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Cornering technique

chrisaonabikechrisaonabike Posts: 1,914
edited October 2012 in Road beginners
Thought I'd ask this in Beginners rather than hijacking this thread.

I read this article on cornering with interest, not least cos I'm a complete chicken downhill and round bends, and also took a look at this diagram.

What I don't get is that the 'correct' line through the corner has a much sharper turn in it than the 'wrong' line.

So I can't see why the 'correct' line doesn't have a higher skid risk. I'd appreciate it if someone that understands the physics of it could explain.
Is the gorilla tired yet?

Posts

  • Looking at the diagram, with the correct line you may have to brake marginally more before turning in but you'll already have your exit line and be accelerating before you get to the late apex.

    With the wrong line, although you may carry more speed into the corner you'll be later to accelerate out of the corner and may have to brake again after the apex due to running off line which will lose you speed and time, and braking in a straight line as in the correct line is preferable to doing so when turning.
  • That line isn't possible on open roads though is it? You can cut into the oncoming traffic to get round a corner. Just slow right down to 10/15mph and go round carefully.
  • sungodsungod Posts: 13,722
    turning in too early can limit visibility, lengthens the turn, may mean braking in stages, and leaves you still turning when you really want to be accelerating

    staying wider means you can brake just once (hard), turn tight, then accelerate immediately

    it may seem counter intuitive, but if you try both on the same (safe) corner it's surprising what a difference it makes, even on the flat

    but if there's traffic, keep it sloooooow and safe
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • HerbsmanHerbsman Posts: 2,029
    CAPTAIN BUCKFAST'S CYCLING TIPS - GUARANTEED TO WORK! 1 OUT OF 10 RACING CYCLISTS AGREE!
  • Thanks guys. Seems the wrong assumption I'd been making was that speed on entry to the corner was the same for both right and wrong lines.

    Whereas, if I'm understanding right, the right line has a slower entry, but only one braking section, and a quicker exit with more options, so safer and quicker overall.

    Makes more sense, now, cheers.
    Is the gorilla tired yet?
  • hipshothipshot Posts: 371
    Herbsman wrote:

    Nice link. Hadn't read that one.
  • GizmodoGizmodo Posts: 1,928
    baldwin471 wrote:
    That line isn't possible on open roads though is it? You can cut into the oncoming traffic to get round a corner. Just slow right down to 10/15mph and go round carefully.
    Of course it is, read the diagram. The dashed line is the white line in the middle of the road, it even says so on the diagram. :roll:
  • FlacVestFlacVest Posts: 100
    Thanks guys. Seems the wrong assumption I'd been making was that speed on entry to the corner was the same for both right and wrong lines.

    Whereas, if I'm understanding right, the right line has a slower entry, but only one braking section, and a quicker exit with more options, so safer and quicker overall.

    Makes more sense, now, cheers.

    But this only applies if you can't maintain that speed throughout the entire corner.

    If you have a fast entry and don't have to break, you'll have a faster exit speed. It's about control of the bike as well.

    Each corner warrants a different technique; you have to ride it multiple times, but you'll get an idea of how far you can lean into it; the harder you can lean (faster/more intertia), the less you'll have to break, given the corner runs wide.
  • To be honest that diagram isnt the best illustration ive seen and a bit missleading.

    Generally, you want to be as far left or right of your part of the road as you can approaching the bend. This gives you the best sight through the corner.
    All braking is done before the corner to scrub the speed off, you then power through the corner and up to speed.

    One of the hardest things is knowing how sharp any given corner is. A tip when reading a corner, especially one you havent seen before, is to follow this simple visual clue. Look ahead at the road going into the corner, and where the two edges of the road meet to make a point watch what it does. If its constantly moving towards you, it means the corner (where you cant see it round the bend) is actually getting tighter.
    If the point is moving away from you it means the corner is opening up so you can afford to put the power down.
    If the point stays the same it means the corner stays at the current arc you are on now.

    This method of reading a corner works anywhere and everytime. Its a great way of taking corners you have never ridden before.
  • dashikdashik Posts: 156
    Its called the 'Vanishing point' and indeed it is reliable, however from a driving instruction point of view it does not work on blind summits (hump back bridges etc). So if your going fast enough on a push bike that you cant see the vanishing point then you need to slow down.
  • oviovi Posts: 396
    screenshot2012102817522.png

    Look at how scott redding is getting as much of his body as close to the ground as possible, the basic technique applys on a push bike but as their is no engine braking like a motorbike just keep hold of the back brake just incase you need to feather it on if you start running wide.
    This is more important to do when in the wet though!

    Powering out of a bend is difficult when leaning over around a bend on a pushbike as your pedals will touch the ground.

    You tube: fabian cancellara and watch his style
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