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Train for 100 miles in 15 weeks?

davidmt83davidmt83 Posts: 218
Hi,

I've been off the bike for 4 months now but I've signed up for a 100 mile charity ride in June and wondered what the most sensible way to train for this was.

Bit of history: I'm 31, used to ride 40 miles previously at the weekends, the most I've ridden was 50 miles around the Peak District.

Realistically I'll get out one night in the week, maybe two, and one day at the weekend and I'm lead to believe if you can do 70 / 80 miles regularly you should be okay with 100 miles on the day.

Does the following sound a sensible way to achieve this? I'm starting off quite slow to build some initial fitness.

The weekday ride is a lot less due to time constraints but as I say I'll try and get out twice when I can.

Week Weekend Weekday
1 10 10
2 15 15
3 20 20
4 25 20
5 30 20
6 35 20
7 40 20
8 40 20
9 50 20
10 50 20
11 60 20
12 60 20
13 70 20
14 70 20
15 80 20

Thanks
Cannondale Synapse 105 Disc

Posts

  • That seems reasonable to me. Would be even better if you could squeeze in one more ride a week especially as you get towards the end.
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • bahzobbahzob Posts: 2,195
    Yes that looks fine. Riding 100 miles is actually a lot less daunting than it may sound.

    Apart from anything else most charity rides involve riding in groups and this makes things much easer. Riding this way is around 30-50% easier than riding solo, so if you can do 70 miles solo, 100 miles with others should be easy.

    If you are not already used to riding in company then I'd suggest practising a bit. Most cycle clubs do runs over the weekend where you could do this.

    All the above being said, if you want to get fitter more quickly, you need to do some higher intensity work. You can fit this into your rides, just start off by doing 5 minutes or so as hard as possible a couple of times during them (hills are good for this). As you get fitter increase the length and/or number of these efforts.

    Good luck
    Martin S. Newbury RC
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    I think just about anyone could do 10 miles on a bike - you really don't need to start that low.

    We have a charity bike ride round here - 50 miles or so and real beginners complete that. On bikes with flat tyres and saddles too low.

    I think pacing is the key on the big ride - take it steady and refuel as you go.
  • Depends on the elevation really. I'd say that if you can do 100km on a regular basis, non-stop and still get off the bike at the end and not feel completely tired then you'll be fine over 100 miles. Although doing longer rides in the run up won't hurt at all.

    The key things are pacing, don't push yourself to stay with a group if they are going above your comfortable pace. And fuelling, make sure you take on food regularly, even if it's outside the normal feed stops.
  • everything I have read suggests doing the 80 miler 2 weeks sooner... then tail off after that. As suggested above you could start on higher mileage ie 20 20 and shift training schedule up 2 weeks. I would also up the 20 mil rides to 30.
  • bahzobbahzob Posts: 2,195
    everything I have read suggests doing the 80 miler 2 weeks sooner... then tail off after that. ...

    Yes this is true. It's especially so if you are aiming at a "racing" type of event where you don't just want to finish but finish as fast as you can.

    Training works because it puts the body under stress and the body reacts by making itself stronger. However when done over weeks/months this builds up a background level of fatigue. This will compromise your performance if you carry into an event.

    So 1-2 weeks before an event its good practice to "taper". This means you ease up a bit on training while doing just enough to retain the fitness you have built up. The usual mantra for this is "reduce duration, maintain intensity". So just doing short training sessions at around "race " pace with plenty of R&R in between.
    Martin S. Newbury RC
  • norvernrobnorvernrob Posts: 1,437
    You'll be fine. I did my first 100 miler about 14 weeks after I first got on a road bike after not cycling at all for 15 years. I was doing around 80-100 miles per week average, two short 20 mile rides midweek ridden as hard as I could, then 40-60 miles in the peaks on a Sunday. My longest ride was 75 miles, but I paced the 100 so well I ended up doing it at 17mph average.

    Just get out as much as you can and ride hard, then take it easier on the day you do the 100. Whatever you have left in the tank after 70-80 miles just empty it to the finish.
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