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Seemingly trivial things that intrigue you

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  • ProssPross Posts: 22,557
    If you pay attention to the white/yellow lines painting on the edge of the platform it's easy to see where the doors typically stop, as the paint is usually much more discoloured.

    In this morning's example they were originally stood where one set of doors stop. It seems like some sort of instinct to move with the train as if it is going to pass them by, I see it regularly which is why it intrigued me. I've got to know where the doors tend to be and also which parts of the train are usually quietest. Maybe they usually travel by bus and think they have to get on at the front by the driver!
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 47,932 Lives Here
    It's a good way to push in front of the queue though, which I imagine is the real motive behind it.

    Real pros at commuting are able to strike a balance between being in the right carriage and part of the carriage to allow for the swiftest exit onwards out of the train and the station and a reliably vacant seat to reduce stress.

    I have a further complication in that I feel quite sick if I'm not in a window seat, and so need to account for both getting those and not being hemmed in by a regular who does not appreciate the urgency of departing the train on arrival.
  • ProssPross Posts: 22,557
    It's a good way to push in front of the queue though, which I imagine is the real motive behind it.

    Real pros at commuting are able to strike a balance between being in the right carriage and part of the carriage to allow for the swiftest exit onwards out of the train and the station and a reliably vacant seat to reduce stress.

    I have a further complication in that I feel quite sick if I'm not in a window seat, and so need to account for both getting those and not being hemmed in by a regular who does not appreciate the urgency of departing the train on arrival.

    You also need to identify the straggler getting off just as everyone thinks it is time to board who holds everything up.
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    It's a good way to push in front of the queue though, which I imagine is the real motive behind it.

    Real pros at commuting are able to strike a balance between being in the right carriage and part of the carriage to allow for the swiftest exit onwards out of the train and the station and a reliably vacant seat to reduce stress.

    I have a further complication in that I feel quite sick if I'm not in a window seat, and so need to account for both getting those and not being hemmed in by a regular who does not appreciate the urgency of departing the train on arrival.

    And I thought commuting by car via the A14 was stressful! Only 2 more months though; redundant at the end of October, so either retire early, or get a part time job I can cycle to. Happy days!
  • It's a good way to push in front of the queue though, which I imagine is the real motive behind it.

    Real pros at commuting are able to strike a balance between being in the right carriage and part of the carriage to allow for the swiftest exit onwards out of the train and the station and a reliably vacant seat to reduce stress.

    I have a further complication in that I feel quite sick if I'm not in a window seat, and so need to account for both getting those and not being hemmed in by a regular who does not appreciate the urgency of departing the train on arrival.

    lol - you have just described my thought process apart from I sit by the window to avoid the dreaded tap on the shoulder from somebody more deserving of a seat than me
  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 15,959
    Pross wrote:
    If you pay attention to the white/yellow lines painting on the edge of the platform it's easy to see where the doors typically stop, as the paint is usually much more discoloured.

    In this morning's example they were originally stood where one set of doors stop. It seems like some sort of instinct to move with the train as if it is going to pass them by, I see it regularly which is why it intrigued me. I've got to know where the doors tend to be and also which parts of the train are usually quietest. Maybe they usually travel by bus and think they have to get on at the front by the driver!

    There's also the thing that people are lazy - so if you wait til the train arrives you can beetle up the platform to the sharp end where nobody is waiting and grab your seat. But you don't want to wait up there as other people will realise you are expecting to get on at that spot and then they'll come and join you. Commuting psychology....
    Faster than a tent.......
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 47,932 Lives Here
    Pross wrote:
    It's a good way to push in front of the queue though, which I imagine is the real motive behind it.

    Real pros at commuting are able to strike a balance between being in the right carriage and part of the carriage to allow for the swiftest exit onwards out of the train and the station and a reliably vacant seat to reduce stress.

    I have a further complication in that I feel quite sick if I'm not in a window seat, and so need to account for both getting those and not being hemmed in by a regular who does not appreciate the urgency of departing the train on arrival.

    You also need to identify the straggler getting off just as everyone thinks it is time to board who holds everything up.

    No-one is getting off the London commuter train till it arrives at its London destination.

    This is however absolutely a factor for bagging seats on the tube. The overly polite "no you first" at the door you're waiting at whilst at the other door of the carriage people are already flooding in - rookie mistake.
  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 15,959
    Pross wrote:
    It's a good way to push in front of the queue though, which I imagine is the real motive behind it.

    Real pros at commuting are able to strike a balance between being in the right carriage and part of the carriage to allow for the swiftest exit onwards out of the train and the station and a reliably vacant seat to reduce stress.

    I have a further complication in that I feel quite sick if I'm not in a window seat, and so need to account for both getting those and not being hemmed in by a regular who does not appreciate the urgency of departing the train on arrival.

    You also need to identify the straggler getting off just as everyone thinks it is time to board who holds everything up.

    No-one is getting off the London commuter train till it arrives at its London destination.

    This is however absolutely a factor for bagging seats on the tube. The overly polite "no you first" at the door you're waiting at whilst at the other door of the carriage people are already flooding in - rookie mistake.

    East Croydon, Clapham Junction, London Bridge, Farringdon, Blackfriars etc etc - these are non terminal stations where folk get on and off.

    I often walk rather than take the tube.
    Faster than a tent.......
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 17,471
    Ah, East Croydon: gateway to paradise!
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 47,932 Lives Here
    Rolf F wrote:
    Pross wrote:
    It's a good way to push in front of the queue though, which I imagine is the real motive behind it.

    Real pros at commuting are able to strike a balance between being in the right carriage and part of the carriage to allow for the swiftest exit onwards out of the train and the station and a reliably vacant seat to reduce stress.

    I have a further complication in that I feel quite sick if I'm not in a window seat, and so need to account for both getting those and not being hemmed in by a regular who does not appreciate the urgency of departing the train on arrival.

    You also need to identify the straggler getting off just as everyone thinks it is time to board who holds everything up.

    No-one is getting off the London commuter train till it arrives at its London destination.

    This is however absolutely a factor for bagging seats on the tube. The overly polite "no you first" at the door you're waiting at whilst at the other door of the carriage people are already flooding in - rookie mistake.

    East Croydon, Clapham Junction, London Bridge, Farringdon, Blackfriars etc etc - these are non terminal stations where folk get on and off.

    I often walk rather than take the tube.

    That's what you get for being the wrong side of the river.

    My train is only commuter towns or London, so no worries about that.
  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 15,959
    Rolf F wrote:
    Pross wrote:
    It's a good way to push in front of the queue though, which I imagine is the real motive behind it.

    Real pros at commuting are able to strike a balance between being in the right carriage and part of the carriage to allow for the swiftest exit onwards out of the train and the station and a reliably vacant seat to reduce stress.

    I have a further complication in that I feel quite sick if I'm not in a window seat, and so need to account for both getting those and not being hemmed in by a regular who does not appreciate the urgency of departing the train on arrival.

    You also need to identify the straggler getting off just as everyone thinks it is time to board who holds everything up.

    No-one is getting off the London commuter train till it arrives at its London destination.

    This is however absolutely a factor for bagging seats on the tube. The overly polite "no you first" at the door you're waiting at whilst at the other door of the carriage people are already flooding in - rookie mistake.

    East Croydon, Clapham Junction, London Bridge, Farringdon, Blackfriars etc etc - these are non terminal stations where folk get on and off.

    I often walk rather than take the tube.

    That's what you get for being the wrong side of the river.

    My train is only commuter towns or London, so no worries about that.

    Thameslink censored does both sides of the river.

    Incidentally, I had a ticket from Reading to Haywards Heath the other week. I saved a tenner by buying one that excluded via London as it meant not going into London and was marginally quicker via Guildford anyway.

    Unfortunately I misread the return timetable. The train from HH to Reading is once an hour and arrives four minutes after the connection to Birmingham (also hourly) departs. After much mucking around on Nat Rail I discovered I could legitimately use my ticket to go via Clapham Junction and Basingstoke which doesn't count as London because it isn't a terminal. It's just all so needlessly complicated.

    PS Both sides of the river in London are the wrong side.....
    Faster than a tent.......
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 17,471
    Rolf F wrote:
    Pross wrote:
    It's a good way to push in front of the queue though, which I imagine is the real motive behind it.

    Real pros at commuting are able to strike a balance between being in the right carriage and part of the carriage to allow for the swiftest exit onwards out of the train and the station and a reliably vacant seat to reduce stress.

    I have a further complication in that I feel quite sick if I'm not in a window seat, and so need to account for both getting those and not being hemmed in by a regular who does not appreciate the urgency of departing the train on arrival.

    You also need to identify the straggler getting off just as everyone thinks it is time to board who holds everything up.

    No-one is getting off the London commuter train till it arrives at its London destination.

    This is however absolutely a factor for bagging seats on the tube. The overly polite "no you first" at the door you're waiting at whilst at the other door of the carriage people are already flooding in - rookie mistake.

    East Croydon, Clapham Junction, London Bridge, Farringdon, Blackfriars etc etc - these are non terminal stations where folk get on and off.

    I often walk rather than take the tube.

    That's what you get for being the wrong side of the river.

    My train is only commuter towns or London, so no worries about that.

    On the other hand, maybe there's a significance to nobody wanting to get off at your station :P

    Can honestly say I've never given this much brain space to being 8 seconds faster out of the station than the other guy. Definitely meets the trivial criteria.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 47,932 Lives Here
    My station is the beginning of the line mate!
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 17,471
    My station is the beginning of the line mate!
    That would be the significance, then.

    You'll no doubt be aware of the website which will give you optimum choices of carriage and doors for different tube journeys.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • shirley_bassoshirley_basso Posts: 3,022
    My station is the beginning of the line mate!

    I don't miss that journey. Don't you ride the 10 miles to the next station any more? My commute is now reduced to about 800m
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 47,932 Lives Here
    rjsterry wrote:
    My station is the beginning of the line mate!
    That would be the significance, then.

    You'll no doubt be aware of the website which will give you optimum choices of carriage and doors for different tube journeys.

    I have eyes and half a brain - no need for websites!
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 47,932 Lives Here
    My station is the beginning of the line mate!

    I don't miss that journey. Don't you ride the 10 miles to the next station any more? My commute is now reduced to about 800m

    I don't - Kings X now.

    Too much effort to get up even earlier atm; would rather spend that time with the little one as it's the only time I get during the week.
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 17,471
    rjsterry wrote:
    My station is the beginning of the line mate!
    That would be the significance, then.

    You'll no doubt be aware of the website which will give you optimum choices of carriage and doors for different tube journeys.

    I have eyes and half a brain - no need for websites!

    Depends whether you're just using the same two stations every time or much more erratic travel. For example when Thameslink is down and you come into Victoria to go up to KX, then down to Farringdon you want a different end of the District/Circle line train depending on the time as one of the gates is not open between 10 and 3.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • rjsterry wrote:
    rjsterry wrote:
    My station is the beginning of the line mate!
    That would be the significance, then.

    You'll no doubt be aware of the website which will give you optimum choices of carriage and doors for different tube journeys.

    I have eyes and half a brain - no need for websites!

    Depends whether you're just using the same two stations every time or much more erratic travel. For example when Thameslink is down and you come into Victoria to go up to KX, then down to Farringdon you want a different end of the District/Circle line train depending on the time as one of the gates is not open between 10 and 3.

    Chapeau

    I am mentally mapping Bank station - their signing is insane
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    Fark me. Who knew commuting was like the Krypton Factor meets the Crystal Maze? Or have I blundered into a round of Mornington Crescent??
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 17,471
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • bompingtonbompington Posts: 7,118
    Meanwhile, from my commute...
    29887563216_133c6ce634_b.jpg
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    That's more my kind of thing!
  • hopkinbhopkinb Posts: 5,465

    Chapeau

    I am mentally mapping Bank station - their signing is insane

    2 things about bank station:

    1. The little known stairs if you go past the lifts near the steps down to Northern line northbound platform, which take you straight up to the Northern gate line.
    2. The new (ish) Walbrook entrance/exit. Big & crowd free - ideal for access to the W&C, Northern, D&C and DLR, can also get to central, but more of a faff.
  • hopkinbhopkinb Posts: 5,465
    keef66 wrote:
    Fark me. Who knew commuting was like the Krypton Factor meets the Crystal Maze? Or have I blundered into a round of Mornington Crescent??

    Nah, get up, get on bike, ride to work. It's only when you have to take a train/tube that it's a pain.
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,571
    bompington wrote:
    Meanwhile, from my commute...
    29887563216_133c6ce634_b.jpg

    this, exactly 100%

    all this London stuff sounds like utter bollorcks. and only seeing your child once a day - whats that all about?

    #priorities
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • john80john80 Posts: 978
    bompington wrote:
    Meanwhile, from my commute...
    29887563216_133c6ce634_b.jpg

    this, exactly 100%

    all this London stuff sounds like utter bollorcks. and only seeing your child once a day - whats that all about?

    #priorities

    They are doing it so that when their children have left home the can sell the London pad and move to the North and then tell us all how uncultured we are whilst their kids don't visit them as they can't be arsed with the drive from their mates in London and they are bored out the 50 something minds.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 47,932 Lives Here
    bompington wrote:
    Meanwhile, from my commute...
    29887563216_133c6ce634_b.jpg

    this, exactly 100%

    all this London stuff sounds like utter bollorcks. and only seeing your child once a day - whats that all about?

    #priorities

    It's mainly so my wife can bring her up rather than someone in a nursery.

    We all make sacrifices for our kids, and the f*cking awful commute and not seeing her mid-week is mine.

    But what were you saying about unsolicited parenting advice?
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 17,471
    john80 wrote:
    bompington wrote:
    Meanwhile, from my commute...
    29887563216_133c6ce634_b.jpg

    this, exactly 100%

    all this London stuff sounds like utter bollorcks. and only seeing your child once a day - whats that all about?

    #priorities

    They are doing it so that when their children have left home the can sell the London pad and move to the North and then tell us all how uncultured we are whilst their kids don't visit them as they can't be arsed with the drive from their mates in London and they are bored out the 50 something minds.

    Have some ketchup with that massive chip.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • hopkinbhopkinb Posts: 5,465
    bompington wrote:
    Meanwhile, from my commute...
    29887563216_133c6ce634_b.jpg

    this, exactly 100%

    all this London stuff sounds like utter bollorcks. and only seeing your child once a day - whats that all about?

    #priorities

    All the cowshyte, yokelry, curtain twitching and incest gets on my nerves after a while. As does the monotony and monoculture. :wink:

    Good job we all like different things, or London [insert city of your choice] would be even fuller or the countryside wouldn't be the countryside.

    I see my kid before work and after work, take her to school and pick her up from school twice a week.

    I have a 35 to 40 minute ride to work.
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