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Tubular rims

ratherbeintobagoratherbeintobago Posts: 636
edited April 2011 in MTB buying advice
Out of idle curiosity, are there any 26" MTB tubular rims available apart from the Ambrosio Tubular Disc?

Andy

Posts

  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 50,675 Lives Here
    I think Easton did some carbon ones.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • They seem to have stopped now; as far as I can see the only rim they do as a standalone is a road clincher.

    Andy
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 50,675 Lives Here
    a quick google brings up

    Ritchey Superlogic Carbon 30mm Tubular - MTB Wheels

    and others try it.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • a quick google brings up

    Ritchey Superlogic Carbon 30mm Tubular - MTB Wheels

    and others try it.

    It does*, but that isn't massively helpful and is frankly a bit patronising. I am aware there are complete wheels available; the question was about tubular rims.

    Andy

    *and indeed I'd tried it before posting.
  • njee20njee20 Posts: 9,613
    Not really alu ones, iirc FRM did some too at one point. Carbon there's AX Lightness, Enve and Innolite off the top of my head.

    There's a long thread on Weight Weenies about them.
  • There's a long thread on Weight Weenies about them.

    Thanks - I'll have a look there.

    Andy
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    What's the advantage of tubular rims?
  • getonyourbikegetonyourbike Posts: 2,648
    What's the advantage of tubular rims?
    +1
  • What's the advantage of tubular rims?

    Outside racing, niche value? :-P
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    seriously though. Why are you after tubulars? Do they not require tubular tyres too? (which are also apparently very thin on the ground)
  • getonyourbikegetonyourbike Posts: 2,648
    lots of bad things about tubulars:
    hard to change the tyre and tube inside the tyre.
    lots of money
    thin on the ground
    they might not be as stable when it comes to cornering with the low pressures in mtbing
  • ratherbeintobagoratherbeintobago Posts: 636
    edited April 2011
    they might not be as stable when it comes to cornering with the low pressures in mtbing

    I thought one of the advantages was that the tyre was more likely to stay on the rim at low pressures, especially compared with tubeless?

    As to why - mainly idle curiosity, as said in the OP; having said that, my usual loop is fast bridleway with lots of bailout options which means terminal tyre damage wouldn't be the end of the world. And they are niche.

    Weight Weenies thread here

    Andy
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    So you're after them just because they're niche?
  • So you're after them just because they're niche?

    I'm not sure I am after them. If I thought they were much faster/lighter than running tubeless tyres I might be interested as my local loop would negate the getting-home-if-there's-tyre-failure problem; the problem is that the rim options are all relatively heavy (Ambrosio) or frantically expensive.

    Andy
  • njee20njee20 Posts: 9,613
    I'd be interested to try some, but I just don't really see the advantages!
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