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how much to a get a rear wheel re-dished?

luv2rideluv2ride Posts: 2,362
edited March 2014 in Workshop
I think my rear Pro-lite Bracciano wheel is out of dish, so want to get it repaired by a specialist (not confident in doing it myself really). Here are the symptoms:
Rear wheel naturally wants to sit closer to the driveside chainstay. After posting about this issue a while ago, I finally got around to actioning some of the helpful suggestions I received from forum members. So I broke the chain, removed the rear derailleur, took off the mech hanger, and re-inserted the wheel 'back to front' (I.e. with the cassette on the non-drive side) and noted that the wheel then naturally sat centrally between the chainstays. I've re-assembled using a spare mech hanger I'd bought (to rule out a misaligned hanger) and with the derailleur re-fitted (and the wheel back in the "right" way around) the wheel still wants to sit closer to the chainstay.

Therefore a trip to a good bike shop seems to be in order. Before I starting phoning around the limited choices around where I live, I'd be grateful for ideas/experiences on how much I'd be likely to be charged for this job. I guess a cost for checking the dish, and another for re-dishing as required, just so I know I'm being quoted realistic prices

many thanks
Scott Solace 10 disc - Kinesis Crosslight Pro6 disc - Scott CR1 SL - Pinnacle Arkose X 650b - Pinnacle Arkose 1x11 "monster cross" - Specialized Singlecross...& an Ernie Ball Musicman Stingray 4 string...

Posts

  • SmithsterSmithster Posts: 117
    My LBS charge anywhere between £10-£20 dependant, on how much the wheel is out by I guess, and how much faffing is required. Don't know if that is expensive, seemed reasonable to me?

    Cheers

    Andy
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 25,696
    The Bracciano is a rather standard wheel, you should be charged 10 pounds or so. However... I think it uses alloy nipples to memory, which might turn out to be seized... that would come a lot more expensive or turn out in a total disaster
  • JayKostaJayKosta Posts: 635
    Try looking to see how the wheel is aligned relative to the seat tube itself - not the chain stays.
    The 'dish' of the wheel should position it in line with the 'front triangle' of the frame - the precise alignment with the stays is less important (unless there is rubbing, or a functional problem).

    Do you notice any actual problems with the bike?
    How difficult to ride 'no hands' in a straight line?

    Jay Kosta
    Endwell NY USA
  • luv2rideluv2ride Posts: 2,362
    I've never been great a riding with no hands, but haven't noticed a functional issue with the bike as such, rather just not happy that it's not right. Had the same wheels as an upgrade on an alu Boardman bike and I'm sure I had the same alignment issue. Was thinking on getting some Zondas today, but thought I'd be better trying to get the rear fixed first (and saving 250 quid).

    Is it the kind of job that any decent lbs should be able to do? For 10-20 quid it sounds like its worth a punt at least, and get the Zondas if the wheel repair isn't so straight forward...
    Scott Solace 10 disc - Kinesis Crosslight Pro6 disc - Scott CR1 SL - Pinnacle Arkose X 650b - Pinnacle Arkose 1x11 "monster cross" - Specialized Singlecross...& an Ernie Ball Musicman Stingray 4 string...
  • dennisndennisn Posts: 10,496
    luv2ride wrote:
    I think my rear Pro-lite Bracciano wheel is out of dish, so want to get it repaired by a specialist (not confident in doing it myself really). Here are the symptoms:
    Rear wheel naturally wants to sit closer to the driveside chainstay. After posting about this issue a while ago, I finally got around to actioning some of the helpful suggestions I received from forum members. So I broke the chain, removed the rear derailleur, took off the mech hanger, and re-inserted the wheel 'back to front' (I.e. with the cassette on the non-drive side) and noted that the wheel then naturally sat centrally between the chainstays. I've re-assembled using a spare mech hanger I'd bought (to rule out a misaligned hanger) and with the derailleur re-fitted (and the wheel back in the "right" way around) the wheel still wants to sit closer to the chainstay.

    Therefore a trip to a good bike shop seems to be in order. Before I starting phoning around the limited choices around where I live, I'd be grateful for ideas/experiences on how much I'd be likely to be charged for this job. I guess a cost for checking the dish, and another for re-dishing as required, just so I know I'm being quoted realistic prices

    many thanks

    Do you have any friends or acquaintances who have a dishing tool? This will tell you for sure or not whether it needs dishing. I wouldn't just walk into a shop and say that you think it needs dishing. Have the shop show you that it's not dished properly.
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