Spend £2. Your life is worth it.

cmhill79
cmhill79 Posts: 138
edited February 2014 in Road general
To all those cyclists out there riding with poorly illuminated lights (usually rear) in low visibility conditions for goodness sake spend £2 on a new battery. Your life is worth it.

Comments

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    Good reminder ;-)
    You see so many people with dim rubbish lights.

    USB is the way to go. Mine tells you if it needs charging when you turn it off, so just pop straight on charge and its ready for next trip.
  • chris_bass
    chris_bass Posts: 4,913
    i use rechargeables and give them a charge each weekend.

    I think the pound shop lights and things like that are actually more trouble than they are worth, people buy them stick them on the back of their bike and have no idea how bad they are and assume they can be seen.

    having said that, the amount of people i see cycling on completely unlit roads without any front lights is incredible, how do they even see where they are going? i'm actually quite impressed!
    www.conjunctivitis.com - a site for sore eyes
  • I always have 3 rear lights on my bike at any one time, at a minimum. 2 usb rechargables and a fibre flare, always have 2 spare batteries in my seatbag too.

    I always keep on top of my light charging. Have 2 front lights, one main light up the road, a lesser one aimed at the road and a small flare on my fork to be seen. It baffles me that some people don't seem to do much to be seen. It's not exactly difficult and could keep them alive
  • I suspect you're preaching to the choir here. The people I see with poor quality lights are not bike fanatics who hang out at places like this. The sentiment of your message is quite correct, though.
  • I agree with Chris here about the people without front lights. I struggle to see even with a large light, by this I mean that I don't see as well as I would be comfortable with. I can't believe people make it without a light.

    Most people just let bike lights become a figment of their memory and never remember they need to replace batteries.
  • Front cateye to light up the road, rear cateye on the seat post, more than enough to be seen.

    Flashing on overcast/low light days/evening constant at night.

    The amount of times I've been driving or even riding behind someone lit up like a Christmas tree is more distracting than anything, I wouldn't drive at night flashing my lights and so I wouldn't do so whilst riding.
  • Found this while searching for an image of my rear light...
    10848927946_5d34bee809_b.jpg

    My rear light is Mylane. It's really cool.
    http://youtu.be/uRnH1T_sZlY

    article-0-18D49A3B000005DC-537_634x421.jpg
    Ride Safe! Keep Safe!
    Specialized Roubaix Comp 2017
    Cube Agree Pro 2014
    Triban 7 2013
    RockRider 8.0 2011
    http://www.whitestar1.co.uk
  • Nice. It causes drivers to do that? Driver passes me that close then I'm smashing his windows. And this is a bike safety product? Insane.
  • moon shield on strobe :twisted:
  • jds_1981
    jds_1981 Posts: 1,858
    In London at least, I really don't have problems spotting unlit cars and bikes. Time I went over a car bonnet at 25mph they didn't spot my two bright front lights. That's why I now run a magicshine front when commuting.
    FCN 9 || FCN 5
  • slowbike
    slowbike Posts: 8,498
    Chris Bass wrote:
    having said that, the amount of people i see cycling on completely unlit roads without any front lights is incredible, how do they even see where they are going? i'm actually quite impressed!

    Have you tried it?

    I did last year when I started winter commuting with 1 Cateye Nanoshot + and a small cateye "seeme" light - I tried it for a short period when there were no cars around (about 1/3rd of my commute) just to see what it would be like if my big Cateye failed.

    Initially you can't see much, but eyes adjust to the lack of light and most of the time you can see where you're going - when this fails is when you get a car coming past (eitherway) - lighting up the road as it then destroys your night vision - best way to combat that is to close one eye during the pass ...

    Actually - scrap that - the BEST way is to have proper lights ... the second best way is to preserve your night vision :)
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    I avoid having mad flashing lights as I think this just annoys and distracts people.
    I do often have rear one on strobe and front one on alternate flash (it has two lights which alternate at moderate speed) as I feel its more noticeable without being too annoying.

    Some rear lights seem to have 'epilepsy' flash mode these days :shock:
  • Carbonator wrote:

    Some rear lights seem to have 'epilepsy' flash mode these days :shock:

    I do wonder how long it will be until someone gets sued because of an epileptic having a fit due to a rear bike light flashing. :lol:
  • ai_1
    ai_1 Posts: 3,060
    A rear flasher works well to get the attention of other road users but once you've been noticed a constant light is easier to keep an eye on and judge distance, speed, etc. I think 2 or more rear lights is a good idea to have some redundancy but only one needs to be a flasher.
    In urban areas you can get away with a low power flasher at the front but I think you're better off with a good bright front light that can compete with other road traffic (without blinding them). Then there's no need for a front flasher. I don't think there's any reason for high power front lights to have a flashing mode. It's incredibly irritating for other road users and is completely unnecessary. You're already clearly visible. If you want to signal that you're a cyclist just add a secondary lower powered flasher.
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 40,572
    Nice. It causes drivers to do that? Driver passes me that close then I'm smashing his windows. And this is a bike safety product? Insane.

    Not to mention the car also seems to be indicating a left turn as it scrapes past the bike :shock:
  • slowbike
    slowbike Posts: 8,498
    Ai_1 wrote:
    A rear flasher works well to get the attention of other road users but once you've been noticed a constant light is easier to keep an eye on and judge distance, speed, etc. I think 2 or more rear lights is a good idea to have some redundancy but only one needs to be a flasher.
    If it's going to be dark then yes - 2+ rear lights with one on constant - during the darker rides - usually when it's wet - I used 3 rear lights - 2 flashing and one on constant. Because they're behind me and on the back of a rack I can't easily see if they're working - hence the multi-redundancy.
    Ai_1 wrote:
    In urban areas you can get away with a low power flasher at the front but I think you're better off with a good bright front light that can compete with other road traffic (without blinding them). Then there's no need for a front flasher. I don't think there's any reason for high power front lights to have a flashing mode. It's incredibly irritating for other road users and is completely unnecessary. You're already clearly visible. If you want to signal that you're a cyclist just add a secondary lower powered flasher.

    Hmm - not sure a low power flasher is much good tbh. I quite like my Cateye Nanoshot+ "hyperconstant" mode - it stays on 1/2 power constant and flashes bright about once per second (or slightly quicker) - I feel this helps me stand out against a background of lights - mostly other vehicles ... a dim flasher would just be lost in the mix.
    That hyperconstant mode is only used when I'm either in town and it's dark & wet (not often) or I'm approaching a junction that I know cars risk pulling out of and could easily miss the fact that there is a cyclist there.
  • plowmar
    plowmar Posts: 1,032
    Going back to OP, I've just bought a rear USB light only to find that the max charge time is 7.5 hours on daylight flash, other settings are less than half that - manufacturers figures. Whereas the previous battery ones have lasted up to 12 months.

    Still to work out which is less hassle.

    One thing that I don't understand is why people on bikes with helmet, hi-viz and lights ride on pavements?
  • Initialised
    Initialised Posts: 3,047
    whitestar1 wrote:
    My rear light is Mylane. It's really cool.
    http://youtu.be/uRnH1T_sZlY

    article-0-18D49A3B000005DC-537_634x421.jpg

    Shame it doesn't stop dangerously close passes!
    I used to just ride my bike to work but now I find myself going out looking for bigger and bigger hills.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    plowmar wrote:
    Going back to OP, I've just bought a rear USB light only to find that the max charge time is 7.5 hours on daylight flash, other settings are less than half that - manufacturers figures. Whereas the previous battery ones have lasted up to 12 months.

    Still to work out which is less hassle.

    One thing that I don't understand is why people on bikes with helmet, hi-viz and lights ride on pavements?

    I would imagine that the USB one is brighter so its not really like for like.
    If its not brighter (or better in some other way) then its not worth having over the battery one unless you leave changing the batteries a day late.

    Batteries seem a hassle to me if you have to change regularly. Rechargeable ones (AA's etc.) are even more hassle.
    Lights you can put rechargeable batteries in are probably bigger, heavier and less 'shapely' than USB ones too.

    Guessing the people riding on pavements also ride on the road for part of their journey?
    My commute can be done 100% on cycle path or 100% on the road.
    I use all combinations depending on time of day, weather and traffic conditions etc. but will always leave home assuming I will use the road (which I prefer).
  • plowmar
    plowmar Posts: 1,032
    Battery ones I have are knog skink and they are quite streamlined with reflections from street furniture at least 40 yards away, but as the rear one has twice failed due to water ingress I bought a cheap usb rechargeable with the aforementioned times. (For some reason the 20 lumen daylight setting lasts longer than the 10 lumen setting of the other options.)

    As you can guess my lights are to be seen by not to see with.
  • ive got a knob and its awesome :)
    USB charger lights are the way to go.
    London2Brighton Challange 100k!
    http://www.justgiving.com/broxbourne-runners
  • Giraffoto
    Giraffoto Posts: 2,078
    I used to carry a couple of spare batteries in my pocket in a sweet little plastic battery box (to stop them rattling around) before I realized that a couple of spare batteries in a spare light in my pocket only weighs a couple of grams more, and is significantly easier to swap around. And still doesn't rattle around
    Specialized Roubaix Elite 2015
    XM-057 rigid 29er
  • ai_1
    ai_1 Posts: 3,060
    ive got a knob and its awesome :)
    I'm sure we're all very happy for you :wink:
  • Driving home last night, I'm close to home when I see two cyclists ahead of me. Cyclist 1 has a bright flashing light you can see for miles, no missing him at all! Cyclist 2 appears to have no lights at all, I saw him because of the street lighting and that he was going in and out in front of the red light of the other cyclist.

    But as I pulled up behind him on the roundabout I noticed he did have a rear light, extremely faint and you could only see it was there if you were right behind it and looking carefully -- he probably thought it was all fine and he had an adequate light.
  • moon shield on strobe :twisted:


    +1 A truly awesome rear light. The best I`ve used bar none.
  • I highly recommend Lithium batteries for rear lights especially. I have a rechargable front light, and as these need to be quite powerful for unlit roads then buying new batteries every week over the winter isn't really an option, I will stick to the USB type for the front.

    But for the rear, I have a Cateye: http://www.evanscycles.com/products/cat ... t-ec007955

    For the past couple of winters, I have put a new set of Lithium batteries into this light and have not had to change them all winter, and thats commuting about twice a week, about three hours per days commute, and for all other times when the daylight has faded on weekend rides as well.