Saddle to bar drop, what is that?

antonio95
antonio95 Posts: 25
edited February 2014 in Road general
Hey there, I've been having some back pain and neck pain on long road rides, so I read that this could be because the of the saddle-to-bar drop, but here's the thing, which is exactly that measure?

Comments

  • Jon_1976
    Jon_1976 Posts: 690
    http://www.chainreaction.com/saddles.htm

    scroll down a bit, pic there
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    edited February 2014
    Could equally be reach if the bike is too big/overly long stem though couldn't it?
    I would look at that first before flipping the stem.

    If you do flip the stem I would drop it down the steerer (assuming it is at the top of the steerer now, if not then just put at the top of the steer without flipping) a bit so that it is only slightly higher than at present, and see how that feels.
  • DiscoBoy
    DiscoBoy Posts: 905
    The vertical distance between your saddle and your handlebars.

    You can alter it by fitting a steeper stem, or moving your bars up the steerer tube (if you currently have spacers above it).

    But it really would be a good idea to learn a bit more about bike fit than it would seem that you currently do before making any changes. Or getting a professional/ experienced friend to help you.
    Red bikes are the fastest.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    I doubt he needs a steeper stem.
    A steeper stem will make the bars lower unless it is already flipped and would look like cow horns if he then put the steeper one on flipped.
  • DiscoBoy
    DiscoBoy Posts: 905
    Carbonator wrote:
    I doubt he needs a steeper stem.
    A steeper stem will make the bars lower unless it is already flipped and would look like cow horns if he then put the steeper one on flipped.

    I doubt that he'd put it pointing downwards if he wanted to raise the bars :roll:
    Red bikes are the fastest.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    Of course he would not put it downwards, but why do you think he needs a steeper stem at all? :roll: x2
  • DiscoBoy
    DiscoBoy Posts: 905
    Carbonator wrote:
    Of course he would not put it downwards, but why do you think he needs a steeper stem at all? :roll: x2

    At no point did I say that he needs a steeper stem, nor did I think that.
    Red bikes are the fastest.
  • hstiles
    hstiles Posts: 414
    There could be a number of reasons for back and neck pain.

    Seat post with too much offset
    stem too long, bars too low
    too narrow or too wide
    Saddle not comfortable
    poor core muscle strength.

    Start with a bike fit or, if you have access to a turbo trainer and a helpful friend, get them to look at your position on the bike or even film you whilst pedalling.
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 40,441
    Carbonator wrote:
    I doubt he needs a steeper stem.
    A steeper stem will make the bars lower unless it is already flipped and would look like cow horns if he then put the steeper one on flipped.

    A steeper stem (flipped) would act to decrease the saddle to bar drop over a less steep one surely? If the bars are at the limit of the steerer then short of fitting new forks there isn't really much else that can be done to reduce the drop. It all depends on what the current set up is like.

    All of this of course assumes that the saddle to bar drop is indeed the cause of back trouble. If the rider is new to riding it could simply be that his muscles need to get used to the position.
  • kajjal
    kajjal Posts: 3,380
    Flipping the stem to the upright position reduces reach and reduces drop from the saddle. How much drop does the OP have and how tall are they ?

    While some road bikers are obsessed with getting the riding position as low as possible most just want to be comfortable and often ride with little drop. The drop on my bike is about 1" as coming from mountain biking I prefer a more upright position. Some prefer no drop and other considerably more drop. It is down to body proportions / size and personnal preference.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    DiscoBoy wrote:
    Carbonator wrote:
    Of course he would not put it downwards, but why do you think he needs a steeper stem at all? :roll: x2

    At no point did I say that he needs a steeper stem, nor did I think that.

    Well you should guard your password better then because someone logged into your account and wrote this.....


    Re: Saddle to bar drop, what is that?
    Post by DiscoBoy » Wed Feb 05, 2014 9:39 pm

    The vertical distance between your saddle and your handlebars.

    You can alter it by fitting a steeper stem, or moving your bars up the steerer tube (if you currently have spacers above it).

    But it really would be a good idea to learn a bit more about bike fit than it would seem that you currently do before making any changes. Or getting a professional/ experienced friend to help you.
  • smidsy
    smidsy Posts: 5,273
    I think the crucial word there is 'can' - he never stated it was needed, simply stated options. This in itself is not to say he thought he needed it or that he should do it.
    Yellow is the new Black.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    Sorry smidsy but if you reply to a thread asking for advice and say you can do this or can do that, the things you are saying can be done are your recommendations as to what possibly should be done.

    My point was that there is no point/need to buy a steeper stem without seeing if the current one could be flipped first.
    The current stem is probably facing down and at the top of the steerer so buying a steeper one will mean it will have to be flipped and therefore raise bars by a massive amount compared to current position.

    If the OP bought a steeper stem I am guessing he would either try to fit the same as the existing (which is probably facing down) or then realise it needs to be flipped, and then realise he could have just flipped the original one.
    You would also need to decide upon length before buying a new stem.

    Was meant to be a bit of a joke comment about the steeper stem making the bars lower anyway, and DiscoBoy gave the best advice in saying to get a friend or professional to help.