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CO2 inflaters

gcwebbyukgcwebbyuk Posts: 1,926
edited July 2014 in MTB buying advice
Can anyone recommend a good CO2 tyre inflater that has a psi gauge?

I am unable to use a mini pump due to injury, but want to carry something with me just in case.

Are they much cop? Most of the ones I see don't have a gauge, so how do you work out what the pressure is, other than carrying a pressure gauge too?

Posts

  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    In an emergency accurate pressure isn't really important. Just do the thumb test.
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  • njee20njee20 Posts: 9,613
    ^^ this.

    A 16g CO2 cannister will do either an MTB or road tyre to about the right pressure, and just about ok on a 29er MTB tyre. Sort it out properly when you get home.
  • gcwebbyukgcwebbyuk Posts: 1,926
    Good points. I hadn't really thought of it that way.

    Are there any you recommend, or are they all much the same?

    I heard that tyreinflators.co.uk was the place to get refils.
  • stubsstubs Posts: 5,001
    Get one that has a sleeve or cover on the cylinder unless you like frostbite. They get bloomin cold when they are fired.
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  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    I use a Lezyne inflator. As above, make sure it has a sleeve for the cylinder.
    I only use mine for commuting, much easier than breaking out the mini pump at 6:00am in the rain.
    It takes literally seconds to inflate a tyre and I just give them a squeeze to check pressures but if I empty a canister it comes to about 110psi in my road tyre and 35psi in my 2.2"x26" mountain bike tyre.
  • drlodgedrlodge Posts: 4,825
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  • njee20njee20 Posts: 9,613
    I like the Innovations Microflate, IMO avoid anything with a trigger to attempt to regulate the release of the gas, they're rubbish. Avoid anything that is also a normal mini pump.
  • stubsstubs Posts: 5,001
    If you use Co2 on a tubeless set up that has latex sealant let the Co2 out when you get home and pump up with your normal pump. Apparently the Co2 reacts with the latex and can radically shorten the life of the sealant.
    Fig rolls: proof that god loves cyclists and that she wants us to do another lap
  • gcwebbyukgcwebbyuk Posts: 1,926
    I'm just using standard inner tubes for the time being, but I had heard of that "issue" too.
  • stubsstubs Posts: 5,001
    Not a chemist but from what I have read its all about the CO2 reacting with the Latex to form Carbonic acid (I possibly have name wrong) this then forms crystals of Bicarbonates the Latex sticks all the crystals together and you end up with spiky snotballs of Latex and Bicarbonate crystals.

    I tried reading op on the chemistry but my eyeballs glazed over after about 3 sentences and my brain started wanting to watch cat videos on youtube.
    Fig rolls: proof that god loves cyclists and that she wants us to do another lap
  • warrerjwarrerj Posts: 665
    I have 2 types and both work really well.
    A GI Mountain Pipe (CO2 and mini pump) for MTB and a GI Airchuck elite for the road. I'd recommend either and have to many club members who've been happy with their too.
  • gcwebbyukgcwebbyuk Posts: 1,926
    I was just about to hit go on a GI Airchuck Elite from Wiggle, and a pack of 6 cannisters. Spotted the £5 voucher when signing up for newsletter, so just waiting for that to come through.

    I will get the first set of cannisters from Wiggle, and then after that, get them from tyreinflators.co.uk.

    I hope I don't actually have to use it, but at least I know it will be there if I need it.

    p.s. It will be used to inflate Conti Travel Contact 1.75 semi slicks, so I guess it will be able to get a decent pressure into them (rated at 80psi) as they are narrower than typical MTB tyres.
  • njee20njee20 Posts: 9,613
    It'll be enough certainly.
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