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Bikeability instructor - expected wage?

king_jeffersking_jeffers Posts: 694
edited September 2012 in The cake stop
Being made redundant and totally flapping, looking for alternative career options and spotted Bikeability. Anyone know what the average wage is, typical hours required per week. I’ve been self employed before so that aspect is fine just wondered if it was worth the investment.

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  • I've also been wondering about this, it seems with the current surge in number of cyclist this may be a nice way to earn a living...
  • ProssPross Posts: 26,112
    An old article but http://roadcyclinguk.com/news/rides-news/bikeability-bursary-scheme.html

    I suspect there will be more opportunities in some areas than others but doesn't seem a very good option for a full time career (depends what you are looking for I guess). Might be better off going down the coaching route instead?
  • dw300dw300 Posts: 1,642
    Another redundancy victim here .. what sort of investment in terms of time and money do you need to become a coach?
    All the above is just advice .. you can do whatever the f*ck you wana do!
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  • rozzer32rozzer32 Posts: 3,439
    dw300 wrote:
    Another redundancy victim here .. what sort of investment in terms of time and money do you need to become a coach?

    http://www.britishcycling.org.uk/coaching/article/coast_awards_overview_page
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  • censored money and you would be lucky to get enough hours in to make it worth while.
  • - between £50 and £70 pd depending upon location
    - Typically 08:45 ish to 15:15 ish
    - Seasonal (eg summer hols, / Jan/Feb bad weather)
    - Don’t expect work every day of the week.
    - Can register with an ITO or go freelance
    - Expect to pay for a training course (circa£350)
    - You’ll need a CRB check
    - Prob a first aid cct too
    - Can offset costs such as courses on your tax return

    In short it’s a tough way to earn a decent wage on its own but the hours mean you have time to supplement it with other things. Come to think of it, CYCLESPORT1's not far off the mark.
    I may be a minority of one but that doesn't prevent me from being right.
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  • ProssPross Posts: 26,112
    dw300 wrote:
    Another redundancy victim here .. what sort of investment in terms of time and money do you need to become a coach?

    To earn money out of coaching (i.e. in producing individual training plans) on the BC coaching route you would need to be Level 3 in the discipline you want to coach. To get there you would have to do Level 2 generic and Level 2 discipline based for which you could probably get grant funding but for Level 3 you probably won't be that lucky and it costs about £750. There is also the ABCC route which would be quicker and cheaper I think. Once qualified though I suspect it is harder to get clients if you are not well known in your area as a successful cyclist (not that this necessarily means you'll be a better coach but with no coaching CV to offer people are likely to want to know what you have done yourself).

    I suppose you could do a Level 2 generic course and then start running after school clubs or similar and make a small amount of money and together with Bikeability work you might just about make a living.
  • I didn't know you could make any money out of teaching kids to cycle until last week. I am a volunteer coach at a Go-Ride club - level 2 and we charge parents £1.50 for a hour. I found out last week there was a guy in our town charging £30 to teach kids to be able to go their bikes without stabilisers. It was £30 for the first hour and then £15 an hour if the sprog hadn't got the hang of it by the end of the first hour.

    Apparently he was doing great business during the summer hols here as competitive parents didn't want their kids to be the last ones off stabilisers.

    I wish I had thought of it :P
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