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Folding Road Bike?!

Ajay1993Ajay1993 Posts: 2
edited September 2015 in Road beginners
Hey guys,

I'm new here, have been a lurker for a while - please be nice!! :P

I am looking at purchasing my first road bike and came across some folding ones on the internet:http://www.foldingbikeguy.com
I was wondering if anyone has any experience using these and if they are worth purchasing - would be nice to be able to easily carry my bike around...

Thanks :)

Posts

  • If you want a folding road bike, ie a folding bike with drop handlebars, then the only ones I've seen are Moulton:

    http://www.moultonbicycles.co.uk/models.html

    But they aint exactly cheap!
  • term1teterm1te Posts: 1,462
    I've no personal experience of them, but an Airnimal folding bike might be what you're after? Again, not cheap...http://airnimal.eu/
  • Ritchey make the Break Away which is foldable, though aimed more at taking away whilst travelling than daily commute/folding.

    http://www.pezcyclingnews.com/tech-n-spec/ritchey-carbon-breakaway-review/

    Again not exactly cheap.

    Really depends on how you plan to use it/budget/compromises happy to accept.
  • Mad_MalxMad_Malx Posts: 4,033
    OP - where are you? Website you link is US I think, these makes aren't seen much over here (UK)

    Bromptons are the most popular in uk, particularly with commuters. They are well engineered to pack small and fast as carryon luggage on trains. There are unofficial competitions every morning at commuter stations when riders see who can reassemble the fastest - and it's only a few seconds.

    http://www.foldingbikes.co.uk/ has a few different makes (I have no commercial interest and don't have one).
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    Why do you need to carry your bike around with you ? I ride mine. Much easier.
  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    Small wheels are a big compromise in terms of speed and comfort so it really depends on what your priorities are. For full-size the options are the aforementioned Ritchey Breakaway or getting a frame built with S+S couplings - having had both there is no detriment to performance, but they're not designed for daily disassembly, more for the occasional trip. For small-wheeled performance bikes, there's also the Bike Friday - had a ride on one once and it was really nippy, whereas the Airnimal compromised speed for comfort.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • Mad_MalxMad_Malx Posts: 4,033
    OP not been back. Maybe just trying to flag up his own site?
  • mercia_manmercia_man Posts: 1,368
    Small wheels are a big compromise in terms of speed and comfort so it really depends on what your priorities are. For full-size the options are the aforementioned Ritchey Breakaway or getting a frame built with S+S couplings - having had both there is no detriment to performance, but they're not designed for daily disassembly, more for the occasional trip. For small-wheeled performance bikes, there's also the Bike Friday - had a ride on one once and it was really nippy, whereas the Airnimal compromised speed for comfort.

    Bike Fridays are a good option if you are looking for a foldable drop bar performance road bike that will pack into a standard size suitcase or soft bag. You can even tow the suitcase as a trailer behind you carrying camping gear. I've done that several times after flying out (no baggage charges) to the Alps and Pyrenees, and also on train and bus journeys to touring areas.

    I have a Pocket Rocket. Its rolling resistance is greater than a 700c wheel bike so you can't freewheel as far or as quickly but the small wheels mean there is less wind resistance so it is quicker riding into a headwind. Handling and stability are superb. I've been up and down many big mountain passes on mine, including the Bonette. For speed, on my regular 20-mile training route, it is quicker than my classic 531 steel tourer but slower than my carbon road bikes. I have no problem keeping up with other riders on regular bikes on group rides. Bike Fridays are custom built (in Eugene, Oregon), so the riding position replicates your favourite ordinary bike. However, 20in wheels with high pressure tyres mean a harsher ride on rough roads than a 700c wheel bike. Rear braking and rear mech operation are compromised due to long and convoluted cable runs necessary for folding but good cables and maintenance help. Narrow tyres and tubes and replacement rims (451 or 406 size depending on which model you have) are a bit thin on the ground but available easily enough on the internet. As Monty says, it's a bit more sporty feeling than the Airnimal - which is a later Far East built variation on the Bike Friday theme.

    The main problem for UK riders is availability and price. Avon Valley Cyclery in Bath used to sell Bike Fridays and spares and I suspect may still do them on special order but the cheaper Airnimals have largely taken over the UK market.

    One option is buy direct from the factory. They are really good people to deal with. You will be stung with duty when it is shipped to you. Or you could go on a holiday to Oregon, collect your bike, ride around for a bit and return with your "used" bike in a suitcase and escape paying duty (that's what a friend did).
  • Mad_MalxMad_Malx Posts: 4,033
    ^That's really useful information, thanks Merciaman.

    The folding bike link I mentioned above is part of or sister company of Avon Valley Cyclery and lists the pocket rocket.
  • bmxboy10bmxboy10 Posts: 1,860
    I converted a Monague Boston to drop bars as this is the only way to get a 700c road bike that folds. Not a bad bike really but not very inspiring to ride
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