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More cyclists = safer roads.

number9number9 Posts: 440
edited May 2009 in Campaign
Today's Guardian:



It's been shown already by Jacobsen 2003 - the number of accidents is inverse to the number of cyclists on the road. Hence partly why there are so few accidents in the Netherlands - and partly why there are so many more in London - drivers aren't looking for cyclists as relatively so few of them.


More cyclists= safer roads.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/ ... calderdale

Posts

  • bompingtonbompington Posts: 7,674
    No wonder I'm always getting knocked off, I'm the only target they've got round here
  • bompingtonbompington Posts: 7,674
    More seriously, there are a lot of valid points in the Guardian article. Now I do in fact wear lycra, for the performance not the image I might add, and I wouldn't cycle a yard without my helmet (third in three years, one retired with a big hole, the other split in two).
    But I wholeheartedly agree that normalisation of cycling is a good thing in every way, and for most people that means not looking weird.
    On a tangent from this, here's a question I was reminded of this morning - when cars start to encroach on the bike lane, & I'm not in a position either to get ahead or drop behind, I give them a polite "hello I'm here" tap on the window. Most drivers react either in great shock and surprise, or anger, which makes me wonder how effective this tactic is, but what else do you do?
  • keep tapping - stay safe.

    I think part of it is a kind of break even point too. I've noticed that on stretches with multiple cyclists cars adopt a diffeent mentality. One bike is a single obstacle, many are traffic
  • toontratoontra Posts: 1,160
    bompington wrote:
    On a tangent from this, here's a question I was reminded of this morning - when cars start to encroach on the bike lane, & I'm not in a position either to get ahead or drop behind, I give them a polite "hello I'm here" tap on the window. Most drivers react either in great shock and surprise, or anger, which makes me wonder how effective this tactic is, but what else do you do?

    As I undertake I point to the cycle lane and give them a long, lingering stare. I used to bang on their near-side wing but have decided this may put me on the wrong side of the law.

    If it's a prolonged and bad case then I get verbal, as I would with mobile phone drivers or those not indicating and cutting me up.


    a serious case of small cogs
  • CyclopeCyclope Posts: 1
    In the place where I live more people commute daily by bicycles rather than by cars.
    Still the cyclists are at the mercy of the motorists. I think it would be a good idea to
    ask for an hour per day (say 8-9am) where cars are not allowed anywhere near
    the center of cities (at least cities where many people use bikes!). Of course buses
    would still be allowed.

    I think more people would bicycle to work this way and everybody would have the
    alternative of public transportation. Besides for those insisting on cars they could commute
    earlier or later. Such a measure would benefit far more people
    than it would harm. What do you think?
  • Jeremy ParkerJeremy Parker Posts: 230
    number9 wrote:
    Today's Guardian:



    It's been shown already by Jacobsen 2003 - the number of accidents is inverse to the number of cyclists on the road. Hence partly why there are so few accidents in the Netherlands - and partly why there are so many more in London - drivers aren't looking for cyclists as relatively so few of them.


    More cyclists= safer roads.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/ ... calderdale

    So, obviously, let somebody else be a pioneer

    Jeremy Parker
  • SicknoteSicknote Posts: 901
    I think it is also how some drivers see cyclists over here, as a pest and are happy to treat you like one.
    From what I have seen in places like France, it is very different.
  • ademortademort Posts: 1,924
    Interesting article in the Guardian,however the bit about automatic presumtion of innocence of a cyclist when involved in a collision with a car is debatable. Most accidents involving cyclists and motor vehicles are caused at junctions and crossing points. Crossing points are areas marked for cyclists to cross a road but have no traffic light. Most of the time road users have right of way at these points and cyclists must cross when they think that it is safe to do so.
    Also commuting, the article gives the impression that almost everybody cycles to work, school etc. My god, if only that were true.I work at a company 10 miles from my house which employs 450 people i am the only person who cycles to work all the year round. I have one colleague who cycles maybe 3 days out of five and there are three or four more who cycle occasionaly.The survey is not accurate. You only have to look at any major Dutch town or city in the morning or evening rush hour and ask yourself where are all these vehicles coming from or going to.Ok you will see a lot of commuters on bikes but a lot more in cars.
    Ademort
    ademort
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