind of performance improvement is generally down to whoever happens to be riding it.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    I want a bike that is faster on the flat and hills,

    Realistically, there is no such bike, unfortunately. That kind of performance improvement is generally down to whoever happens to be riding it.

    What a load of Bollox. If that were true there would also not be a bike that was slower :roll:

    What do you mean 'that kind of performance improvement?
    There was no performance improvement quantified.

    Get a 4K Super Six Evo Hi Mod and it will be faster, just like a £100 Viking will be slower.

    Not that I would spend 4K on a bike just to be a bit faster. I would train harder if that's all you want.
  • Hi Everyone
    I've had a Giant Defy 3 for a few years and want to upgrade earlier next year. I'm finding it daunting to understand what bikes would suit my needs.

    Rose Xeon or Rose DX-Cross.

    I've just bought a DX-Cross and it will be used for road only. No cyclocross.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,838

    What a load of Bollox. If that were true there would also not be a bike that was slower :roll:

    Newsflash - bikes can be faster or slower, depending on the rider. Now get back in your box.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667

    What a load of Bollox. If that were true there would also not be a bike that was slower :roll:

    Newsflash - bikes can be faster or slower, depending on the bike and the rider. Now get back in your box.

    FTFY prior to getting in :wink:
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