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BREXIT - I Think We Need Some Lorry Drivers 🇪🇺 🚛🚛

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  • surrey_commutersurrey_commuter Posts: 14,603

    rjsterry said:

    Anyone else surprised at the naïve attitude Frost is showing at these hearings?

    Basically all the things people said would likely happen he now says weren't expected and they're 'surprised'

    I am not surprised by him pretending to be surprised.
    It is such red meat for "I told you so" people (of which I am a paid up member).
    Based on the fact that he chose to wear Union Jack socks to the G7 I would assume that he has a lot of surprises in his life
    I can assure you they are fairly regular attire for a certain kind of City duffer.
    and I imagine that they have many surprises in their lives
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 57,381 Lives Here
    edited 25 June

    rjsterry said:

    Anyone else surprised at the naïve attitude Frost is showing at these hearings?

    Basically all the things people said would likely happen he now says weren't expected and they're 'surprised'

    I am not surprised by him pretending to be surprised.
    It is such red meat for "I told you so" people (of which I am a paid up member).
    Based on the fact that he chose to wear Union Jack socks to the G7 I would assume that he has a lot of surprises in his life
    I can assure you they are fairly regular attire for a certain kind of City duffer.
    and I imagine that they have many surprises in their lives
    What, the fact that the steak tartare is not on the menu today and the 2005 burgundy is not available for the rest of the week?
  • ballysmateballysmate Posts: 15,628

    Never thought I'd see the day Bally and Stevo criticise countries for imposing their will on other countries.

    Thought they were proud of the Empire etc.

    I was pointing out that Germany was using the EU as a vehicle to impose its will.
    Yours is quite a telling comparison. Are you are suggesting the EU is an empire being run by the Germans?

  • tomeagartomeagar Posts: 4
    edited 26 June
    .
  • surrey_commutersurrey_commuter Posts: 14,603

    rjsterry said:

    Anyone else surprised at the naïve attitude Frost is showing at these hearings?

    Basically all the things people said would likely happen he now says weren't expected and they're 'surprised'

    I am not surprised by him pretending to be surprised.
    It is such red meat for "I told you so" people (of which I am a paid up member).
    Based on the fact that he chose to wear Union Jack socks to the G7 I would assume that he has a lot of surprises in his life
    I can assure you they are fairly regular attire for a certain kind of City duffer.
    and I imagine that they have many surprises in their lives
    What, the fact that the steak tartare is not on the menu today and the 2005 burgundy is not available for the rest of the week?
    I was thinking more of turning up to a meeting and finding out some of the chaps are chappeses and the non-white guy is not the waiter
  • Stevo_666Stevo_666 Posts: 46,825

    Never thought I'd see the day Bally and Stevo criticise countries for imposing their will on other countries.

    Thought they were proud of the Empire etc.

    I was pointing out that Germany was using the EU as a vehicle to impose its will.
    Yours is quite a telling comparison. Are you are suggesting the EU is an empire being run by the Germans?

    Don't forget Bally, EU empire = good; British empire = bad.
    "I spent most of my money on birds, booze and fast cars: the rest of it I just squandered." [George Best]
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 20,765
    Stevo_666 said:

    Never thought I'd see the day Bally and Stevo criticise countries for imposing their will on other countries.

    Thought they were proud of the Empire etc.

    I was pointing out that Germany was using the EU as a vehicle to impose its will.
    Yours is quite a telling comparison. Are you are suggesting the EU is an empire being run by the Germans?

    Don't forget Bally, EU empire = good; British empire = bad.
    Good or bad, one of them hasn't existed for quite a while now.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 23,212
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • Stevo_666Stevo_666 Posts: 46,825
    rjsterry said:

    Stevo_666 said:

    Never thought I'd see the day Bally and Stevo criticise countries for imposing their will on other countries.

    Thought they were proud of the Empire etc.

    I was pointing out that Germany was using the EU as a vehicle to impose its will.
    Yours is quite a telling comparison. Are you are suggesting the EU is an empire being run by the Germans?

    Don't forget Bally, EU empire = good; British empire = bad.
    Good or bad, one of them hasn't existed for quite a while now.
    How long do you think the EU empire has existed?
    "I spent most of my money on birds, booze and fast cars: the rest of it I just squandered." [George Best]
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 20,765
    Stevo_666 said:

    rjsterry said:

    Stevo_666 said:

    Never thought I'd see the day Bally and Stevo criticise countries for imposing their will on other countries.

    Thought they were proud of the Empire etc.

    I was pointing out that Germany was using the EU as a vehicle to impose its will.
    Yours is quite a telling comparison. Are you are suggesting the EU is an empire being run by the Germans?

    Don't forget Bally, EU empire = good; British empire = bad.
    Good or bad, one of them hasn't existed for quite a while now.
    How long do you think the EU empire has existed?
    ... and the other one isn't an empire.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 23,212




    #BrexitBenefit
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • Stevo_666Stevo_666 Posts: 46,825
    rjsterry said:

    Stevo_666 said:

    rjsterry said:

    Stevo_666 said:

    Never thought I'd see the day Bally and Stevo criticise countries for imposing their will on other countries.

    Thought they were proud of the Empire etc.

    I was pointing out that Germany was using the EU as a vehicle to impose its will.
    Yours is quite a telling comparison. Are you are suggesting the EU is an empire being run by the Germans?

    Don't forget Bally, EU empire = good; British empire = bad.
    Good or bad, one of them hasn't existed for quite a while now.
    How long do you think the EU empire has existed?
    ... and the other one isn't an empire.
    Correct answer, although it seems to be trying to get there.
    "I spent most of my money on birds, booze and fast cars: the rest of it I just squandered." [George Best]
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 20,765
    Have I missed it invading somewhere?
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • elbowlohelbowloh Posts: 7,078
    I only noticed the other day that all the street signs in our town, reminding people to socially distance (the little yellow ones attached to lamp posts) are not funded by the borough council, nor the county council, nor the UK government, but rather the EU.

    Buggers invading us with their signs!
    Felt F1 2014
    Felt Z6 2012
    Red Arthur Caygill steel frame
    Tall....
    www.seewildlife.co.uk
  • ballysmateballysmate Posts: 15,628
    And the EU is funded how?
  • darkhairedlorddarkhairedlord Posts: 7,094

    And the EU is funded how?

    Plundering its colonies?
  • Stevo_666Stevo_666 Posts: 46,825
    rjsterry said:

    Have I missed it invading somewhere?

    Its more like a business takeover these days :)

    "I spent most of my money on birds, booze and fast cars: the rest of it I just squandered." [George Best]
  • elbowlohelbowloh Posts: 7,078

    And the EU is funded how?

    Through the German manufacturing empire.
    Felt F1 2014
    Felt Z6 2012
    Red Arthur Caygill steel frame
    Tall....
    www.seewildlife.co.uk
  • briantrumpetbriantrumpet Posts: 7,631
    Is the Telegraph's Jeremy Warner actually a leftie Cakestopper?

    So far, the two main economic impacts have been a significant deterioration in trade with Europe, and, thanks to the end of free movement, an acute shortage of labour in some parts of the economy.

    It is admittedly hard to be certain quite how much of these effects can be directly attributable to Brexit. Covid has made precise judgements virtually impossible, with the pandemic quite plainly a much bigger immediate impact on the economy than Brexit. Yet whereas the former will likely prove transitory, the second threatens to be much more enduring.

    When the pandemic hit, international trade was badly affected almost everywhere. But as economies adapt to life under Covid, trade with the rest of the world has been quick to bounce back. That’s not the case with the EU. This fairly convincingly suggests a negative effect from greater, Brexit related, barriers to trade.

    Certainly that’s the anecdotal evidence, particularly from smaller firms, many of whom say it is no longer worth the administrative hassle and costs of selling into the European market. Larger companies will on the whole have developed the systems for coping. But it is a different story among small exporters, previously selling quite marginal amounts of perhaps as little as a couple of boxes of product a month into the European market. Individually, the loss of this business is unlikely to be a life or death issue to the firms involved, but collectively, it all adds up.

    To be drawing comfort from the consequent erosion in volumes on the grounds that the effect is to reorientate Britain’s trade away from Europe to the rest of the world – particularly Asia and the Anglosphere – is almost laughably ridiculous. You would not deliberately swap the larger whole for a greater proportion of a smaller one. The fact is that it is going to require very considerable growth in trade with the rest of the world to fully compensate for the loss of trade with Europe.


    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2021/06/29/project-fear-bad-pr-guff-global-britain-never-ceases-amaze/
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 57,381 Lives Here
  • tailwindhometailwindhome Posts: 16,674
    If I understand it correctly the High Court in Belfast has determined that the Withdrawal Act isn't illegal as it has repealed Article 6 of the Act of Union

    Believe that a farther shore
    Is reachable from here.
    Believe in miracles
    And cures and healing wells
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 57,381 Lives Here

    Is the Telegraph's Jeremy Warner actually a leftie Cakestopper?

    So far, the two main economic impacts have been a significant deterioration in trade with Europe, and, thanks to the end of free movement, an acute shortage of labour in some parts of the economy.

    It is admittedly hard to be certain quite how much of these effects can be directly attributable to Brexit. Covid has made precise judgements virtually impossible, with the pandemic quite plainly a much bigger immediate impact on the economy than Brexit. Yet whereas the former will likely prove transitory, the second threatens to be much more enduring.

    When the pandemic hit, international trade was badly affected almost everywhere. But as economies adapt to life under Covid, trade with the rest of the world has been quick to bounce back. That’s not the case with the EU. This fairly convincingly suggests a negative effect from greater, Brexit related, barriers to trade.

    Certainly that’s the anecdotal evidence, particularly from smaller firms, many of whom say it is no longer worth the administrative hassle and costs of selling into the European market. Larger companies will on the whole have developed the systems for coping. But it is a different story among small exporters, previously selling quite marginal amounts of perhaps as little as a couple of boxes of product a month into the European market. Individually, the loss of this business is unlikely to be a life or death issue to the firms involved, but collectively, it all adds up.

    To be drawing comfort from the consequent erosion in volumes on the grounds that the effect is to reorientate Britain’s trade away from Europe to the rest of the world – particularly Asia and the Anglosphere – is almost laughably ridiculous. You would not deliberately swap the larger whole for a greater proportion of a smaller one. The fact is that it is going to require very considerable growth in trade with the rest of the world to fully compensate for the loss of trade with Europe.


    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2021/06/29/project-fear-bad-pr-guff-global-britain-never-ceases-amaze/
    Would be curious if the people who associate themselves with right-wing politics think this is a left-wing interpretation as to me it seems just factual.
  • TheBigBeanTheBigBean Posts: 14,072

    If I understand it correctly the High Court in Belfast has determined that the Withdrawal Act isn't illegal as it has repealed Article 6 of the Act of Union

    Will it go to the supreme court?
  • darkhairedlorddarkhairedlord Posts: 7,094

    If I understand it correctly the High Court in Belfast has determined that the Withdrawal Act isn't illegal as it has repealed Article 6 of the Act of Union

    Will it go to the supreme court?
    European Court surely, now NI is no longer part of the UK.
  • surrey_commutersurrey_commuter Posts: 14,603

    Is the Telegraph's Jeremy Warner actually a leftie Cakestopper?

    So far, the two main economic impacts have been a significant deterioration in trade with Europe, and, thanks to the end of free movement, an acute shortage of labour in some parts of the economy.

    It is admittedly hard to be certain quite how much of these effects can be directly attributable to Brexit. Covid has made precise judgements virtually impossible, with the pandemic quite plainly a much bigger immediate impact on the economy than Brexit. Yet whereas the former will likely prove transitory, the second threatens to be much more enduring.

    When the pandemic hit, international trade was badly affected almost everywhere. But as economies adapt to life under Covid, trade with the rest of the world has been quick to bounce back. That’s not the case with the EU. This fairly convincingly suggests a negative effect from greater, Brexit related, barriers to trade.

    Certainly that’s the anecdotal evidence, particularly from smaller firms, many of whom say it is no longer worth the administrative hassle and costs of selling into the European market. Larger companies will on the whole have developed the systems for coping. But it is a different story among small exporters, previously selling quite marginal amounts of perhaps as little as a couple of boxes of product a month into the European market. Individually, the loss of this business is unlikely to be a life or death issue to the firms involved, but collectively, it all adds up.

    To be drawing comfort from the consequent erosion in volumes on the grounds that the effect is to reorientate Britain’s trade away from Europe to the rest of the world – particularly Asia and the Anglosphere – is almost laughably ridiculous. You would not deliberately swap the larger whole for a greater proportion of a smaller one. The fact is that it is going to require very considerable growth in trade with the rest of the world to fully compensate for the loss of trade with Europe.


    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2021/06/29/project-fear-bad-pr-guff-global-britain-never-ceases-amaze/
    Would be curious if the people who associate themselves with right-wing politics think this is a left-wing interpretation as to me it seems just factual.
    I have been working on a theory that right and left no longer exists and that political allegiances owe more to age. Try rephrasing your question to reflect the new reality

    Yeo Boomer does this seem like a wokey dokey interpretation as to me it just seems factual.

    Personally it makes me want to cry that this chap has just figured out the bloody obvious after 5 long years and thinks it is disappointing enough to write about
  • tailwindhometailwindhome Posts: 16,674

    If I understand it correctly the High Court in Belfast has determined that the Withdrawal Act isn't illegal as it has repealed Article 6 of the Act of Union

    Will it go to the supreme court?

    If I understand it correctly the High Court in Belfast has determined that the Withdrawal Act isn't illegal as it has repealed Article 6 of the Act of Union

    Will it go to the supreme court?
    Seems so

    I think Appeal Court then Supreme
    Believe that a farther shore
    Is reachable from here.
    Believe in miracles
    And cures and healing wells
  • tailwindhometailwindhome Posts: 16,674
    edited 30 June
    Twitter thread on the judges ruling


    I particularly enjoyed the judges observation that one of the applicants had voted for the Withdrawal Agreement he now argued was illegal

    Believe that a farther shore
    Is reachable from here.
    Believe in miracles
    And cures and healing wells
  • TheBigBeanTheBigBean Posts: 14,072
    I was one of the few people who thought the protocol was a good idea and a sensible compromise, but it doesn't feel like it is going that well.

  • ddraverddraver Posts: 23,212
    For the most part, it is

    I've left TSS now so there will be no more stories from the coalface but, actually, it's all working ok now. People have decided if it's worth it or not, taken the hit if necessary or re-orientated if not. It's a time-consuming faff, but once you've done a couple, you'll have it down. Freight Forwarders have gladly charged large amounts of money to people who didn't want to do it themselves. In what must be a rare occurrence, the software has actually been designed and works really rather well.

    The problems exist in Stormont/Westminster and a lot of that is to do with the inability for this UK government and the DUP to point out what an advantageous position NI could be in being in both the UK and Single Market (in contrast to Gibraltar, for example)

    For the record, N.I is not short of locally made sausages. In fact, I heard quite the opposite.
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • darkhairedlorddarkhairedlord Posts: 7,094

    I was one of the few people who thought the protocol was a good idea and a sensible compromise, but it doesn't feel like it is going that well.

    Well done, that's the first step.
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