Wheels with tubeless tyres

darrell1967
darrell1967 Posts: 470
edited September 2020 in Road buying advice
Hi,
I’ve just bought a set of Giant PR-2 wheels with Gavin AC1 tubeless tyres off eBay. They are the rim brake version and the seller says they need the sealant topping up.

Are these tyres going to give me a load of grief and are they worth having on my commuter?
I think I’ll hand them over to my lbs to re-seal.

Comments

  • lesfirth
    lesfirth Posts: 1,382
    What to some people is a bit of routine maintenance is a load of grief to others. It sounds like you,Darrell, are in the latter group.
    I run tubeless only because i can use lower pressures, which are more comfortable, without the fear of getting pinch punctures. You also get punctures that you do not know about,but fixing a puncture in a tube from time to time is no problem to me.
    If I were you i would use tubes. There is less to worry about.
  • lesfirth said:

    What to some people is a bit of routine maintenance is a load of grief to others. It sounds like you,Darrell, are in the latter group.

    I’m not sure why you think that.
    I’ve paid for the wheels and I’m picking them up tomorrow.

    I was simply asking a couple of questions. 🤷‍♀️
  • davidof
    davidof Posts: 3,065



    lesfirth said:

    What to some people is a bit of routine maintenance is a load of grief to others. It sounds like you,Darrell, are in the latter group.

    I’m not sure why you think that.
    I’ve paid for the wheels and I’m picking them up tomorrow.

    I was simply asking a couple of questions. 🤷‍♀️
    Because you will ask your lbs to add new sealant.
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  • Hi,
    I’ve just bought a set of Giant PR-2 wheels with Gavin AC1 tubeless tyres off eBay. They are the rim brake version and the seller says they need the sealant topping up.

    Are these tyres going to give me a load of grief and are they worth having on my commuter?
    I think I’ll hand them over to my lbs to re-seal.

    if they just need the sealant topping up then it should be a simple case of removing the valve cores and squirting sealant in using the correct quantities. there are a bunch of assumptions I'm making however
    1) the valve cores are removable - if not then its a case of popping the tyre off the rim, at that point you might as well remove it, clean the old sealant out and re-seat them with new sealant
    2) you know what sealant is in there already (its best not to mix and match as some sealants don't work well together.
    3) you're comfortable with the above and/or have the time to do so.

    I run tubeless on my road bike primarily for the puncture protection, the whole lower pressures thing is a bit of a moot point to me, I'd personally rather run a slightly higher pressure but each to their own, its horses for courses.

    ultimately mate as you only have the ebayers word on things if it was me I'd probably be removing the tyres, cleaning them out and re-seating them with new sealant. Tubeless can be a massive pain in the arse to get set up first time so depending on your technical skills and time constraints by all means support your local LBS and get them to do it, alternatively find out what sealant he used and simply put some more in and go, plenty of vids around on how to do either yourself.
  • davidof said:



    lesfirth said:

    What to some people is a bit of routine maintenance is a load of grief to others. It sounds like you,Darrell, are in the latter group.

    I’m not sure why you think that.
    I’ve paid for the wheels and I’m picking them up tomorrow.

    I was simply asking a couple of questions. 🤷‍♀️
    Because you will ask your lbs to add new sealant.
    Because I know nothing about adding the sealant etc but I’d like to try it out on a commuter I’m building.

  • lesfirth
    lesfirth Posts: 1,382



    lesfirth said:

    What to some people is a bit of routine maintenance is a load of grief to others. It sounds like you,Darrell, are in the latter group.

    I’m not sure why you think that.
    I’ve paid for the wheels and I’m picking them up tomorrow.

    I was simply asking a couple of questions. 🤷‍♀️
    No criticism was intended. We all have our strengths and weaknesses in life. I am good at practical things, like fixing bikes but useless at others.
    If you want to learn how to fix your bike yourself that is great but you cant do that if you take it to your LBS.
    Why Oxoman wants to pop his tyre off the rim to add sealant is beyond me. It is much easier to squirt it down the valve stem.
  • lesfirth said:



    lesfirth said:

    What to some people is a bit of routine maintenance is a load of grief to others. It sounds like you,Darrell, are in the latter group.

    I’m not sure why you think that.
    I’ve paid for the wheels and I’m picking them up tomorrow.

    I was simply asking a couple of questions. 🤷‍♀️
    No criticism was intended. We all have our strengths and weaknesses in life. I am good at practical things, like fixing bikes but useless at others.
    If you want to learn how to fix your bike yourself that is great but you cant do that if you take it to your LBS.
    Why Oxoman wants to pop his tyre off the rim to add sealant is beyond me. It is much easier to squirt it down the valve stem.
    No worries,
    I’m quite mechanically minded being a plumber and central heating engineer. I also do the easy servicing on my 2004 Porsche 911.
    Taking the bike to my lbs is an option because A, I don’t know what I’m doing and B, I haven’t got lots of time.
  • gethinceri
    gethinceri Posts: 1,575
    oxoman said:

    Les as mentioned I did it as a demo to prove how easy it is. Also far easier adding sealant my way than through a small piece of tube through the valve.

    completely the opposite for me.
    fill little bottle with sealant.
    deflate tyre.
    remove valve.
    insert tip of bottle into valve.
    squeeze sealant in.
    replace valve.
    inflate tyre (any pump).

    no worries about seating tyre, 2 minute job max.