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BREXIT - I Think We Need Some Lorry Drivers 🇪🇺 🚛🚛

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  • briantrumpetbriantrumpet Posts: 7,634
    Stevo_666 said:

    Hmm, that's curious, business leaders don't like home-grown UK red tape any more than EU red tape. Maybe the EU wasn't the problem after all...

    "Whilst Brexit promised less red tape, these reforms go completely against that commitment,” says Jonathan Fisher QC of the firm Bright Line Law.

    “Accountants and auditors will be faced with additional regulatory requirements that could stifle growth as much more time will be spent meeting these new measures, which will increase the cost to clients."

    “Now that we have left the EU there is the opportunity for a UK domestic definition of PIEs [public interest entities] to include larger firms currently excluded and a far more proportionate approach for smaller, simpler organisations,” BSA’s Fieth adds.

    Among the most controversial proposals in the White Paper is a plan to impose fines and bans on directors for inaccuracies in their companies’ accounts. Ministers hope that ensuring directors have “skin in the game” will improve financial reporting and controls.


    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2021/07/08/businesses-rebel-against-audit-reforms-threaten-brexit-freedoms/
    That's an odd view from someone who thinks that ever more regulation of these nasty feral companies is a good thing.

    What do you think my 'odd view' is? I merely observed that it seems to be regulation, per se, that appears to be the problem, not who administers it, if this report is to be believed (which I assume it is, being in The Telegraph).

    (And if you'd be so kind to remind us where I've argued for more regulation.)
  • briantrumpetbriantrumpet Posts: 7,634
    Stevo_666 said:

    rjsterry said:

    Hmm, that's curious, business leaders don't like home-grown UK red tape any more than EU red tape. Maybe the EU wasn't the problem after all...

    "Whilst Brexit promised less red tape, these reforms go completely against that commitment,” says Jonathan Fisher QC of the firm Bright Line Law.

    “Accountants and auditors will be faced with additional regulatory requirements that could stifle growth as much more time will be spent meeting these new measures, which will increase the cost to clients."

    “Now that we have left the EU there is the opportunity for a UK domestic definition of PIEs [public interest entities] to include larger firms currently excluded and a far more proportionate approach for smaller, simpler organisations,” BSA’s Fieth adds.

    Among the most controversial proposals in the White Paper is a plan to impose fines and bans on directors for inaccuracies in their companies’ accounts. Ministers hope that ensuring directors have “skin in the game” will improve financial reporting and controls.


    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2021/07/08/businesses-rebel-against-audit-reforms-threaten-brexit-freedoms/
    F*** business (except for close personal friends) continues.
    That is the Cake Stop view, it would seem.

    Err, who on Cake Stop says that? From what I see, most of the active members here are, er, in businesses. I've not seen anyone wanting to f*** them.
  • Stevo_666Stevo_666 Posts: 46,827

    Stevo_666 said:

    Hmm, that's curious, business leaders don't like home-grown UK red tape any more than EU red tape. Maybe the EU wasn't the problem after all...

    "Whilst Brexit promised less red tape, these reforms go completely against that commitment,” says Jonathan Fisher QC of the firm Bright Line Law.

    “Accountants and auditors will be faced with additional regulatory requirements that could stifle growth as much more time will be spent meeting these new measures, which will increase the cost to clients."

    “Now that we have left the EU there is the opportunity for a UK domestic definition of PIEs [public interest entities] to include larger firms currently excluded and a far more proportionate approach for smaller, simpler organisations,” BSA’s Fieth adds.

    Among the most controversial proposals in the White Paper is a plan to impose fines and bans on directors for inaccuracies in their companies’ accounts. Ministers hope that ensuring directors have “skin in the game” will improve financial reporting and controls.


    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2021/07/08/businesses-rebel-against-audit-reforms-threaten-brexit-freedoms/
    That's an odd view from someone who thinks that ever more regulation of these nasty feral companies is a good thing.

    What do you think my 'odd view' is? I merely observed that it seems to be regulation, per se, that appears to be the problem, not who administers it, if this report is to be believed (which I assume it is, being in The Telegraph).

    (And if you'd be so kind to remind us where I've argued for more regulation.)
    I thought you would be all for it. I clearly recall you arguing that more regulation = better, which is a bit odd for someone who has no experience in this area.

    If that isn't the case, just say that less regulation is better and all will be good.
    "I spent most of my money on birds, booze and fast cars: the rest of it I just squandered." [George Best]
  • Stevo_666Stevo_666 Posts: 46,827

    Stevo_666 said:

    rjsterry said:

    Hmm, that's curious, business leaders don't like home-grown UK red tape any more than EU red tape. Maybe the EU wasn't the problem after all...

    "Whilst Brexit promised less red tape, these reforms go completely against that commitment,” says Jonathan Fisher QC of the firm Bright Line Law.

    “Accountants and auditors will be faced with additional regulatory requirements that could stifle growth as much more time will be spent meeting these new measures, which will increase the cost to clients."

    “Now that we have left the EU there is the opportunity for a UK domestic definition of PIEs [public interest entities] to include larger firms currently excluded and a far more proportionate approach for smaller, simpler organisations,” BSA’s Fieth adds.

    Among the most controversial proposals in the White Paper is a plan to impose fines and bans on directors for inaccuracies in their companies’ accounts. Ministers hope that ensuring directors have “skin in the game” will improve financial reporting and controls.


    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2021/07/08/businesses-rebel-against-audit-reforms-threaten-brexit-freedoms/
    F*** business (except for close personal friends) continues.
    That is the Cake Stop view, it would seem.

    Err, who on Cake Stop says that? From what I see, most of the active members here are, er, in businesses. I've not seen anyone wanting to f*** them.
    I'm just waiting for the torrent of Cake Stoppers posting to say that corporates are overburdened with rules and regs....let's hear it folks?
    "I spent most of my money on birds, booze and fast cars: the rest of it I just squandered." [George Best]
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 57,382 Lives Here
    Stevo_666 said:

    Stevo_666 said:

    rjsterry said:

    Hmm, that's curious, business leaders don't like home-grown UK red tape any more than EU red tape. Maybe the EU wasn't the problem after all...

    "Whilst Brexit promised less red tape, these reforms go completely against that commitment,” says Jonathan Fisher QC of the firm Bright Line Law.

    “Accountants and auditors will be faced with additional regulatory requirements that could stifle growth as much more time will be spent meeting these new measures, which will increase the cost to clients."

    “Now that we have left the EU there is the opportunity for a UK domestic definition of PIEs [public interest entities] to include larger firms currently excluded and a far more proportionate approach for smaller, simpler organisations,” BSA’s Fieth adds.

    Among the most controversial proposals in the White Paper is a plan to impose fines and bans on directors for inaccuracies in their companies’ accounts. Ministers hope that ensuring directors have “skin in the game” will improve financial reporting and controls.


    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2021/07/08/businesses-rebel-against-audit-reforms-threaten-brexit-freedoms/
    F*** business (except for close personal friends) continues.
    That is the Cake Stop view, it would seem.

    Err, who on Cake Stop says that? From what I see, most of the active members here are, er, in businesses. I've not seen anyone wanting to f*** them.
    I'm just waiting for the torrent of Cake Stoppers posting to say that corporates are overburdened with rules and regs....let's hear it folks?
    Are they?

    What rules and regs do you have in your crosshairs?

    Child labour regs?

  • morstarmorstar Posts: 4,663
    It’s that pesky health and safety innit.
    Waste of bloody time.
    The Middle East has demonstrated how to prepare for a World Cup in a cost effective manner using slave labour and an alarming mortality rate.
    I’m all for appropriate legislation which is what I believe we do have in general. No doubt exceptions can be found through both poorly conceived or poorly executed legislation but low regs simply means profit at the cost of people and standards.
  • morstarmorstar Posts: 4,663
    If you don’t have regulations in business, the lowest costs are achieved by those with the lowest standards of behaviour.
    Heck why not let people with no ethics do whatever they want. I’m sure that will work out fine.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 57,382 Lives Here
    edited 9 July
    I would have more sympathy with the “no regs” people if they came with a bunch of specific regs and why they’re so bad.


    Like, if someone else here was a recruiter and said that GDPR needed to go or at least change, because, for example, it's now a fairly dangerous practice to record poor references on people on your database, I would have some sympathy.
  • briantrumpetbriantrumpet Posts: 7,634

    I would have more sympathy with the “no regs” people if they came with a bunch of specific regs and why they’re so bad.


    Like, if someone else here was a recruiter and said that GDPR needed to go or at least change, because, for example, it's now a fairly dangerous practice to record poor references on people on your database, I would have some sympathy.


    It's the same old story... they'll talk about a 'bonfire of red tape', and then find that all that red tape was there for a reason... and one of the main reasons is that clever people will exploit loopholes in any regulations, so there is a gradual tightening up of regulations to counter the exploitation of loopholes.
  • briantrumpetbriantrumpet Posts: 7,634
    Haha, didn't think it would be too long before The Telegraph lumped the Euros and Brexit under the same flag.


  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 57,382 Lives Here
    That issue I described is a real pain by the way.

    You're not really allowed to get around it with codes as the regulator may spot the code and ask for what it means.

  • ProssPross Posts: 29,623
    I think you're all missing the issue. Red tape is fine as long as it is our red tape - the problem was with Johnny Foreigner tying us up in their red tape and making good old British bananas need to be straighter. We didn't like it being forced on us - we have the current red tape because we want it (or something like that).
  • skyblueamateurskyblueamateur Posts: 692
    Pross said:

    I think you're all missing the issue. Red tape is fine as long as it is our red tape - the problem was with Johnny Foreigner tying us up in their red tape and making good old British bananas need to be straighter. We didn't like it being forced on us - we have the current red tape because we want it (or something like that).

    That is UKCA in an absolute nutshell.
  • ProssPross Posts: 29,623

    Haha, didn't think it would be too long before The Telegraph lumped the Euros and Brexit under the same flag.


    Is it along the lines of "Now out of the shackles of Brussels our brave boys have been able to reignite the blitz spirit and play with a new found freedom more in keeping with our natural desire for adventure as typified by the likes of Raleigh, Cook, Livingston and Shackleton"
  • morstarmorstar Posts: 4,663

    I would have more sympathy with the “no regs” people if they came with a bunch of specific regs and why they’re so bad.


    Like, if someone else here was a recruiter and said that GDPR needed to go or at least change, because, for example, it's now a fairly dangerous practice to record poor references on people on your database, I would have some sympathy.


    It's the same old story... they'll talk about a 'bonfire of red tape', and then find that all that red tape was there for a reason... and one of the main reasons is that clever people will exploit loopholes in any regulations, so there is a gradual tightening up of regulations to counter the exploitation of loopholes.
    Ironic that one of the people on here who makes a living explicitly navigating regulations to the benefit of his employer is the one championing a reduction.
    I guess sacrificing yourself for the greater good is an uncharacteristic act of selflessness.
  • Stevo_666Stevo_666 Posts: 46,827
    Stevo_666 said:

    Stevo_666 said:

    rjsterry said:

    Hmm, that's curious, business leaders don't like home-grown UK red tape any more than EU red tape. Maybe the EU wasn't the problem after all...

    "Whilst Brexit promised less red tape, these reforms go completely against that commitment,” says Jonathan Fisher QC of the firm Bright Line Law.

    “Accountants and auditors will be faced with additional regulatory requirements that could stifle growth as much more time will be spent meeting these new measures, which will increase the cost to clients."

    “Now that we have left the EU there is the opportunity for a UK domestic definition of PIEs [public interest entities] to include larger firms currently excluded and a far more proportionate approach for smaller, simpler organisations,” BSA’s Fieth adds.

    Among the most controversial proposals in the White Paper is a plan to impose fines and bans on directors for inaccuracies in their companies’ accounts. Ministers hope that ensuring directors have “skin in the game” will improve financial reporting and controls.


    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2021/07/08/businesses-rebel-against-audit-reforms-threaten-brexit-freedoms/
    F*** business (except for close personal friends) continues.
    That is the Cake Stop view, it would seem.

    Err, who on Cake Stop says that? From what I see, most of the active members here are, er, in businesses. I've not seen anyone wanting to f*** them.
    I'm just waiting for the torrent of Cake Stoppers posting to say that corporates are overburdened with rules and regs....let's hear it folks?
    As expected, there hasn't been a mad rush on this one :smile:
    "I spent most of my money on birds, booze and fast cars: the rest of it I just squandered." [George Best]
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 20,768
    Maybe because we can spot your strawman a mile off.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • tailwindhometailwindhome Posts: 16,674
    Paging @TheBigBean to the thread



    Believe that a farther shore
    Is reachable from here.
    Believe in miracles
    And cures and healing wells
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 23,212
    Finding out it really was all just a game today was rather unedifying...

    Even Laura K almost looked shocked
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 57,382 Lives Here

    Paging @TheBigBean to the thread



    Populist policy boon for criminals shocker
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 16,819
    edited 21 July
    Lord Frost finally coming to the Cakestop view of the N.I. Protocol.
    (Bold parts highlighted by myself.)

    "But Lord Frost says its implementation is unbalanced and unsustainable.
    The Brexit minister will explain the government's proposals in a statement to Parliament later.
    The deal was negotiated by Lord Frost but he is expected to say the Protocol needs to be radically changed."
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • TheBigBeanTheBigBean Posts: 14,072

    Paging @TheBigBean to the thread



    I can't see the nationalists or anyone in ROI wanting to eat unionist branded sausages, so what can go wrong?
  • surrey_commutersurrey_commuter Posts: 14,603
    pblakeney said:

    Lord Frost finally coming to the Cakestop view of the N.I. Protocol.
    (Bold parts highlighted by myself.)

    "But Lord Frost says its implementation is unbalanced and unsustainable.
    The Brexit minister will explain the government's proposals in a statement to Parliament later.
    The deal was negotiated by Lord Frost but he is expected to say the Protocol needs to be radically changed."

    I still think he is just kicking the can down the road until the supermarkets sort out their supply chains
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 16,819

    pblakeney said:

    Lord Frost finally coming to the Cakestop view of the N.I. Protocol.
    (Bold parts highlighted by myself.)

    "But Lord Frost says its implementation is unbalanced and unsustainable.
    The Brexit minister will explain the government's proposals in a statement to Parliament later.
    The deal was negotiated by Lord Frost but he is expected to say the Protocol needs to be radically changed."

    I still think he is just kicking the can down the road until the supermarkets sort out their supply chains
    He can kick it as far as he likes. There is no solution that will satisfy all parties.
    He might as well admit it.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • surrey_commutersurrey_commuter Posts: 14,603
    pblakeney said:

    pblakeney said:

    Lord Frost finally coming to the Cakestop view of the N.I. Protocol.
    (Bold parts highlighted by myself.)

    "But Lord Frost says its implementation is unbalanced and unsustainable.
    The Brexit minister will explain the government's proposals in a statement to Parliament later.
    The deal was negotiated by Lord Frost but he is expected to say the Protocol needs to be radically changed."

    I still think he is just kicking the can down the road until the supermarkets sort out their supply chains
    He can kick it as far as he likes. There is no solution that will satisfy all parties.
    He might as well admit it.
    You miss my point.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 16,819

    pblakeney said:

    pblakeney said:

    Lord Frost finally coming to the Cakestop view of the N.I. Protocol.
    (Bold parts highlighted by myself.)

    "But Lord Frost says its implementation is unbalanced and unsustainable.
    The Brexit minister will explain the government's proposals in a statement to Parliament later.
    The deal was negotiated by Lord Frost but he is expected to say the Protocol needs to be radically changed."

    I still think he is just kicking the can down the road until the supermarkets sort out their supply chains
    He can kick it as far as he likes. There is no solution that will satisfy all parties.
    He might as well admit it.
    You miss my point.
    I think the problem is bigger than supermarket supply chains, but yes, probably missed your point.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 23,212
    The supply chain problem in GB is getting hard to ignore now. The local supermarket is nearly down to just turnips...
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • darkhairedlorddarkhairedlord Posts: 7,094
    ddraver said:

    The supply chain problem in GB is getting hard to ignore now. The local supermarket is nearly down to just turnips...

    A chance to try forgotten vegetables? Another brexit win.
  • TheBigBeanTheBigBean Posts: 14,072
    ddraver said:

    The supply chain problem in GB is getting hard to ignore now. The local supermarket is nearly down to just turnips...

    Isn't that one for the pingdemic/driving thread?
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