NHS problems etc

12357

Comments

  • I don't see anything else about vacancies above?

    Vacancies are one of the problems. What are the underlying causes? Personally, I don't like the idea of just pouring more water in, until we do something to fix the leak.
    I think it's mainly money tbh.

    You can earn similar with more social hours at the supermarket check in.
    Similar to who? Nurses?

    That's nonsense.
    Literally what the surgeon was saying to me yesterday.
    just because somebody is very good at cutting people up does not make them competent at comparing salaries between different sectors.

    I am amazed at you not questioning his wisdom by spending 20 seconds on Google.

    To save you the trouble, if we assume your check out staff works a 40 hour week then they are earning £21k a year. For qualified nurses the starting salary is £27k and the RCN puts the average at £33k. If we take that up to £40k to allow for the generous pension then your surgeon would only be correct if your checkout person was working a 80 week.
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 71,586
    edited January 2023

    I don't see anything else about vacancies above?

    Vacancies are one of the problems. What are the underlying causes? Personally, I don't like the idea of just pouring more water in, until we do something to fix the leak.
    I think it's mainly money tbh.

    You can earn similar with more social hours at the supermarket check in.
    Similar to who? Nurses?

    That's nonsense.
    Literally what the surgeon was saying to me yesterday.
    just because somebody is very good at cutting people up does not make them competent at comparing salaries between different sectors.

    I am amazed at you not questioning his wisdom by spending 20 seconds on Google.

    To save you the trouble, if we assume your check out staff works a 40 hour week then they are earning £21k a year. For qualified nurses the starting salary is £27k and the RCN puts the average at £33k. If we take that up to £40k to allow for the generous pension then your surgeon would only be correct if your checkout person was working a 80 week.
    "All the nurses in my ward quit and I now see a lot of them at the check in at the supermarket"

    Who am I to judge.

    Will not take heat for sharing what other people tell me.
  • First.Aspect
    First.Aspect Posts: 14,290

    Isn't 2000 an awfully large school? As in, the size if a Russel Group university.

    Am going to venture that private school is at least 1000% over represented.

    My sixth form had 2,500 pupils.
    Think mine was about 200 in the school and 700 in the college. 2.5k is huge.

    Besides, a private school isn't going to be on thst scale per year is it?
  • photonic69
    photonic69 Posts: 2,347
    My son's comprehensive school 6th form has 400 students. 4 of them went to Oxbridge. My son is fortunate to be one of them. Another 3 went to other Russell Group unis. His mate that dearly wanted to study medicine didn't get offered a place at any uni he applied for even though he got the grades. He's deferred for a year and hopefully has a place at Southampton.


    Sometimes. Maybe. Possibly.

  • TheBigBean
    TheBigBean Posts: 20,280

    Isn't 2000 an awfully large school? As in, the size if a Russel Group university.

    Am going to venture that private school is at least 1000% over represented.

    My sixth form had 2,500 pupils.
    Think mine was about 200 in the school and 700 in the college. 2.5k is huge.

    Besides, a private school isn't going to be on thst scale per year is it?
    For clarity, there are nowhere near that number in his school. I'd guess 150 per year, so 20 getting into Oxbridge is considerable over representation. However, it is one of those prestigious academic ones that only accepts the most able, so all else equal it should be overrepresented. My point was that numbers are declining, so times are changing. Many of the parents at that school think it is a bit unfair. Plenty of people will laugh at that.






  • First.Aspect
    First.Aspect Posts: 14,290

    Isn't 2000 an awfully large school? As in, the size if a Russel Group university.

    Am going to venture that private school is at least 1000% over represented.

    My sixth form had 2,500 pupils.
    Think mine was about 200 in the school and 700 in the college. 2.5k is huge.

    Besides, a private school isn't going to be on thst scale per year is it?
    For clarity, there are nowhere near that number in his school. I'd guess 150 per year, so 20 getting into Oxbridge is considerable over representation. However, it is one of those prestigious academic ones that only accepts the most able, so all else equal it should be overrepresented. My point was that numbers are declining, so times are changing. Many of the parents at that school think it is a bit unfair. Plenty of people will laugh at that.






    Can you find me a private school that doesn't claim super excellence and justify this sort of thing? They are hardly objective - you only need to look at the grade inflation during covid, compared to the state sector, to see that.

    I'm 50 this year and Oxbridge have been getting 'fairer' for at least the last 30 years. Nice of them to be moving so fast, eh?
  • webboo
    webboo Posts: 6,087

    I don't see anything else about vacancies above?

    Vacancies are one of the problems. What are the underlying causes? Personally, I don't like the idea of just pouring more water in, until we do something to fix the leak.
    I think it's mainly money tbh.

    You can earn similar with more social hours at the supermarket check in.
    Similar to who? Nurses?

    That's nonsense.
    Literally what the surgeon was saying to me yesterday.
    just because somebody is very good at cutting people up does not make them competent at comparing salaries between different sectors.

    I am amazed at you not questioning his wisdom by spending 20 seconds on Google.

    To save you the trouble, if we assume your check out staff works a 40 hour week then they are earning £21k a year. For qualified nurses the starting salary is £27k and the RCN puts the average at £33k. If we take that up to £40k to allow for the generous pension then your surgeon would only be correct if your checkout person was working a 80 week.
    "All the nurses in my ward quit and I now see a lot of them at the check in at the supermarket"

    Who am I to judge.

    Will not take heat for sharing what other people tell me.
    They are probably working at the supermarket as it’s less stress rather than it’s better pay. Also was said consultant grouping all nurses together qualified and unqualified.
  • TheBigBean
    TheBigBean Posts: 20,280

    Isn't 2000 an awfully large school? As in, the size if a Russel Group university.

    Am going to venture that private school is at least 1000% over represented.

    My sixth form had 2,500 pupils.
    Think mine was about 200 in the school and 700 in the college. 2.5k is huge.

    Besides, a private school isn't going to be on thst scale per year is it?
    For clarity, there are nowhere near that number in his school. I'd guess 150 per year, so 20 getting into Oxbridge is considerable over representation. However, it is one of those prestigious academic ones that only accepts the most able, so all else equal it should be overrepresented. My point was that numbers are declining, so times are changing. Many of the parents at that school think it is a bit unfair. Plenty of people will laugh at that.






    Can you find me a private school that doesn't claim super excellence and justify this sort of thing? They are hardly objective - you only need to look at the grade inflation during covid, compared to the state sector, to see that.

    I'm 50 this year and Oxbridge have been getting 'fairer' for at least the last 30 years. Nice of them to be moving so fast, eh?
    Really not my interest area, but there are non-academic private schools in London and then there are the academic ones that want to be top of tables like this. Some of them are very hard to get into. You need more than money.

    https://www.schoolguide.co.uk/league_tables/independent
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 39,830

    I don't see anything else about vacancies above?

    Vacancies are one of the problems. What are the underlying causes? Personally, I don't like the idea of just pouring more water in, until we do something to fix the leak.
    I think it's mainly money tbh.

    You can earn similar with more social hours at the supermarket check in.
    Similar to who? Nurses?

    That's nonsense.
    Literally what the surgeon was saying to me yesterday.
    just because somebody is very good at cutting people up does not make them competent at comparing salaries between different sectors.

    I am amazed at you not questioning his wisdom by spending 20 seconds on Google.

    To save you the trouble, if we assume your check out staff works a 40 hour week then they are earning £21k a year. For qualified nurses the starting salary is £27k and the RCN puts the average at £33k. If we take that up to £40k to allow for the generous pension then your surgeon would only be correct if your checkout person was working a 80 week.
    "All the nurses in my ward quit and I now see a lot of them at the check in at the supermarket"

    Who am I to judge.

    Will not take heat for sharing what other people tell me.
    You would think that even if they have had enough of nursing they could find jobs other than working at a supermarket checkout with a degree to their name. Sounds like he was talking shit to me.
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 17,324
    Pross said:

    I don't see anything else about vacancies above?

    Vacancies are one of the problems. What are the underlying causes? Personally, I don't like the idea of just pouring more water in, until we do something to fix the leak.
    I think it's mainly money tbh.

    You can earn similar with more social hours at the supermarket check in.
    Similar to who? Nurses?

    That's nonsense.
    Literally what the surgeon was saying to me yesterday.
    just because somebody is very good at cutting people up does not make them competent at comparing salaries between different sectors.

    I am amazed at you not questioning his wisdom by spending 20 seconds on Google.

    To save you the trouble, if we assume your check out staff works a 40 hour week then they are earning £21k a year. For qualified nurses the starting salary is £27k and the RCN puts the average at £33k. If we take that up to £40k to allow for the generous pension then your surgeon would only be correct if your checkout person was working a 80 week.
    "All the nurses in my ward quit and I now see a lot of them at the check in at the supermarket"

    Who am I to judge.

    Will not take heat for sharing what other people tell me.
    You would think that even if they have had enough of nursing they could find jobs other than working at a supermarket checkout with a degree to their name. Sounds like he was talking censored to me.

    I think that working on supermarket checkouts is quite therapeutic if you've had enough of workshit and mortal responsibility, especially if you still like meeting people and exchanging pleasantries.
  • In this age of mega food shopping inflation, working at a supermarket in any capacity can be very lucrative, with discounts of upto ~25%. :o
    ================
    2020 Voodoo Marasa
    2017 Cube Attain GTC Pro Disc 2016
    2016 Voodoo Wazoo
  • Pross said:

    I don't see anything else about vacancies above?

    Vacancies are one of the problems. What are the underlying causes? Personally, I don't like the idea of just pouring more water in, until we do something to fix the leak.
    I think it's mainly money tbh.

    You can earn similar with more social hours at the supermarket check in.
    Similar to who? Nurses?

    That's nonsense.
    Literally what the surgeon was saying to me yesterday.
    just because somebody is very good at cutting people up does not make them competent at comparing salaries between different sectors.

    I am amazed at you not questioning his wisdom by spending 20 seconds on Google.

    To save you the trouble, if we assume your check out staff works a 40 hour week then they are earning £21k a year. For qualified nurses the starting salary is £27k and the RCN puts the average at £33k. If we take that up to £40k to allow for the generous pension then your surgeon would only be correct if your checkout person was working a 80 week.
    "All the nurses in my ward quit and I now see a lot of them at the check in at the supermarket"

    Who am I to judge.

    Will not take heat for sharing what other people tell me.
    You would think that even if they have had enough of nursing they could find jobs other than working at a supermarket checkout with a degree to their name. Sounds like he was talking censored to me.

    I think that working on supermarket checkouts is quite therapeutic if you've had enough of workshit and mortal responsibility, especially if you still like meeting people and exchanging pleasantries.
    But who would want to meet the type of person who like meeting people in supermarkets?
  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 25,228
    Pross said:

    I don't see anything else about vacancies above?

    Vacancies are one of the problems. What are the underlying causes? Personally, I don't like the idea of just pouring more water in, until we do something to fix the leak.
    I think it's mainly money tbh.

    You can earn similar with more social hours at the supermarket check in.
    Similar to who? Nurses?

    That's nonsense.
    Literally what the surgeon was saying to me yesterday.
    just because somebody is very good at cutting people up does not make them competent at comparing salaries between different sectors.

    I am amazed at you not questioning his wisdom by spending 20 seconds on Google.

    To save you the trouble, if we assume your check out staff works a 40 hour week then they are earning £21k a year. For qualified nurses the starting salary is £27k and the RCN puts the average at £33k. If we take that up to £40k to allow for the generous pension then your surgeon would only be correct if your checkout person was working a 80 week.
    "All the nurses in my ward quit and I now see a lot of them at the check in at the supermarket"

    Who am I to judge.

    Will not take heat for sharing what other people tell me.
    You would think that even if they have had enough of nursing they could find jobs other than working at a supermarket checkout with a degree to their name. Sounds like he was talking censored to me.
    My wife is a community nurse and has seriously considered jacking it in to work the till at Aldi for a less stressful/emotional work life balance. Less money, better life.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 17,324

    Pross said:

    I don't see anything else about vacancies above?

    Vacancies are one of the problems. What are the underlying causes? Personally, I don't like the idea of just pouring more water in, until we do something to fix the leak.
    I think it's mainly money tbh.

    You can earn similar with more social hours at the supermarket check in.
    Similar to who? Nurses?

    That's nonsense.
    Literally what the surgeon was saying to me yesterday.
    just because somebody is very good at cutting people up does not make them competent at comparing salaries between different sectors.

    I am amazed at you not questioning his wisdom by spending 20 seconds on Google.

    To save you the trouble, if we assume your check out staff works a 40 hour week then they are earning £21k a year. For qualified nurses the starting salary is £27k and the RCN puts the average at £33k. If we take that up to £40k to allow for the generous pension then your surgeon would only be correct if your checkout person was working a 80 week.
    "All the nurses in my ward quit and I now see a lot of them at the check in at the supermarket"

    Who am I to judge.

    Will not take heat for sharing what other people tell me.
    You would think that even if they have had enough of nursing they could find jobs other than working at a supermarket checkout with a degree to their name. Sounds like he was talking censored to me.

    I think that working on supermarket checkouts is quite therapeutic if you've had enough of workshit and mortal responsibility, especially if you still like meeting people and exchanging pleasantries.
    But who would want to meet the type of person who like meeting people in supermarkets?

    Search me, I hate supermarkets, but my dislike might not be shared by the entire population... I gather that they are quite popular.
  • I don't see anything else about vacancies above?

    Vacancies are one of the problems. What are the underlying causes? Personally, I don't like the idea of just pouring more water in, until we do something to fix the leak.
    I think it's mainly money tbh.

    You can earn similar with more social hours at the supermarket check in.
    Similar to who? Nurses?

    That's nonsense.
    Literally what the surgeon was saying to me yesterday.
    just because somebody is very good at cutting people up does not make them competent at comparing salaries between different sectors.

    I am amazed at you not questioning his wisdom by spending 20 seconds on Google.

    To save you the trouble, if we assume your check out staff works a 40 hour week then they are earning £21k a year. For qualified nurses the starting salary is £27k and the RCN puts the average at £33k. If we take that up to £40k to allow for the generous pension then your surgeon would only be correct if your checkout person was working a 80 week.
    "All the nurses in my ward quit and I now see a lot of them at the check in at the supermarket"

    Who am I to judge.

    Will not take heat for sharing what other people tell me.
    you deserve heat for not being more questioning about your sources of information, but please try and see itas constructive.

    If we analyse your quote you should ask yourself.
    what are the chances "all" nurses on his ward quit?
    what are the chances that a lot of them all chose to work at the supermarket where he shops?
    what are the chances they all do a shift at the time he goes in there?
  • webboo
    webboo Posts: 6,087
    When I retired from nursing I did go back and work part time for about 9 months before sacking it off and working as a conservation assistant for the National Trust.
    Just a touch less stressful but then they don’t pay much.
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 71,586

    I don't see anything else about vacancies above?

    Vacancies are one of the problems. What are the underlying causes? Personally, I don't like the idea of just pouring more water in, until we do something to fix the leak.
    I think it's mainly money tbh.

    You can earn similar with more social hours at the supermarket check in.
    Similar to who? Nurses?

    That's nonsense.
    Literally what the surgeon was saying to me yesterday.
    just because somebody is very good at cutting people up does not make them competent at comparing salaries between different sectors.

    I am amazed at you not questioning his wisdom by spending 20 seconds on Google.

    To save you the trouble, if we assume your check out staff works a 40 hour week then they are earning £21k a year. For qualified nurses the starting salary is £27k and the RCN puts the average at £33k. If we take that up to £40k to allow for the generous pension then your surgeon would only be correct if your checkout person was working a 80 week.
    "All the nurses in my ward quit and I now see a lot of them at the check in at the supermarket"

    Who am I to judge.

    Will not take heat for sharing what other people tell me.
    you deserve heat for not being more questioning about your sources of information, but please try and see itas constructive.

    If we analyse your quote you should ask yourself.
    what are the chances "all" nurses on his ward quit?
    what are the chances that a lot of them all chose to work at the supermarket where he shops?
    what are the chances they all do a shift at the time he goes in there?
    What can I say, small talk while he has his finger up my bum is not as insightful as you'd have hoped.
  • First.Aspect
    First.Aspect Posts: 14,290
    .
    webboo said:

    When I retired from nursing I did go back and work part time for about 9 months before sacking it off and working as a conservation assistant for the National Trust.
    Just a touch less stressful but then they don’t pay much.

    Where did you get to work, for the national trust. I'm guess the "office" was quite nice?
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 39,830

    Pross said:

    I don't see anything else about vacancies above?

    Vacancies are one of the problems. What are the underlying causes? Personally, I don't like the idea of just pouring more water in, until we do something to fix the leak.
    I think it's mainly money tbh.

    You can earn similar with more social hours at the supermarket check in.
    Similar to who? Nurses?

    That's nonsense.
    Literally what the surgeon was saying to me yesterday.
    just because somebody is very good at cutting people up does not make them competent at comparing salaries between different sectors.

    I am amazed at you not questioning his wisdom by spending 20 seconds on Google.

    To save you the trouble, if we assume your check out staff works a 40 hour week then they are earning £21k a year. For qualified nurses the starting salary is £27k and the RCN puts the average at £33k. If we take that up to £40k to allow for the generous pension then your surgeon would only be correct if your checkout person was working a 80 week.
    "All the nurses in my ward quit and I now see a lot of them at the check in at the supermarket"

    Who am I to judge.

    Will not take heat for sharing what other people tell me.
    You would think that even if they have had enough of nursing they could find jobs other than working at a supermarket checkout with a degree to their name. Sounds like he was talking censored to me.

    I think that working on supermarket checkouts is quite therapeutic if you've had enough of workshit and mortal responsibility, especially if you still like meeting people and exchanging pleasantries.
    Probably why I can't imagine anyone choosing it!

    I'm not convinced being a checkout operator is a stress free as some think though (although probably less stressful than being a care worker who really does earn about the same as a shop worker).
  • rjsterry
    rjsterry Posts: 27,249
    Jeez, and I thought I was a miserable misanthrope. Most people are fine.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Part of the anti-growth coalition
  • My son's comprehensive school 6th form has 400 students. 4 of them went to Oxbridge. My son is fortunate to be one of them. Another 3 went to other Russell Group unis. His mate that dearly wanted to study medicine didn't get offered a place at any uni he applied for even though he got the grades. He's deferred for a year and hopefully has a place at Southampton.

    Well done to your son!

    My daughter’s A level year had circa 150 students, with approx 6 getting a full set of A* at A level but only one going to Oxbridge. Of no relevance, but a nice quirky stat, 4 of the 6 A* students were long-term members of the local swim squad.

  • Isn't 2000 an awfully large school? As in, the size if a Russel Group university.

    Am going to venture that private school is at least 1000% over represented.

    My sixth form had 2,500 pupils.
    Is that correct? The school must be a small town in its own right.
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 39,830

    Isn't 2000 an awfully large school? As in, the size if a Russel Group university.

    Am going to venture that private school is at least 1000% over represented.

    My sixth form had 2,500 pupils.
    Is that correct? The school must be a small town in its own right.
    .
    Possibly, there a some massive sixth form colleges around that serve multiple secondary schools. FWIW there doesn’t seem to be any secondary school covering 11-18 in England with 2,500 pupils.
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 71,586

    Isn't 2000 an awfully large school? As in, the size if a Russel Group university.

    Am going to venture that private school is at least 1000% over represented.

    My sixth form had 2,500 pupils.
    Is that correct? The school must be a small town in its own right.
    https://www.teachincambs.org.uk/schools/hills-road-sixth-form-college/

    Having responded to strong and sustained demand for places over a number of years, we now have nearly 2,700 full-time 16-19 students for whom we provide a choice of 35 A level subjects
  • Isn't 2000 an awfully large school? As in, the size if a Russel Group university.

    Am going to venture that private school is at least 1000% over represented.

    My sixth form had 2,500 pupils.
    Is that correct? The school must be a small town in its own right.
    https://www.teachincambs.org.uk/schools/hills-road-sixth-form-college/

    Having responded to strong and sustained demand for places over a number of years, we now have nearly 2,700 full-time 16-19 students for whom we provide a choice of 35 A level subjects
    Thanks. So if I’m reading it right, that’s a “6th form only” school that takes in younger kids from 18 schools in the the area. Efficient, if maybe rather impersonal!

  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 17,324
    edited January 2023
    .
    Pross said:

    Isn't 2000 an awfully large school? As in, the size if a Russel Group university.

    Am going to venture that private school is at least 1000% over represented.

    My sixth form had 2,500 pupils.
    Is that correct? The school must be a small town in its own right.
    .
    Possibly, there a some massive sixth form colleges around that serve multiple secondary schools. FWIW there doesn’t seem to be any secondary school covering 11-18 in England with 2,500 pupils.
    Exmouth Community College (11-18yo's) has capacity of 2850, but has 'just' 2226 on the books at the moment.

    Exeter College is a 6th-form college, but its capacity of 12,000 includes quite a few post 18yo's. Not sure what the numbers of 16-18yo's is, but it's big. EDIT - in 2014 it was about 5000 full time 16-19yo's.
  • TheBigBean
    TheBigBean Posts: 20,280

    Isn't 2000 an awfully large school? As in, the size if a Russel Group university.

    Am going to venture that private school is at least 1000% over represented.

    My sixth form had 2,500 pupils.
    Is that correct? The school must be a small town in its own right.
    https://www.teachincambs.org.uk/schools/hills-road-sixth-form-college/

    Having responded to strong and sustained demand for places over a number of years, we now have nearly 2,700 full-time 16-19 students for whom we provide a choice of 35 A level subjects
    Thanks. So if I’m reading it right, that’s a “6th form only” school that takes in younger kids from 18 schools in the the area. Efficient, if maybe rather impersonal!

    It's just a sixth form college. I really liked mind. Was treated like an adult. University was a step backwards. I think I read that students from sixth form colleges do better at university.
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 17,324

    Isn't 2000 an awfully large school? As in, the size if a Russel Group university.

    Am going to venture that private school is at least 1000% over represented.

    My sixth form had 2,500 pupils.
    Is that correct? The school must be a small town in its own right.
    https://www.teachincambs.org.uk/schools/hills-road-sixth-form-college/

    Having responded to strong and sustained demand for places over a number of years, we now have nearly 2,700 full-time 16-19 students for whom we provide a choice of 35 A level subjects
    Thanks. So if I’m reading it right, that’s a “6th form only” school that takes in younger kids from 18 schools in the the area. Efficient, if maybe rather impersonal!

    It's just a sixth form college. I really liked mind. Was treated like an adult. University was a step backwards. I think I read that students from sixth form colleges do better at university.

    That wouldn't surprise me at all, given that FE colleges tend to require more self-sufficiency from students. The squeezing of their budgets to the bone (including lower pay for FE lecturers compared with their school equivalents) has been shameful.
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 71,586

    Isn't 2000 an awfully large school? As in, the size if a Russel Group university.

    Am going to venture that private school is at least 1000% over represented.

    My sixth form had 2,500 pupils.
    Is that correct? The school must be a small town in its own right.
    https://www.teachincambs.org.uk/schools/hills-road-sixth-form-college/

    Having responded to strong and sustained demand for places over a number of years, we now have nearly 2,700 full-time 16-19 students for whom we provide a choice of 35 A level subjects
    Thanks. So if I’m reading it right, that’s a “6th form only” school that takes in younger kids from 18 schools in the the area. Efficient, if maybe rather impersonal!

    It's just a sixth form college. I really liked mind. Was treated like an adult. University was a step backwards. I think I read that students from sixth form colleges do better at university.
    Yeah it was much more like uni than school.

  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 25,228
    Reminds me of my first day at college when a tutor came out with the following statement. You are all adults now and are here to learn. If you don't want to learn then just leave.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.