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Bags

cyclingpropcyclingprop Posts: 2,426
edited April 2013 in Commuting chat
I'd like a waterproof bag that is large enough to handle a 9 day bike trip, that doesn't cost the Earth. Ideas?
What do you mean you think 64cm is a big frame?

Posts

  • what do you consider to be not the earth?
  • HoopdriverHoopdriver Posts: 2,023
    When you say 9-day trip are you camping or hostling/B&B-ing?
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,951
    I'd like a waterproof bag that is large enough to handle a 9 day bike trip, that doesn't cost the Earth. Ideas?

    a couple of these should do
    Candy_Strip_Blue_1.jpg

    you're welcome
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • cyclingpropcyclingprop Posts: 2,426
    Thanks Boff. Not helpful - thinking in addition to carriers.

    Under canvas but logistics are managed, so risk of wet is when baggage is transferred.
    What do you mean you think 64cm is a big frame?
  • HoopdriverHoopdriver Posts: 2,023
    Thanks Boff. Not helpful - thinking in addition to carriers.

    Under canvas but logistics are managed, so risk of wet is when baggage is transferred.
    I'm sorry, I still don't get it. By logistics managed do you mean the bulky gear is being transported so that you do not have to carry it, and can thus get away with a smaller bag on the bike?

    Ortlieb make wonderful waterproof bags but they are expensive. Carradice bags are very nice, less expensive, although being made out of heavy canvas the are not strictly waterproof. That said, I have ridden on long tors with Carradice bags in pouring rain without trouble.

    I have used both Ortlieb and Carradice and like them both.

    If you were B&B-ing or having the bulk of your gear transferred, and wanted to travel light, I would highly recommend the Carradice Super-C saddlebag (23 litres) and Bagman support rack. I have done fairly long (B&B) tours with just this and a bar bag and had all I needed. Just pack sensibly.
  • cyclingpropcyclingprop Posts: 2,426
    Hoopdriver wrote:
    Thanks Boff. Not helpful - thinking in addition to carriers.

    Under canvas but logistics are managed, so risk of wet is when baggage is transferred.
    I'm sorry, I still don't get it. By logistics managed do you mean the bulky gear is being transported so that you do not have to carry it, and can thus get away with a smaller bag on the bike?

    Ortlieb make wonderful waterproof bags but they are expensive. Carradice bags are very nice, less expensive, although being made out of heavy canvas the are not strictly waterproof. That said, I have ridden on long tors with Carradice bags in pouring rain without trouble.

    I have used both Ortlieb and Carradice and like them both.

    If you were B&B-ing or having the bulk of your gear transferred, and wanted to travel light, I would highly recommend the Carradice Super-C saddlebag (23 litres) and Bagman support rack. I have done fairly long (B&B) tours with just this and a bar bag and had all I needed. Just pack sensibly.

    Right, I mean for when they lump the back containing all of my gear out of the truck in to camp, where there isn't necessarily cover for them. Don't really care if a saddle bag is wet, and I'll be doing my damnedest to carry as litle as possible on the bike.
    What do you mean you think 64cm is a big frame?
  • HoopdriverHoopdriver Posts: 2,023
    Then go for a saddlebag and/or bar bag.

    Carradice make the best saddlebags - ones in which you can actually carry gear as opposed to just mobile phones and a spare tube. They make them in various sizes from the Barley (at 7 litres) to the Longflap camper at 24. I use the Super-C expedition one (23 litres) for longer tours and the Barley bag for regular rides (I write a photo-cyling blog and need to carry a camera)

    Carradice's bar bag, at only 5 litres, may be a bit small if you just want to use a bar bag. Ortlieb's bags are larger 7 and 9 litres I believe. And of course they are utterly waterproof.

    There are of course other makers, but these are the two I have used for many years and am familiar with. I can recommend both highly.
  • cyclingpropcyclingprop Posts: 2,426
    Hoopdriver wrote:
    Then go for a saddlebag and/or bar bag.

    Carradice make the best saddlebags - ones in which you can actually carry gear as opposed to just mobile phones and a spare tube. They make them in various sizes from the Barley (at 7 litres) to the Longflap camper at 24. I use the Super-C expedition one (23 litres) for longer tours and the Barley bag for regular rides (I write a photo-cyling blog and need to carry a camera)

    Carradice's bar bag, at only 5 litres, may be a bit small if you just want to use a bar bag. Ortlieb's bags are larger 7 and 9 litres I believe. And of course they are utterly waterproof.

    There are of course other makers, but these are the two I have used for many years and am familiar with. I can recommend both highly.

    5 litres is a bit small for 9 days of gear. #igiveup
    What do you mean you think 64cm is a big frame?
  • wgwarburtonwgwarburton Posts: 1,863
    Hoopdriver wrote:
    Thanks Boff. Not helpful - thinking in addition to carriers.

    Under canvas but logistics are managed, so risk of wet is when baggage is transferred.
    I'm sorry, I still don't get it. By logistics managed do you mean the bulky gear is being transported so that you do not have to carry it, and can thus get away with a smaller bag on the bike?

    Ortlieb make wonderful waterproof bags but they are expensive. Carradice bags are very nice, less expensive, although being made out of heavy canvas the are not strictly waterproof. That said, I have ridden on long tors with Carradice bags in pouring rain without trouble.

    I have used both Ortlieb and Carradice and like them both.

    If you were B&B-ing or having the bulk of your gear transferred, and wanted to travel light, I would highly recommend the Carradice Super-C saddlebag (23 litres) and Bagman support rack. I have done fairly long (B&B) tours with just this and a bar bag and had all I needed. Just pack sensibly.

    Right, I mean for when they lump the back containing all of my gear out of the truck in to camp, where there isn't necessarily cover for them. Don't really care if a saddle bag is wet, and I'll be doing my damnedest to carry as litle as possible on the bike.

    OK, so if I get this, the bag won't be on the bike, it'll be moved from camp to camp on a truck.

    So go for one of these:

    http://www.ewetsuits.com/acatalog/Dry-B ... .html#a597

    ...or similar. Dry, easy to handle and cheaper than cycle-luggage.

    Scroll down for Hi-Vis versions, small versions, 1st aid versions, ones with windows, one for rifles....

    Cheers,
    W.
  • HoopdriverHoopdriver Posts: 2,023
    Hoopdriver wrote:
    Then go for a saddlebag and/or bar bag.

    Carradice make the best saddlebags - ones in which you can actually carry gear as opposed to just mobile phones and a spare tube. They make them in various sizes from the Barley (at 7 litres) to the Longflap camper at 24. I use the Super-C expedition one (23 litres) for longer tours and the Barley bag for regular rides (I write a photo-cyling blog and need to carry a camera)

    Carradice's bar bag, at only 5 litres, may be a bit small if you just want to use a bar bag. Ortlieb's bags are larger 7 and 9 litres I believe. And of course they are utterly waterproof.

    There are of course other makers, but these are the two I have used for many years and am familiar with. I can recommend both highly.

    5 litres is a bit small for 9 days of gear. #igiveup
    What gives here?

    You said your stuff was being moved by truck and that you planned to carry as little as possible on the bike.

    Did you read my post?
    I suggested saddlebags ranging from 7 litres to 24 litres, plus bar bags from 5 liters to 9. That gives you a range from 5 litres to 36 litres carrying capacity, plus whatever you move by truck.

    I am the one who is giving up. You don't seem to have a clue what you want or plan to do, or at the very least you seem utterly unable to articulate it
  • cyclingpropcyclingprop Posts: 2,426
    Hoopdriver wrote:
    Hoopdriver wrote:
    Then go for a saddlebag and/or bar bag.

    Carradice make the best saddlebags - ones in which you can actually carry gear as opposed to just mobile phones and a spare tube. They make them in various sizes from the Barley (at 7 litres) to the Longflap camper at 24. I use the Super-C expedition one (23 litres) for longer tours and the Barley bag for regular rides (I write a photo-cyling blog and need to carry a camera)

    Carradice's bar bag, at only 5 litres, may be a bit small if you just want to use a bar bag. Ortlieb's bags are larger 7 and 9 litres I believe. And of course they are utterly waterproof.

    There are of course other makers, but these are the two I have used for many years and am familiar with. I can recommend both highly.

    5 litres is a bit small for 9 days of gear. #igiveup
    What gives here?

    You said your stuff was being moved by truck and that you planned to carry as little as possible on the bike.

    Did you read my post?
    I suggested saddlebags ranging from 7 litres to 24 litres, plus bar bags from 5 liters to 9. That gives you a range from 5 litres to 36 litres carrying capacity, plus whatever you move by truck.

    I am the one who is giving up. You don't seem to have a clue what you want or plan to do, or at the very least you seem utterly unable to articulate it

    It's the bag on the truck that I'm looking to buy. Assumption (as always) is the mother of all F* ups... I assumed I was being clear, and you assumed I wanted bags to go on the bike.

    (Thanks BTW, WGW - very helpful :) )
    What do you mean you think 64cm is a big frame?
  • HoopdriverHoopdriver Posts: 2,023
    North Face makes some waterproof duffle bags that I have used on assignments. THey come in all sorts of sizes, some quite large. THey are good, and durable and waterproof. Whether they match your 'don't cost the Earth' criteria, I do not know. Guess it depends on how you value the Earth.
  • Drfabulous0Drfabulous0 Posts: 1,539
    CP, that was pretty ambiguous. Just buy a roll of heavy duty bin liners, seriously the best option.
  • cyclingpropcyclingprop Posts: 2,426
    CP, that was pretty ambiguous. Just buy a roll of heavy duty bin liners, seriously the best option.
    Thanks for the contribution.
    What do you mean you think 64cm is a big frame?
  • dhopedhope Posts: 6,699
    I have an Ortleib drybag you're welcome to use.
    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/ortlieb-x-plore ... -35-litre/

    Probably enough for a mid morning snack for you. Give me a shout if you want to borrow.
    Rose Xeon CW Disc
    CAAD12 Disc
    Condor Tempo
  • Drfabulous0Drfabulous0 Posts: 1,539
    CP, that was pretty ambiguous. Just buy a roll of heavy duty bin liners, seriously the best option.
    Thanks for the contribution.

    I sense sarcasm, but I have been motorcycle touring for 40 years and found that for luggage both on or off the bike, bin liners are the best answer for keeping your stuff dry. They are more effective than most waterproof bags excluding Ortlieb and allow you to use whatever bags you have, plus they cost almost nothing. One roll did me fine for a six month trip through Asia, the Middle East and Europe, but you go ahead and scoff and waste your money on something expensive.
  • jimmypippajimmypippa Posts: 1,712
    I have a 65 litre drybag from Alpkit.

    http://www.alpkit.com/shop/cart.php?target=product&product_id=16469&category_id=251

    £17 seemed reasonable to pay for the ease of use, and the fact that I knew that Alpkit has good customer service - having used them several times now.
  • ApplespiderApplespider Posts: 506
    Alpkit are great; my sis swears by their down jackets which they'll take back and refill if you ask them nicely.

    I have Ortlieb panniers and they are brilliant in terms of keeping stuff dry but I wish they had an outer pocket so that you could have some stuff closer to hand rather than having to unroll the pannier in the wet.

    Only one thing to bear in mind if you are touring and it's not wet all the time; that the downside of uber waterproof panniers is that if anything is remotely damp when you put it in, it will still be damp when it comes out since they have no breathability.
  • I bought a couple of cheap dry sacks from ebay. Great bit of kit that works really well for keeping gear dry or for keeping wet kit away from everything else.
    Nobody told me we had a communication problem
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