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Need some OT advice please

suzybsuzyb Posts: 3,449
edited May 2010 in Commuting chat
My ex-boss emailed me asking if I'd be interested in some freelance work. I am however he wants to know how up to date and "strong" my c#/sql server knowledge is.

Problem is I don't do a lot of .net now. I can still hold my own but it may not be the "strongest" stored procedures or the most up to date code but how do I say that.

So far I have
To be honest I work mostly in PHP now so although I know the theory of the differences with the new versions of C#/SQL Server I haven’t actually coded specifically to them.
But how do I finish it :(

Posts

  • MonkeyMonsterMonkeyMonster Posts: 4,628
    suzyb wrote:
    My code will work just might not be the prettiest out there.
    Le Cannon [98 Cannondale M400] [FCN: 8]
    The Mad Monkey [2013 Hoy 003] [FCN: 4]
  • tailwindhometailwindhome Posts: 16,085
    suzyb wrote:
    My ex-boss emailed me asking if I'd be interested in some freelance work. I am however he wants to know how up to date and "strong" my c#/sql server knowledge is.

    Problem is I don't do a lot of .net now. I can still hold my own but it may not be the "strongest" stored procedures or the most up to date code but how do I say that.

    So far I have
    To be honest I work mostly in PHP now so although I know the theory of the differences with the new versions of C#/SQL Server I haven’t actually coded specifically to them.
    But how do I finish it :(

    I have no idea what any of that means, but I think I get the gist.

    Lets try a role play

    EXBOSS - "I'd like to offer you a job, can you do XYZ"

    SUZYB - "Yes, I can do XYZ"


    Any questions?
    Believe that a farther shore
    Is reachable from here.
    Believe in miracles
    And cures and healing wells
  • If you used to be very good, the chances are you'll be as good as the average person to start, and back to your old level very soon. Starting any new job you have a learning curve, no matter what you've done before, they don't need to know that your learning curve is any steeper than anyone else's - by the time you're expected to be fully back in the swing of things, you'll be more than capable.

    Go with TWH's answer.
  • suzybsuzyb Posts: 3,449
    It's not a full time job, it's just some freelance work which typically don't come with extra time to learn on the job. And I don't want to get caught in a lie when I can't deliver the work to their standard.
  • Jay dubbleUJay dubbleU Posts: 3,197
    Probably a confidence thing Suzy - once you get back into the swing you'll be fine - its like riding a bike - once learnt never forgotten :wink:
  • davisdavis Posts: 2,566
    Feh. Be honest. Far, far, far easier to defend your position/code/self if you've told the blunt honest truth, plus, if you do get the job, you'll be happier doing the work because they'll have an accurate idea of your abilities. Lying about them or dressing them up will be spotted very quickly on the job if there's anybody else with clue about -- at least in this specific arena (the only one I know about). That's why I disagree with TailWindHome.

    You don't have to sell yourself too much; you've been contacted by someone who knows you offering you a job.

    Something like:

    I work mostly in PHP [you should specify a DB here too, IMHO] now, but I've worked with .net & SQL Server previously [timescales; how long ago and for what duration]. While I haven't yet had much proven commercial experience with C# I have written [insert something you've done here; if you haven't yet done anything with C# then get yourself the devkit (or however MS do it) and do something; don't lie] and I feel my programming skills from other employments transferred well.

    That's probably what I'd write, and if I didn't get the job I'd assume I would have been put into a difficult position by lying about some skills I didn't have.
    Sometimes parts break. Sometimes you crash. Sometimes it’s your fault.
  • always_tyredalways_tyred Posts: 4,965
    Purple. Yes, pretty sure its purple.
  • suzybsuzyb Posts: 3,449
    Purple. Yes, pretty sure its purple.
    huh?
  • ceecee Posts: 4,553
    suzy...

    I work with various languages including C#.

    I never ever tried to learn all of the ins and outs of the .net framework or indeed any language. because they are just to big and varied.

    I work on the principle that as long as I logically know what I want to do, then the internets can fill in any detail about the particular language/framework.

    What I do have firmly in my head...are the things which I do most often...and things which have been particularly troublesome in the past.

    MSDN is your friend.

    As for SQL Server....sprocs are the same in SQL Server 2008 as they were in SQL Server 2000. In fact....T-SQL has not had that many changes...

    again...the internets are your friend.
    Whenever I see an adult on a bicycle, I believe in the future of the human race.

    H.G. Wells.
  • always_tyredalways_tyred Posts: 4,965
    suzyb wrote:
    Purple. Yes, pretty sure its purple.
    huh?
    My thoughts exactly.
  • wgwarburtonwgwarburton Posts: 1,863
    cee wrote:
    ...I work on the principle that as long as I logically know what I want to do, then the internets can fill in any detail about the particular language/framework.
    ....

    +1: I don't know the details of your technology, but as a long-term freelancer I'd say the two qualities you need are:

    1) Competence
    2) Professionalism

    So, in your situation I would let them know that you may not be bang up to date on their specific requirements but that you wouldn't anticipate any problems coming up to speed quickly.
    Assuming that you can say that honestly, the ball's in their court. Given that they've worked with you before they should know what to expect.

    In my experience you get a lot of credit for an honest statement of your skills (especially in Scotland- it's a small market and bullshitters don't last long). If they take you on knowing that you need to do a little honing of your skills then everyone knows the score, and they'd probably rather know where they stand than take a punt on someone unknown.

    Just my opinion, worth what you paid for it etc... :-)

    Cheers,
    W.
  • soy_saucesoy_sauce Posts: 987
    be honest but also be positive and let him know that you are up for the job.

    as long as Google still exist, you will be fine.
    "It is not impossible, its just improbable"

    Specialized Rockhopper Pro Disc 08
  • suzybsuzyb Posts: 3,449
    Thanks for the advice folks.

    Went for the honest but can't see any problems learning approach. And I just got an email asking whether I'd be willing to work on site :)

    Oh and the first thing I do. Check to see how far of a bike ride it would be.
  • mudcoveredmudcovered Posts: 725

    +1: I don't know the details of your technology, but as a long-term freelancer I'd say the two qualities you need are:

    1) Competence
    2) Professionalism
    Honesty is always best. That's the policy I try to stick to in my job (Software engineer for a firm that subcontracts to others) and its certainly what I expect from others. Sometimes it is obviously not the case and nobody spots it until it is too late. :x

    Mike
  • Wallace1492Wallace1492 Posts: 3,707
    suzyb wrote:
    Thanks for the advice folks.

    Went for the honest but can't see any problems learning approach. And I just got an email asking whether I'd be willing to work on site :)

    Oh and the first thing I do. Check to see how far of a bike ride it would be.

    How far then? They got facilities?
    "Encyclopaedia is a fetish for very small bicycles"
  • suzybsuzyb Posts: 3,449
    suzyb wrote:
    Thanks for the advice folks.

    Went for the honest but can't see any problems learning approach. And I just got an email asking whether I'd be willing to work on site :)

    Oh and the first thing I do. Check to see how far of a bike ride it would be.

    How far then? They got facilities?
    According to bike hike it's around 20 miles so would be a bit too far for me to commute.
  • Wallace1492Wallace1492 Posts: 3,707
    That's not too far...... maybe for everyday, but 2 or 3 days a week that would be fine. Think of how you woulkd zoom up the SCR stats table....
    "Encyclopaedia is a fetish for very small bicycles"
  • suzybsuzyb Posts: 3,449
    it's not the distance, it's the time it would take me. Not sure I fancy getting up at 6:30 just so I have time to cycle to work. I need my sleep :(

    Mind you I should probably wait and see if I get the job first before I start thinking of ways to get there :wink:
  • Crikey, this ones a bit nerd-tastic aint it?
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