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Re-build of a Carrera TDF; thoughts and advice please?

SR7492SR7492 Posts: 190
edited February 2015 in Workshop
So I bought a Carrera as a turbo bike and does the job nicely.

I previously posted upgraded my CAAD10 group set so before I do that, I want to test my DIY skills on the Carrera first with a full re-build.

As you can imagine, the TdF is a heavy bike so my plan is to strip it to its frame and upgrade it with the following:

Complete 105 Group set
Carbon fork
RS10 Shimano rims
New saddle
New Stem
New Handlebars

Basically get it much lighter than what it is and use it as a winter bike :)

Has anyone done something similar?

My main query is with the fork; are all carbon forks standard size or do I need to look for a specific size for the Carrera?

Happy with any suggestions anyone has - thanks in advance.

Posts

  • lancewlancew Posts: 680
    From what I've gathered forks are fairly standardized, with minor differences in height. But you must ensure that it is a 1" 1/8 steerer tube and not a 1". (I am fairly sure the TDF uses a 1 1/8, might be worth checking). The stem will match this so your handlebars will match.

    I got a Planet x TT carbon fork for £45 for my fixie, and it worked a charm.

    The front mech might need replacing/an adapter, and if this is the case the saddle might be a different width.

    Factor in the cost of new cable outers and inners which might need to be replaced.

    Basically I would put aside £50-100 to get everything matching. You might only need £10 though if you're lucky.
    Specialized Allez Sport 2013
  • crikeycrikey Posts: 362
    Build it with the original fork first; saves a lot of messing about with headsets and compatibility, then see how it feels before changing the fork.
  • Best upgrade for Tdf is to sell it on eBay and start again.
  • 964cup964cup Posts: 1,359
    lancew wrote:
    From what I've gathered forks are fairly standardized, with minor differences in height. But you must ensure that it is a 1" 1/8 steerer tube and not a 1". (I am fairly sure the TDF uses a 1 1/8, might be worth checking). The stem will match this so your handlebars will match.

    It's a bit more complicated than that. First you need to match the steerer diameter. This could be 1" straight (unlikely), 1 1/8" straight (probable); 1 1/8" to 1 1/4" tapered, 1 1/8" to 1 3/8" tapered or 1 1/8" to 1 1/2" tapered (or 1" 1/4" to 1 1/2" tapered, but only if it's a Giant or a Canyon, which it ain't, but don't, therefore, buy a second-hand fork from these bikes). If you can't find the relevant spec online, get some calipers and measure it (or take it to your LBS).

    Then you'll need to match the fork rake (measured in mm). This is how far forward the front axle is from an imaginary line drawn through the steerer. If you don't, it's not a disaster (unless it needs rake to get downtube clearance) but it will change the handling. 43-45 mm seems to be the normal range for road bikes, but look it up.

    Then you'll need to make sure you have enough steerer length on your (presumably second-hand) new fork, accounting for the headtube itself, the lower headset cup, the upper headset cup and the cone spacer, and (at least) the height of the stem less 4mm; more if you run with any spacers under the stem. If you're using a carbon steerer tubed fork, the general advice is to make sure you have a couple of mm of steerer above the stem so that you can run with a 5mm spacer above the stem.

    Or just build it with the original fork.

    Or keep it on the turbo and buy yourself a decent winter bike.
  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    You're over-thinking this -it'll 99% likely be 1 1/8" - 1" forks fell out of favour about 12 years ago and tapered forks only really feature on higher models. A few mm differences in rake or length will make imperceptible differences to how the bike rides. Changing the fork to carbon will lose a big lump of weight and make one of the biggest differences to how the bike feels.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,215
    It's a lot of effort and expense for a winter bike - I'd just leave it as it is and ride it. Replace stuff when it breaks/wear out.
  • SR7492SR7492 Posts: 190
    Thanks everyone, great info and advice.

    I could have bought a more 'decent' bike but buying the Carrera was deliberate so I can actually use it as workshop bike improve my DIY skills.

    I got it cheap and already have some bits of upgrades I listed so it won't cost me a lot to do what I want.
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