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rear shox

bill89bill89 Posts: 12
edited September 2016 in MTB workshop & tech
I am pretty new to full suspension bikes ; just bought a mountain bike and the first thing I noticed is that my pedals touch the ground too often and I almost wiped out a few times .
It turns out the rear shock is defective and not fully extended , apparently causing the sag in the frame .
The shop sold it knowingly to me this way . I did not fully test ride the bike because I already tested same model in another shop .
But my main questions are :
1. Is there something else wrong here ? Is it the rear shock's job to support the frame and give ground clearance to the pedals ? This seems a little risky to me .
2. How long does it take Rock Shox to rebuild or replace the shock . The shop sent it out to Rock Shox .
3. Has anyone ever heard of a defective shock coming straight off the shop floor ?

Bike : 2016 Devinci Troy RS .

Posts

  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,904
    1 - Yes. What ese would hold it up? And why risky?
    2 - Probably sent to TF Tuned - about a week.
    3 - Yes it happens.

    Did you actually use a pump and set the correct sag?
    I don't do smileys.

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  • bill89bill89 Posts: 12
    1 . Risky because if it happens again ( shock fail ) , then I can wipe out when the peddles hit the ground . Obviously on a hardtail there is not this issue . Duh .
    2. OK . They really owe me a brand new one since I just bought the piece of censored and they knew it was defective .
    3. OK . How do you know exactly ?

    Your last question : Has nothing to do with what I did or didn't do . The shop sent it out for replacement or fix .
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,904
    1-What else could possibly hold the back end of a FS up except the shock? Anything else and it would be a hardtail.
    2 - OK. censored happens. Why do think they would knowingly sell a defective bike?
    3 - Defective goods slip through the QC net sometimes, censored happens.

    My last question - I was just wondering that if you were wondering what else could hold up the back end of a FS bike except for a shock, you may not be well versed in setting said shock up.
    I don't do smileys.

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  • bill89bill89 Posts: 12
    Can someone else chime in here ? I am done with the guy that has made 30000 posts .
  • HortonHorton Posts: 327
    1) Cooldad is spot on with his answers.

    2) his question is perfectly relevant - there is a chance that there is nothing wrong with the shock at all and it just simply wasn't set up correctly with enough pressure to support you hence your pedal strike issues

    3) A lot of (OK. Some) modern bikes do have quite low bottom brackets to help feel planted through corners which also means a higher chance of pedal strikes.

    4) Don't compare how riding a full Sus with a hard tail feels - they're different beasts. Some need you to alter your riding style more than others

    5) these numbers do not reflect your original numbered questions.
  • bill89bill89 Posts: 12
    edited August 2016
    You guys are just a bunch of smart-asses who seem to be offended by the fact that a shop sold me a defective shock . I don't need to explain myself to you . The shock is defective and more than one shop has told me so . I also know for a fact that the shop knew about it but I don't have to explain myself to you . I ask the questions . Not you .
    Anyway I am done . Fn internet nerds . I won't be around to see any more replies so stew in that for awhile .
  • HortonHorton Posts: 327
    bill89 wrote:
    Can someone else chime in here ? I am done with the guy that has made 30000 posts .

    If you read more than his two helpful posts on this thread you'll realise he's actually tried to help rather than point out that there is a chance you were just unlucky and got a faulty shock, combined with a general ignorance of fundamental engineering and design meaning you don't know how the bike you bought works and rides in real life, He wasn't even rude (yet).
  • HortonHorton Posts: 327
    bill89 wrote:
    You guys are just a bunch of smart-asses who seem to be offended by the fact that a shop sold me a defective shock . I don't need to explain myself to you . The shock is defective and more than one shop has told me so . I also know for a fact that the shop knew about it but I don't have to explain myself to you . I ask the questions . Not you .
    Anyway I am done . Fn internet nerds . I won't be around to see any more replies so stew in that for awhile .

    Wow - that escalated quickly... I blame Cooldad
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,904
    I blame Wiggle.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

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  • bill89 wrote:
    You guys are just a bunch of smart-asses who seem to be offended by the fact that a shop sold me a defective shock . I don't need to explain myself to you . The shock is defective and more than one shop has told me so . I also know for a fact that the shop knew about it but I don't have to explain myself to you . I ask the questions . Not you .
    Anyway I am done . Fn snooty internet nerds . I won't be around to see any more replies so stew in that for awhile .

    The suggestion was that perhaps the bike could have been supplied to you with not enough air pressure in the shock and the excessive sag was causing pedal strikes.

    To answer your original questions:

    1. Yes, the shock is effectively supporting the rear end via linkage but there is tolerance built in where by if the shock were to fail then using the full length of its stroke (full travel) will not result in pedals dragging on the floor or rear tyre fouling the seat tube.

    2. The shock will probably tgo to SRAM's warranty centre in Berkshire and turnaround is approx a week depending on how busy they are at the time.

    3. Yes, more than feasible for a shock to fail fresh out of the factory. This could be down to a defective component within the shock or bad assembly. Myself I've had a damper cartride fail on a set of forks after 2 rides.

    Lastly, stop being an censored hat.
    Bird Aeris : Trek Remedy 9.9 29er : Trek Procaliber 9.8 SL
  • HortonHorton Posts: 327
    cooldad wrote:
    I blame Wiggle.

    Thought you might...
  • JGTRJGTR Posts: 1,404
    Anyway I am done . Fn internet nerds . I won't be around to see any more replies so stew in that for awhile .

    The fact you can work a computer but fail to grasp the most basic of engineering principles says to me that you are the F'n internet nerd.

    I bet you didn't even pump the shock up.
  • haydenmhaydenm Posts: 2,868
    Jesus, he didn't react well to that. I don't see anything in cooldad's answers to get offended by really.

    I think the root of the problem here is that it's 'shock' not 'shox'...
  • dirkpitt74dirkpitt74 Posts: 518
    Pedal strikes - probably need to change your riding style or read the trail a bit better.
    As pointed out the BB height on modern bikes is quite low - but also dependant on the terrain you're riding and how you're riding.

    Quite possible that the shock can fail straight out of the box - could be for any number of reasons i.e. faulty O-ring etc.

    Did the shop help you with set-up of the shock? I would have expected them to adjust the pressure to get set the sag to your weight before you rode it out of the shop.

    As also pointed out the rear shock supports the back end of the bike - not enough pressure and it'll bottom out. If it fails in use it'll just bottom out - which will not mean the world will end or start a zombie apocalypse.

    I would have thought that Rock Shox/SRAM warranty turnaround was pretty quick.

    Welcome to the forum buy the way.
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,747
    I didn't get the answer I insisted you gave to the question I asked, which wasn't actually a question but a statement you were meant to agree with......that's how I read it, but that aside.....

    1/ yes the shock (it's actually a combined spring and damper) holds the rear up, nothing else can or the shock couldn't do its work and it would be a hardtail, if the shock fails the shock will go to full sag which would still allow pedaling on absolutely flat ground on most bikes but not all. That applies to ALL full suspension bikes.

    2/ it seems more likely the shock wasn't set up right than that is was completely faulty as you clearly didn't set it up from what you say, so that's a combination of you and the shop at fault.

    As an introduction to the forum you've not done well, and as for Internet nerds, no, we ride bikes which is why we know as much about them as we do, which is clearly more than you.
  • hainmanhainman Posts: 699
    if the shock isn't holding your rear end up.its either borked,or you don't have enough air in it,when sat on it at a stand still you should only really be using about 1/4 of the travel,but maybe more/less,
    I had a shock fail,due to the damper being dubbed,was sent out a rebuilt shock with new improved damper,in same can,but different setting which was a PITA,take it back to shop and ask them to set the sag up right or tell you if its F*CKED
    Giant Reign 2
    Crohnie
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,904
    Wasting your time. He hasn't been back since his flounce.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

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  • Who lit the fuse on his tampon?
    I'd have replied to his original post with a simple RTFM. A tenner says he didn't set up the shock and there's censored all air in it.
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