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Good waterproof clothing??

MiniMaltsMiniMalts Posts: 266
edited October 2015 in Road beginners
Any recommendations? I don't want to spend shed loads of money either...

Posts

  • mfinmfin Posts: 6,724
    You'll need to expand a bit, there are all sorts of waterproof items out there, insulated or not, windproof, for head, torso, legs, feet... What are you looking for in particular?
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    Expand a lot really.
    What riding is it for? What weather conditions are you going to ride in? How waterproof do you want to be? How breathable do you want it to be? What do you mean by 'loads of money' (how much are you happy to spend, and on how many different items)?

    Unfortunately decent weather protection costs decent money generally.
    If you are serious about cycling and want good protection from the elements whilst staying comfortable on the bike, my advice would be to get a decent stuff and accept its not cheap.
  • MiniMaltsMiniMalts Posts: 266
    Looking for something to slip on when it rains. Fairly wind and waterproof would be good and something quite breathable. I have a pair of Muddyfox trousers from Sports Direct that I put on when I go for a ride and I find myself sweating in them and being wet anyway. Unless there's something good out there that keeps me dry but prevents sweating I don't see the point in spending serious money if I'm going to be wet anyway.
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 8,363
    Unless you are going to work in workaday clothes then best bet is to get wind proof rather than waterproof as unless you pay alot of money they are all going to be pretty much boil in the bag. Most sports direct/ muddyfox gear should be labelled similar to their BSO's bike shaped objects. I commute and ride in all weathers and tend to wear a decathlon windproof jacket at anything below 0 and a cheapish altura showerproof jacket when it rains above that kind of temp. Any other time i tend to just wear base layers and thermal jerseys in the cold and damp as i can have a shower at work. Work on being warm rather than dry, head,hands and feet are the most important areas to look after, overshoes for cold and wet will keep you happy. see link below.
    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/bbb-heavy-duty-oss-overshoes-bws02b-aw15/rp-prod45049
    Windproof bib tights and gloves are ideal and liner gloves when it gets very cold. Ideally a jacket with vents helps as well. Muddyfox waterproof trousers and jackets are one down from black bin liners IMHO. Finally for whats its worth i wish i had done my homework before i brought my first bike (hybrid) and cycling gear (muddyfox) would have saved me a lot of money. Aldi and Lidl along with Decathlon stuff is pretty good as a start. Also have a look at previous posts on the forum, loads of advice to pick through.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • MiniMaltsMiniMalts Posts: 266
    Unless you are going to work in workaday clothes then best bet is to get wind proof rather than waterproof as unless you pay alot of money they are all going to be pretty much boil in the bag. Most sports direct/ muddyfox gear should be labelled similar to their BSO's bike shaped objects. I commute and ride in all weathers and tend to wear a decathlon windproof jacket at anything below 0 and a cheapish altura showerproof jacket when it rains above that kind of temp. Any other time i tend to just wear base layers and thermal jerseys in the cold and damp as i can have a shower at work. Work on being warm rather than dry, head,hands and feet are the most important areas to look after, overshoes for cold and wet will keep you happy. see link below.
    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/bbb-heavy-duty-oss-overshoes-bws02b-aw15/rp-prod45049
    Windproof bib tights and gloves are ideal and liner gloves when it gets very cold. Ideally a jacket with vents helps as well. Muddyfox waterproof trousers and jackets are one down from black bin liners IMHO. Finally for whats its worth i wish i had done my homework before i brought my first bike (hybrid) and cycling gear (muddyfox) would have saved me a lot of money. Aldi and Lidl along with Decathlon stuff is pretty good as a start. Also have a look at previous posts on the forum, loads of advice to pick through.

    Thanks. :)

    I'm quite large (21 stone) and tall (6' 3") so I might struggle to find tights and things to fit. But being quite big, I don't want to go down the skin tight/Lycra route, I'd just look hideous. :(

    Thankfully, I haven't spent too much money (£20 on Muddy Fox trousers) on clothing yet so good to get your advice. :) I shall have a proper browse through the forum when I get home from visiting family.
  • wongataawongataa Posts: 892
    Unless you are going to work in workaday clothes then best bet is to get wind proof rather than waterproof as unless you pay alot of money they are all going to be pretty much boil in the bag.
    Even expensive good quality waterproofs end up giving boil in the bag results with exertion. If you are sweating a lot all breathable waterproof materials can't breathe enough. For maximum effectiveness of breathable materials the outside humidity has to be a lot lower than the humidity inside the garment, which is not likely to happen much in this country.
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    I'd forget what you think you look like and get some decent bibtights, and accept that you'll get a bit wet when it rains. Wear some baggies over the top if you like.

    For the top half if it's light rain / drizzle, concentrate on being warm and windproof. A softshell type jacket is a pretty versatile bit of kit. Or a jersey with a gilet over the top.

    If you're riding in proper rain then you need a waterproof, breathable shell. I have a Gore Path jacket which is very good on both counts, but GoreTex stuff is unfortunately not cheap. I only buy that kind of stuff if I find it at a serious discount...
  • PTestTeamPTestTeam Posts: 395
    Looking for something to slip on when it rains. Fairly wind and waterproof would be good and something quite breathable. I have a pair of Muddyfox trousers from Sports Direct that I put on when I go for a ride and I find myself sweating in them and being wet anyway. Unless there's something good out there that keeps me dry but prevents sweating I don't see the point in spending serious money if I'm going to be wet anyway.

    There are garments out there that will do it all but it will cost. If you're on a lower budget then you'll have to sacrifice waterproofness or breathability.
  • MiniMaltsMiniMalts Posts: 266
    Looking for something to slip on when it rains. Fairly wind and waterproof would be good and something quite breathable. I have a pair of Muddyfox trousers from Sports Direct that I put on when I go for a ride and I find myself sweating in them and being wet anyway. Unless there's something good out there that keeps me dry but prevents sweating I don't see the point in spending serious money if I'm going to be wet anyway.

    There are garments out there that will do it all but it will cost. If you're on a lower budget then you'll have to sacrifice waterproofness or breathability.

    Then I guess I won't mind spending the money if there is stuff out there that will work. When I first posted this, I assumed everything available would just make me sweat.

    Hit me up with some suggestions. Remember, I'm man mountain and it needs to come in bigger sizes.
  • Any recommendations? I don't want to spend shed loads of money either...

    Your skin is the best waterproof. :roll:
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    Any recommendations? I don't want to spend shed loads of money either...

    Your skin is the best waterproof. :roll:

    :roll:

    Fantastic first post, definately one for the collection.
  • MiniMaltsMiniMalts Posts: 266
    Any recommendations? I don't want to spend shed loads of money either...

    Your skin is the best waterproof. :roll:


    You've probably heard of the naked rambler, soon there may be a naked cyclist. :shock:
  • If I were you I'd be looking at Decathlon stuff, Prendas and Cycle clothing.co.uk, they all go up to big sizes.Good luck.
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    Last night I had cause to use the GoreTex jacket in anger for the first time in ages. Just a thin LS baselayer under it. Out in the intermittent rain for 90 minutes, riding fairly briskly. Bone dry when I got home. Still really impressed with it every time I wear it.

    Expensive but worth it I'd say.
  • MiniMaltsMiniMalts Posts: 266
    Last night I had cause to use the GoreTex jacket in anger for the first time in ages. Just a thin LS baselayer under it. Out in the intermittent rain for 90 minutes, riding fairly briskly. Bone dry when I got home. Still really impressed with it every time I wear it.

    Expensive but worth it I'd say.

    What were you wearing trouser/short wise?
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    Last night I had cause to use the GoreTex jacket in anger for the first time in ages. Just a thin LS baselayer under it. Out in the intermittent rain for 90 minutes, riding fairly briskly. Bone dry when I got home. Still really impressed with it every time I wear it.

    Expensive but worth it I'd say.

    What were you wearing trouser/short wise?

    Just bibshorts; it was really warm so I figured bare skin would dry out faster between showers, and I was right.

    When it's wet and cold I wear roubaix bibtights which get wet but still feel warm as long as you keep moving. Not so good if you get wet then have to stop for a mechanical...
  • KajjalKajjal Posts: 3,404
    There are good second hand deals on decent jackets on a popular auction website. Just be care to check sizing on the manufacturers web site. I got a £220 jacket for £80 recently that way. The main restriction is really your size which i also have being very tall.

    Bib tights are comfortable and keep your legs warm in the colder weather.
  • MiniMaltsMiniMalts Posts: 266
    There are good second hand deals on decent jackets on a popular auction website. Just be care to check sizing on the manufacturers web site. I got a £220 jacket for £80 recently that way. The main restriction is really your size which i also have being very tall.

    Bib tights are comfortable and keep your legs warm in the colder weather.

    Yeah I hate ordering clothing online due to the hassle of sending it back if it doesn't fit. I know my size, but my size in Burtons jeans is not the same in Nexts jeans, if you know what I mean? Plus, the trouble with eBay is, most sellers of secondhand stuff don't accept returns. :(
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