Forum home Road cycling forum Road beginners

Got my bike, what do i learn now?

BlackHat2BlackHat2 Posts: 8
edited July 2015 in Road beginners
Found a post on what should i get now (clothing, mitts, saddlebag, etc)
Nothing found on what should i LEARN now.

Already learnt how to change inner tube.
Any tutorial on correct riding position? Did my first hour today and had neck pain.
On how to set the saddle height/position (further ahead or take it back a lil)
Diet tips? I'm skinny, Tour de France winner skinny (1.78, 55Kg) and absolutely need to lose as little weight as possible, even better if i get some as muscle mass.
Tips on training/resting intervals? I plan going out as much as possible, don't want all that money to sit hanging in my garage.
Anything else you reccomend

Posts

  • sungodsungod Posts: 12,662
    make sure the bike is set correctly for you, the pain may simply be due to getting used to riding or it ma be due to wrong set-up

    plenty of good advice here on the subject... https://www.stevehoggbikefitting.com/faq/

    learn to ride safely - awareness of others, avoiding the gutter, recognizing/handling poor/dangerous road surfaces and other hazads, defensive road positioning, holding line, signals etc. etc.

    mechanical stuff, learn how to index gears, adjust brakes and do basic safety/operational maintenance

    if you want to maintain weight you need to eat to replace energy used, maintain a good diet, if you start dropping eat more, cycling is not really a sport for adding muscle, you'd do better adding some weight/similar training if that's a goal

    you're asking many things, there is a search function, if you find a few related threads and read through you'll probably pick up more info faster

    for training tips look in viewforum.php?f=40011
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • stu-bimstu-bim Posts: 406
    Check out gcn channel on YouTube

    Plenty of top ten stuff for beginners

    That'll at least broaden your idea of questions to ask here
    Raleigh RX 2.0
    Diamondback Outlook
    Planet X Pro Carbon
  • BlackHat2BlackHat2 Posts: 8
    Thanks a lot for both.
    Gaining weight is not a goal, not losing it is.
    Already watching GCN, probably the best stuff around
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,003
    For now - just ride it.
  • stu-bimstu-bim Posts: 406
    GCN is good for the Donald Rumsfeld factor

    http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/d/donaldrums148142.html
    Raleigh RX 2.0
    Diamondback Outlook
    Planet X Pro Carbon
  • KajjalKajjal Posts: 3,404
    Learn to use your gears properly, until you do cycling will be alot harder than it needs to he.
  • stu-bimstu-bim Posts: 406
    Learn to use your gears properly, until you do cycling will be alot harder than it needs to he.

    +1, learn to spin around 90-100 asap to save your knees
    Raleigh RX 2.0
    Diamondback Outlook
    Planet X Pro Carbon
  • BlackHat2BlackHat2 Posts: 8
    Learn to use your gears properly, until you do cycling will be alot harder than it needs to he.
    Been doing. Is it all about about anticipation and chooosing the right one (to be above 80 RPM usually) or is there something else?
    Gonna do a lot of climbing, so far I only accomplish good RPM on the lighter one (34 crank, 32 cassete). It's fairly step and I'm completely out of shape.
  • dj58dj58 Posts: 2,132
    [quote/
    Gonna do a lot of climbing, so far I only accomplish good RPM on the lighter one (34 crank, 32 cassete). It's fairly step and I'm completely out of shape.[/quote]

    Yes that sounds right for a beginner, practice and hours/mileage in the saddle is the way, then you will be able to do those same climbs in your, 34T x 28T gear.
  • TjgoodhewTjgoodhew Posts: 628
    Ride your bike as much as you can and a lot of things you will learn by trial and error. Its all part of the fun.

    Dont be afraid to fix things yourself instead of heading straight to the LBS when you have a problem. Things like gear indexing, adjusting brakes, changing cassette etc.. are all pretty straight forward with the help of youtube. Buy tools when you need them and before you know it you will have a fully stocked toolkit
    Cannondale Caad8
    Canyon Aeroad 8.0

    http://www.strava.com/athletes/goodhewt
  • Roux_guyRoux_guy Posts: 92
    I'll second riding as much as you can. I got back on my bike almost exactly two years ago. The first thousand miles are hard work, I'd be completely knackered doing 7 or 8 miles but within a year and a half I did the Manchester-Blackpool in under 3 hours. The fitness will come but you basically gotta ride, don't over do it though. Start by doing whatever mileage you can 2 or 3 times a week and extend the distance whenever you feel up to it. Most of all, enjoy it - don't let it become a chore.
  • lmcamoeslmcamoes Posts: 51
    90 to 100 rmp? Is that not to much?
  • ai_1ai_1 Posts: 3,060
    90 to 100 rmp? Is that not to much?
    Nope.
    90 to 100 is ideal for many people and is by no means extreme.
    I consider anything getting down towards 85 as a bit too low although I do ride around that cadence when I'm doing a TT type effort. When I'm riding well and cruising I tend to be closer to 95 but have often found myself comfortably spinning along at 105.
  • BlackHat2BlackHat2 Posts: 8
    90 to 100 rmp? Is that not to much?
    Nope.
    90 to 100 is ideal for many people and is by no means extreme.
    I consider anything getting down towards 85 as a bit too low although I do ride around that cadence when I'm doing a TT type effort. When I'm riding well and cruising I tend to be closer to 95 but have often found myself comfortably spinning along at 105.
    Anyway to measure with no computer?
  • ai_1ai_1 Posts: 3,060
    90 to 100 rmp? Is that not to much?
    Nope.
    90 to 100 is ideal for many people and is by no means extreme.
    I consider anything getting down towards 85 as a bit too low although I do ride around that cadence when I'm doing a TT type effort. When I'm riding well and cruising I tend to be closer to 95 but have often found myself comfortably spinning along at 105.
    Anyway to measure with no computer?
    You can count but obviously you'll still need a timer of some sort to know how much time has passed - a watch might do.
    Cadence is just pedal rpm so pick a foot and count how many times it goes around in say 20 seconds (and triple it) or 30 seconds (and double it) or count for a full minute. Easy but inconvenient.
Sign In or Register to comment.