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What do Sky do that makes them so strong? non-doping thread

whiteboytrashwhiteboytrash Posts: 594
edited January 2014 in Pro race
Let's turn around the discussion in to something more positive.

We hear of marginal gains etc. and training at altitude etc.

I understand that some here have links to BC so maybe some insider input.

So I'd like to understand without talking about doping etc. why Sky are so strong over other teams in 1 week to GT styled races.

In terms of doping I'd prefer not to discuss but I hear that Sky have a "strict anti-doping policy" - what is this policy and what is is contents?

I look forward to leaning how they train differently than other teams etc. or details on what makes them a big success.

What is the secret behind their successes?
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Posts

  • No_Ta_DoctorNo_Ta_Doctor Posts: 10,234
    1) Money. They pay very good wages to very good riders, chosen to be workhorses for the team. BMC may lay out more, but not on their domestiques.
    “Road racing was over and the UCI had banned my riding positions on the track, so it was like ‘Jings, crivvens, help ma Boab, what do I do now? I know, I’ll go away and be depressed for 10 years’.”

    @DrHeadgear

    The Vikings are coming!
  • joelsimjoelsim Posts: 7,552
    1. Budget
    2. Methods
    3. Pillows
    4. DB
    5. Helicopters
    6. Power meters
    7. Bodysuits
    8. Washing machines on the bus

    QED.
  • tailwindhometailwindhome Posts: 16,146
    Timing
    Believe that a farther shore
    Is reachable from here.
    Believe in miracles
    And cures and healing wells
  • whiteboytrashwhiteboytrash Posts: 594
    edited January 2014
    Joelsim wrote:
    1. Budget
    2. Methods
    3. Pillows
    4. DB
    5. Helicopters
    6. Power meters
    7. Bodysuits
    8. Washing machines on the bus

    QED.

    I've heard about the pillows. Sky use Technogel. They were actually used by Cofidis and Liquigas before Sky.
    Technogel from Italy are one of these companies. The Cofidis and Liquigas teams use their pillows, but they also have a deeper link with cycling. If the name sounds familiar, it’s because Fi'zi:k use Technogel materials in their saddles and for parts like aero bar elbow pads. In fact, Technogel are an offshoot of Fi'zi:k’s parent company Selle Royal, one of Europe’s biggest saddle makers. The eponymous shape-memory polyurethane gel was developed with German plastics giants Bayer Material Science and is used in Fi'zi:k’s Arione K1 saddle, among others.

    Can you elaborate on "Methods" ? and "power meters"?
  • Mad_MalxMad_Malx Posts: 4,193
    Here we go....
  • No_Ta_DoctorNo_Ta_Doctor Posts: 10,234
    Joelsim wrote:
    1. Budget
    2. Methods
    3. Pillows
    4. DB
    5. Helicopters
    6. Power meters
    7. Bodysuits
    8. Washing machines on the bus

    QED.

    I've heard about the pillows. Sky use Tecnogel. They were actually used by Cofidis and Liquigas before Sky.
    Technogel from Italy are one of these companies. The Cofidis and Liquigas teams use their pillows, but they also have a deeper link with cycling. If the name sounds familiar, it’s because Fi'zi:k use Technogel materials in their saddles and for parts like aero bar elbow pads. In fact, Technogel are an offshoot of Fi'zi:k’s parent company Selle Royal, one of Europe’s biggest saddle makers. The eponymous shape-memory polyurethane gel was developed with German plastics giants Bayer Material Science and is used in Fi'zi:k’s Arione K1 saddle, among others.

    Can you elaborate on "Methods" ? and "power meters"?

    Are you suggesting that whatever Sky do it must be unique? That seems to be the very clear insinuation.

    Besides which, joelsim was taking the piss.
    “Road racing was over and the UCI had banned my riding positions on the track, so it was like ‘Jings, crivvens, help ma Boab, what do I do now? I know, I’ll go away and be depressed for 10 years’.”

    @DrHeadgear

    The Vikings are coming!
  • Joelsim wrote:
    1. Budget
    2. Methods
    3. Pillows
    4. DB
    5. Helicopters
    6. Power meters
    7. Bodysuits
    8. Washing machines on the bus

    QED.

    I've heard about the pillows. Sky use Tecnogel. They were actually used by Cofidis and Liquigas before Sky.
    Technogel from Italy are one of these companies. The Cofidis and Liquigas teams use their pillows, but they also have a deeper link with cycling. If the name sounds familiar, it’s because Fi'zi:k use Technogel materials in their saddles and for parts like aero bar elbow pads. In fact, Technogel are an offshoot of Fi'zi:k’s parent company Selle Royal, one of Europe’s biggest saddle makers. The eponymous shape-memory polyurethane gel was developed with German plastics giants Bayer Material Science and is used in Fi'zi:k’s Arione K1 saddle, among others.

    Can you elaborate on "Methods" ? and "power meters"?

    Are you suggesting that whatever Sky do it must be unique? That seems to be the very clear insinuation.

    Besides which, joelsim was taking the wee-wee.

    I'd just like to know without talking about doping.

    What makes them tick and so strong? Perhaps all teams do the same but they just do it better?

    But what is that better? I'd like to learn and understand.
  • RichN95.RichN95. Posts: 24,604
    edited January 2014
    Basically: Recruitment and Training

    Here are the steps

    1. Make sure the team leader is a top notch time triallist. No-one can help him in the TT. Wiggins, Froome & Porte are arguably the best three time triallists of GC riders.

    2. Pay goods wages to stock pile a certain type of rider: those that have been top 20 in a Grand Tour, but never close to the top 5, and climb at a steady pace. Rogers, Kiryienka, Siutsou, Cataldo, Lopez, Zandio, Nieve, Deignan, Knees. And that's before we mention Henao & Uran or Thomas & Kennaugh.

    3. Have a deep squad so riders aren't overworked.

    4. Constantly monitor and adjust training on a day-to-day basis using data and coaches who know what to do with it.

    5. Run training camps where specific race scenarios suited to the team leader are practised.

    6. Use the stockpile of climbers to control the race and bring about the scenario they have trained for so they can execute their drills. Be used to controlling and do it so frequently that other teams become conditioned to not just let you do it but expect you to do it.


    This only works for stage races with significant time trialling, but that's really all they are the best at. They're fairly average at most other things.
    Twitter: @RichN95
  • No_Ta_DoctorNo_Ta_Doctor Posts: 10,234
    What makes them tick and so strong? Perhaps all teams do the same but they just do it better?

    But what is that better? I'd like to learn and understand.

    Pardon me if I doubt your sincerity. We only reached two responses to your original question and you were already pointing out the non-unique nature of one of the (facetious) suggestions, as if anyone actually thought that choice of pillow was the decisive factor in winning two Tour de Frances.

    There is absolutely no way that you haven't been through all the commonly stated reasons already, and found your own counter-argument for each of them. I've already seen you doing it on other threads.

    You know full well that any truly revolutionary training plan is going to be a trade secret, and not leaked on public forum.

    You didn't post your question because you wish to be educated, you posted it because you wished to "educate" others. You opened this thread with the express purpose of disabusing the poor deluded Sky fanboy fools of their received wisdom, or at least kicking off another huge scrap if that didn't work.
    “Road racing was over and the UCI had banned my riding positions on the track, so it was like ‘Jings, crivvens, help ma Boab, what do I do now? I know, I’ll go away and be depressed for 10 years’.”

    @DrHeadgear

    The Vikings are coming!
  • napoleondnapoleond Posts: 5,983
    They aren't.
    Twitter - @NapD
    Strava - Alex Taylor (sportstest.co.uk)
    ABCC Cycling Coach
  • izzaizza Posts: 1,561
    Currently reading Wiggo's autobiagraphy. Methods raised there are:

    - train specifically and don't rely on races to help training
    - train as a team all year rather than squad rotation coming together for the big Tour
    - All riders in the Tour team train together
    - Play to strengths; e.g. Wiggo is good TT rider so TT up mountains rather than wait and react to Contador's bursts.
  • MacaloonMacaloon Posts: 5,545
    RichN95 wrote:
    6. Use the stockpile of climbers to control the race and bring about the scenario they have trained for so they can execute their drills. Be used to controlling and do it so frequently that other teams become conditioned to not just let you do it but expect you to do it.

    They should have taken some of those guys to the Tour :wink:

    Also, take Froome out of Sky and they don't look so strong.
    ...a rare 100% loyal Pro Race poster. A poster boy for the community.
  • MartinGTMartinGT Posts: 475
    They cool down, totally a new approach.

    So new, my games teacher was ahead of his time 17 years ago
  • No_Ta_DoctorNo_Ta_Doctor Posts: 10,234
    Macaloon wrote:
    Also, take Froome out of Sky and they don't look so strong.

    They'd still have the classics season.




    Oh.
    “Road racing was over and the UCI had banned my riding positions on the track, so it was like ‘Jings, crivvens, help ma Boab, what do I do now? I know, I’ll go away and be depressed for 10 years’.”

    @DrHeadgear

    The Vikings are coming!
  • izza wrote:
    Currently reading Wiggo's autobiagraphy. Methods raised there are:

    - train specifically and don't rely on races to help training
    - train as a team all year rather than squad rotation coming together for the big Tour
    - All riders in the Tour team train together
    - Play to strengths; e.g. Wiggo is good TT rider so TT up mountains rather than wait and react to Contador's bursts.

    I agree. The train together is a big one. Cycling teams aren't like football. Football teams spend an entire year together - training and playing.

    Years gone by in cycling they'd be a training camp in January and then riders may cross paths during the year then meet up 3 days before the Tour! I don't disagree what Sky did in 2012. Having a core group based in Spain all year helped. A lot. Each rider knew what they had to do individually.

    Per final point Contador wasn't at the 2012 Tour but I still get the point you make.

    Cannodale have a very good team unity also. Since around 2010.
  • No_Ta_DoctorNo_Ta_Doctor Posts: 10,234
    MartinGT wrote:
    They cool down, totally a new approach.

    So new, my games teacher was ahead of his time 17 years ago

    If your games teacher had been putting riders on rollers before and after a stage, then yes, he would have been.
    “Road racing was over and the UCI had banned my riding positions on the track, so it was like ‘Jings, crivvens, help ma Boab, what do I do now? I know, I’ll go away and be depressed for 10 years’.”

    @DrHeadgear

    The Vikings are coming!
  • MartinGTMartinGT Posts: 475
    RichN95 wrote:
    Basically: Recruitment and Training

    Here are the steps

    1. Make sure the team leader is a top notch time triallist. No-one can help him in the TT. Wiggins, Froome & Porte are arguably the best three time triallists of GC riders.

    2. Pay goods wages to stock pile a certain type of rider: those that have been top 20 in a Grand Tour, but never close to the top 5, and climb at a steady pace. Rogers, Kiryienka, Siutsou, Cataldo, Lopez, Zandio, Nieve, Deignan, Knees. And that's before we mention Henao & Uran or Thomas & Kennaugh.

    3. Have a deep squad so riders aren't overworked.

    4. Constantly monitor and adjust training on a day-to-day basis using data and coaches who know what to do with it.

    5. Run training camps where specific race scenarios suited to the team leader are practised.

    6. Use the stockpile of climbers to control the race and bring about the scenario they have trained for so they can execute their drills. Be used to controlling and do it so frequently that other teams become conditioned to not just let you do it but expect you to do it.


    This only works for stage races with significant time trialling, but that's really all they are the best at. They're fairly average at most other things.

    Except for Dr's or back room staff eh ;)
  • RichN95.RichN95. Posts: 24,604
    Macaloon wrote:
    Also, take Froome out of Sky and they don't look so strong.
    It's the same for most teams (Sky were actually slightly less than averagely reliant on their top rider in 2013):

    wgee.png
    Twitter: @RichN95
  • MartinGTMartinGT Posts: 475
    RichN95 wrote:
    Macaloon wrote:
    Also, take Froome out of Sky and they don't look so strong.
    It's the same for most teams (Sky were actually slightly less than averagely reliant on their top rider in 2013):

    wgee.png

    Porte had a very good season last year early on.

    Thats pretty scary reading for Cannondale!
  • RichN95.RichN95. Posts: 24,604
    MartinGT wrote:
    Except for Dr's or back room staff eh ;)
    Is that all you are capable of contributing?
    Twitter: @RichN95
  • LutherBLutherB Posts: 544
    The secret of their successes, young Grasshopper, is this:

    "There is no one at Sky who knows much about bike riding"
  • MartinGTMartinGT Posts: 475
    RichN95 wrote:
    Basically: Recruitment and Training

    Here are the steps

    1. Make sure the team leader is a top notch time triallist. No-one can help him in the TT. Wiggins, Froome & Porte are arguably the best three time triallists of GC riders.

    Wiggins has always been a decent TT'r during the recruitment process you tallk of, when did they see Froome Dawg as this Awesome TTr and GC rider? He was almost about to loose his ride from Sky before his out of the world ride at the Vuelta '11

    Porte, he has always shown potential as a TT'r


    2. Pay goods wages to stock pile a certain type of rider: those that have been top 20 in a Grand Tour, but never close to the top 5, and climb at a steady pace. Rogers, Kiryienka, Siutsou, Cataldo, Lopez, Zandio, Nieve, Deignan, Knees. And that's before we mention Henao & Uran or Thomas & Kennaugh.

    Sky have a very large budget, but then again so do BMC, Astana and Garmin. Climb at a steady pace, haha, you mean smash out stupid numbers for long periods.

    Did you know Rogers said that his time at Sky he was putting out better numbers than ever in his career. At the age of 32 to get an improvement of 1% at his level is massive, but from what he said it was closer to 5%! Oh and look what happened late last year.


    3. Have a deep squad so riders aren't overworked.

    Who says the other times are over worked?

    4. Constantly monitor and adjust training on a day-to-day basis using data and coaches who know what to do with it.

    Aye because no other team in the Peloton do that


    5. Run training camps where specific race scenarios suited to the team leader are practised.
    Again, no other team does this? Come on for christ sake, how do you think HTC got so successful with their leadout train? etc

    What you mean is, SKy train on Mt Teide as its at altitude



    6. Use the stockpile of climbers to control the race and bring about the scenario they have trained for so they can execute their drills. Be used to controlling and do it so frequently that other teams become conditioned to not just let you do it but expect you to do it.

    They sit on the front smacking out wattages. I do remember Brailsfraud or someone saying that clean riders cant put in multiple attacks or jump away from the peloton. Something Froome has done SEVERAL times last season alone

    This only works for stage races with significant time trialling, but that's really all they are the best at. They're fairly average at most other things.

    Ok my opinion in red then sir.
  • It's not what Sky do, it's what the others don't do.
    TWH, had it in one word: Timing:-Of everything.
    So much detail in that one word.

    They still don't light my fire, though.
    "Science is a tool for cheaters". An anonymous French PE teacher.
  • No_Ta_DoctorNo_Ta_Doctor Posts: 10,234
    MartinGT wrote:
    Brailsfraud

    Opinion invalidated by childish and petty name-calling. IMO.
    “Road racing was over and the UCI had banned my riding positions on the track, so it was like ‘Jings, crivvens, help ma Boab, what do I do now? I know, I’ll go away and be depressed for 10 years’.”

    @DrHeadgear

    The Vikings are coming!
  • nic_77nic_77 Posts: 929
    RichN95 wrote:
    Basically: Recruitment and Training

    Here are the steps

    1. Make sure the team leader is a top notch time triallist. No-one can help him in the TT. Wiggins, Froome & Porte are arguably the best three time triallists of GC riders.

    2. Pay goods wages to stock pile a certain type of rider: those that have been top 20 in a Grand Tour, but never close to the top 5, and climb at a steady pace. Rogers, Kiryienka, Siutsou, Cataldo, Lopez, Zandio, Nieve, Deignan, Knees. And that's before we mention Henao & Uran or Thomas & Kennaugh.

    3. Have a deep squad so riders aren't overworked.

    4. Constantly monitor and adjust training on a day-to-day basis using data and coaches who know what to do with it.

    5. Run training camps where specific race scenarios suited to the team leader are practised.

    6. Use the stockpile of climbers to control the race and bring about the scenario they have trained for so they can execute their drills. Be used to controlling and do it so frequently that other teams become conditioned to not just let you do it but expect you to do it.


    This only works for stage races with significant time trialling, but that's really all they are the best at. They're fairly average at most other things.

    Plus a load of other very small things.

    All of these techniques may be (or have been) employed by other teams to one degree or another. IMHO Sky's master stroke is making sure they combine all of them together.

    Marginal gains is no secret - It is both a simple and genius concept. You can do it yourself - think about the last time you went out on your bike, it took ages to get ready right?

    - Your bib shorts were inside out
    - You couldn't find that other glove
    - The Garmin was upstairs charging instead of being already attached to the bike
    - You had to move those boxes in order to get out of the garage
    etc etc

    Correcting any one of these things would make a tiny difference in your departure time, correcting them all and you start to become more efficient.
  • RichN95.RichN95. Posts: 24,604
    MartinGT wrote:
    Wiggins has always been a decent TT'r during the recruitment process you tallk of, when did they see Froome Dawg as this Awesome TTr and GC rider? He was almost about to loose his ride from Sky before his out of the world ride at the Vuelta '11

    Porte, he has always shown potential as a TT'r
    He wasn't about to lose his ride. Sky tactically used him as a key rider in that Vuelta. You didn't see him collecting bottles or riding on the front until the final climbs. As for when they saw his potential. Early one, but he need a lot of developing having had an unorthodox career. He was 14th in the final TT of his debut Tour as a neo-pro. That shows some potential.
    MartinGT wrote:
    Sky have a very large budget, but then again so do BMC, Astana and Garmin. Climb at a steady pace, haha, you mean smash out stupid numbers for long periods.

    Did you know Rogers said that his time at Sky he was putting out better numbers than ever in his career. At the age of 32 to get an improvement of 1% at his level is massive, but from what he said it was closer to 5%! Oh and look what happened late last year.
    How do you know the numbers are stupid? Have you seen them? I wouldn't take rider's self reassurance mechanisms as any indication of anything. And Rogers, unlike previous years, was riding with no intention of getting further than halfway up the final climb in the front group.
    MartinGT wrote:
    Who says the other teams are over worked?
    CQ Ranking do. Here's a list of the most kilometres ridden by riders. The highest Sky rider is 117th. Only six in the top 300.
    http://www.cqranking.com/men/asp/gen/St ... ?year=2013
    MartinGT wrote:
    Aye because no other team in the Peloton do that
    A few do. Most don't. You'll be surprised how backward most teams are. Many don't have a coach or a trained by some old pro with no qualifications. Plenty go back to their junior coaches for training plans. Plenty of riders still state that they prefer to train by 'feel'.
    MartinGT wrote:
    Again, no other team does this? Come on for christ sake, how do you think HTC got so successful with their leadout train? etc
    Again a few do. Most don't. If other teams are doing specific drills, then why aren't they using them in a race instead of letting Sky take control. You're right about HTC though. Have you noticed how many HTC riders ended up at Sky?

    MartinGT wrote:
    They sit on the front smacking out wattages. I do remember Brailsfraud or someone saying that clean riders cant put in multiple attacks or jump away from the peloton. Something Froome has done SEVERAL times last season alone

    When has he done multiple attacks? You might argue for Ventoux, but that was an attack to bridge across to Quintana, followed by another quite some time later on a rider who been on a long attack himself.
    Twitter: @RichN95
  • PBoPBo Posts: 2,493
    MartinGT wrote:
    RichN95 wrote:
    Basically: Recruitment and Training

    Here are the steps

    1. Make sure the team leader is a top notch time triallist. No-one can help him in the TT. Wiggins, Froome & Porte are arguably the best three time triallists of GC riders.

    Wiggins has always been a decent TT'r during the recruitment process you tallk of, when did they see Froome Dawg as this Awesome TTr and GC rider? He was almost about to loose his ride from Sky before his out of the world ride at the Vuelta '11

    Porte, he has always shown potential as a TT'r


    2. Pay goods wages to stock pile a certain type of rider: those that have been top 20 in a Grand Tour, but never close to the top 5, and climb at a steady pace. Rogers, Kiryienka, Siutsou, Cataldo, Lopez, Zandio, Nieve, Deignan, Knees. And that's before we mention Henao & Uran or Thomas & Kennaugh.

    Sky have a very large budget, but then again so do BMC, Astana and Garmin. Climb at a steady pace, haha, you mean smash out stupid numbers for long periods.

    Did you know Rogers said that his time at Sky he was putting out better numbers than ever in his career. At the age of 32 to get an improvement of 1% at his level is massive, but from what he said it was closer to 5%! Oh and look what happened late last year.


    Garmin? Who's manager said:
    @UCI_Overlord not sure why ppl are surprised by sky:a few €800k guys pulling a €900k guy, who then pulls for a €1.3m guy,who helps a €2m guy


    3. Have a deep squad so riders aren't overworked.

    Who says the other times are over worked?

    4. Constantly monitor and adjust training on a day-to-day basis using data and coaches who know what to do with it.

    Aye because no other team in the Peloton do that


    5. Run training camps where specific race scenarios suited to the team leader are practised.
    Again, no other team does this? Come on for christ sake, how do you think HTC got so successful with their leadout train? etc

    What you mean is, SKy train on Mt Teide as its at altitude



    6. Use the stockpile of climbers to control the race and bring about the scenario they have trained for so they can execute their drills. Be used to controlling and do it so frequently that other teams become conditioned to not just let you do it but expect you to do it.

    They sit on the front smacking out wattages. I do remember Brailsfraud or someone saying that clean riders cant put in multiple attacks or jump away from the peloton. Something Froome has done SEVERAL times last season alone

    This only works for stage races with significant time trialling, but that's really all they are the best at. They're fairly average at most other things.

    Ok my opinion in red then sir.
  • PBoPBo Posts: 2,493
    RichN95 wrote:
    MartinGT wrote:
    Wiggins has always been a decent TT'r during the recruitment process you tallk of, when did they see Froome Dawg as this Awesome TTr and GC rider? He was almost about to loose his ride from Sky before his out of the world ride at the Vuelta '11

    Porte, he has always shown potential as a TT'r
    He wasn't about to lose his ride. Sky tactically used him as a key rider in that Vuelta. You didn't see him collecting bottles or riding on the front until the final climbs. As for when they saw his potential. Early one, but he need a lot of developing having had an unorthodox career. He was 14th in the final TT of his debut Tour as a neo-pro. That shows some potential.
    MartinGT wrote:
    Sky have a very large budget, but then again so do BMC, Astana and Garmin. Climb at a steady pace, haha, you mean smash out stupid numbers for long periods.

    Did you know Rogers said that his time at Sky he was putting out better numbers than ever in his career. At the age of 32 to get an improvement of 1% at his level is massive, but from what he said it was closer to 5%! Oh and look what happened late last year.
    How do you know the numbers are stupid? Have you seen them? I wouldn't take rider's self reassurance mechanisms as any indication of anything. And Rogers, unlike previous years, was riding with no intention of getting further than halfway up the final climb in the front group.
    MartinGT wrote:
    Who says the other teams are over worked?
    CQ Ranking do. Here's a list of the most kilometres ridden by riders. The highest Sky rider is 117th. Only six in the top 300.
    http://www.cqranking.com/men/asp/gen/St ... ?year=2013
    MartinGT wrote:
    Aye because no other team in the Peloton do that
    A few do. Most don't. You'll be surprised how backward most teams are. Many don't have a coach or a trained by some old pro with no qualifications. Plenty go back to their junior coaches for training plans. Plenty of riders still state that they prefer to train by 'feel'.
    MartinGT wrote:
    Again, no other team does this? Come on for christ sake, how do you think HTC got so successful with their leadout train? etc
    Again a few do. Most don't. If other teams are doing specific drills, then why aren't they using them in a race instead of letting Sky take control. You're right about HTC though. Have you noticed how many HTC riders ended up at Sky?

    although, how many GTs did HTC win, remind me?
    MartinGT wrote:
    They sit on the front smacking out wattages. I do remember Brailsfraud or someone saying that clean riders cant put in multiple attacks or jump away from the peloton. Something Froome has done SEVERAL times last season alone

    When has he done multiple attacks? You might argue for Ventoux, but that was an attack to bridge across to Quintana, followed by another quite some time later on a rider who been on a long attack himself.
  • CrankbrotherCrankbrother Posts: 1,695
    Hire the strongest riders?

    EBH, Porte, Flecha & Cav aside they've hired capable riders, on par with Cervelo TT ... As the OP asked (and I was ridiculed for the same a few months back) was what made these guys (esp. Wiggins/Froome) into world beaters ... Wiggins was a winner but in a very different arena (literally) ... Other than those I mentioned ... Well, on any other team???
  • RichN95.RichN95. Posts: 24,604
    Hire the strongest riders?

    EBH, Porte, Flecha & Cav aside they've hired capable riders, on par with Cervelo TT
    You're looking at it for a 'Galactico' point of view. A good team isn't made up of stars with lots of ranking points, it's made up of the people best equipped to do the job. Only one rider wins the race. Sky aren't trying to win a fantasy league.
    As I've said, Sky have a 'type' - riders who are have finished in the top 20 in a GT and can reach the final climb and ride at a high tempo for a given period of time.

    "I picked the best team, but not necessarily the best players" - Marcelo Lippi on how he won the 2006 World Cup.
    Twitter: @RichN95
This discussion has been closed.