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Specialized Status 2

whitey161whitey161 Posts: 110
edited December 2013 in Your mountain bikes
I've shared the custom XC/Trail build that i'm doing so why not share this I guess. Here is my other steed, as I bought it, no upgrades as of yet. That will begin once the Remedy is finished. First order of business low friction seals for the boxxers as they are way too sticky for my liking and then some softer springs if that doesn't solve the problem as its sat at 20% sag.

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Posts

  • ilovedirtilovedirt Posts: 5,798
    If you want to change the sag, you need a new spring, changing the seals will do censored all.
    Production Privee Shan

    B'Twin Triban 5
  • Aye that's why I say change the spring but it's probably on the cusp of being ok. Main issue is the stiction and force required to get the forks working.
    Gravity-Fed Media - A page to showcase my MTB and Snowboard Edits

    http://www.facebook.com/GFM2005
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    Your spring is way too firm if you're only getting 20% sag. Should be closer to 30%. I had low friction seals fitted to my BoXXers and it makes censored all difference.
    Nice bike, those Status frames are really good, personally I think they ride better than Demos
  • ilovedirtilovedirt Posts: 5,798
    whitey161 wrote:
    Aye that's why I say change the spring but it's probably on the cusp of being ok. Main issue is the stiction and force required to get the forks working.
    Stiction won't account for that. Check the preload spacers on the spring side, they tend to come with 3 or 4 of them fitted, take some of them out. And as I said, new spring. New seals won't make any difference.
    Production Privee Shan

    B'Twin Triban 5
  • Thanks for the info guys. New springs first off then i think once the Trail bike is done.
    Also ill take a look at these preload spacers.
    Gravity-Fed Media - A page to showcase my MTB and Snowboard Edits

    http://www.facebook.com/GFM2005
  • One more question. How do i know how far up the rear damper the spring should be set. there is a thread which runs the length of it and a plastic..umm...'nut' which you can rotate up and down the shaft. Where abouts should it be? Ive fiddled a touch but unsure.
    Gravity-Fed Media - A page to showcase my MTB and Snowboard Edits

    http://www.facebook.com/GFM2005
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    I guess you mean the preload collar? The ring which compresses the spring?
    You can use it to set the sag, ideally around 30% of the stroke. Be careful though, if you have too much sag then the coil will completely compress before the shock bottoms out.
    Any more than about half an inch of preload would suggest that you need a heavier coil but if the standard fork spring is too heavy for you then you will probably need a lighter spring on the rear as well (dirt cheap on ebay).
  • Great thanks. Yeah i have done a bit of reading and yes the preload washer. GOnna check how it is set up this afternoon when i finally finish work!!
    Gravity-Fed Media - A page to showcase my MTB and Snowboard Edits

    http://www.facebook.com/GFM2005
  • ilovedirtilovedirt Posts: 5,798
    Set the sag BEFORE preload. Preload does not make up for having an incorrect spring for your weight. Preload simply firms up the initial part of the travel. If you have too soft a spring, it might sort the sag out a little, but it won't stop you from blowing through the rest of the travel and handling like censored .


    In short, measure the sag with the collar threaded out such that the spring is held in place, but not compressed. If you do not have the required sag, you need a new spring. It's worth experimenting with a couple of different weight springs. It's important to get these things right, as the bike was designed with certain suspension characteristics, and if it's over or under sprung, you won't get the most out of it, and it probably won't be much fun to ride.
    Production Privee Shan

    B'Twin Triban 5
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    Preload is ok for fine tuning sag.
  • ilovedirtilovedirt Posts: 5,798
    Well obviously you can only get the spring rates in increments of whatever is available, but it doesn't make up for having entirely the wrong spring (for example, 20% sag, when you want 30%, as the OP mentioned...)
    Production Privee Shan

    B'Twin Triban 5
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    These are great frames. I have been seeing a lot of these at races this year, quite a few with really nice builds ridden by sponsored riders.
    Some people prefer these to Demo's, apparently the rear end doesn't feel as heavy on these.
  • Thanks alot for the advice guys. Get christmas out the way and ill try some different springs. Yeah i really feel its not as good as it could be because the ride is too harsh. Surely specialized should provide it with the correct spring.

    If i moan at them will they swap them do you think?
    Gravity-Fed Media - A page to showcase my MTB and Snowboard Edits

    http://www.facebook.com/GFM2005
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    Specialized (like all manufacturers) sell bikes with a mediumish set up.
    Some shops will swap springs to set the bike up for you when you buy it but that's the exception rather than the norm.
    It won't really cost you anything. Buy springs from ebay and sell your old ones.
    TF Tuned have a rear spring weight calculator on their website and you can find the Boxxer set up manual on the SRAM website which will tell you what fork spring you need.
    Don't be tempted by titanium coils until you have found a good set up and tested it for a while with a cheap steel spring.
    Downhill bike suspension set up can take a bit of time to get right but it's worth taking your time to get it right.
    Try asking on either ride.io or pinkbike forums for some base settings as a starting point.
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