DOH! just worked out how expensive my 'winter' build got to.

matt-h
matt-h Posts: 847
edited December 2013 in Road general
Decied a couple of months ago to build up a winter bike over a couple of months.
Bought most parts new depending on what was on offer.
The total has come out at just over £1000! :oops: :shock:

Cant believe how out of hand it got, it was supposed to be rival to the Ribble winter trainer but worked out a lot more expensive
Below is the spec

Dolan preffisio with Alpina Carbon Fork - £200
105 165mm Chainset and BB £120
105 Cassette - £27
105 Rear mech £30
105 Front deraliuer £20
105 Shifters £85 (used)
105 Brakes - £40
Ultegra Chain £15
Missing link £5
Deda Zero1 Stem £20
Deda RH02 £20
Deda Superzero Carbon Post £90 ( this was from my other bike, not new but will ned to replaced on best bike)
Specialized Romin Pro Ti Seat £85 ( this was from my other bike, not newbut will ned to replaced on best bike)
Pedal - M520 SPD £17
Shimano Cables £40
Fizik bar tape with gel pads £25
Stem spacers £5
Wheelset - Ambrosio Excellight, 105 hubs, Sapim spokes - £189 ( this was from my other bike, not new)
Tyres - Contimental 25mm Gatorskins and tubes £40
£1054!

I could have probably got a used really nice steel framed bike that would take mudguards :roll:
The plus side is that it rides and looks really nice

Matt

Comments

  • chris_bass
    chris_bass Posts: 4,913
    matt-h wrote:
    The plus side is that it rides and looks really nice

    That's all that matters! oh, and don't tell Mrs H!
    www.conjunctivitis.com - a site for sore eyes
  • Pituophis
    Pituophis Posts: 1,025
    If it makes you feel any better, I slowly bought new parts (the majority, but not all) from Ribble, and built up my bike to my own spec, to get back into the habit, and remember how things went together.
    I worked out later that if I had let Ribble build the bike to the same spec, it would have saved me a fair few quid :oops:
  • flasher
    flasher Posts: 1,734
    Ribble winter trainer with 105, a decent set of wheels , pedals etc. comes to a grand.
  • Sir Velo
    Sir Velo Posts: 143
    Could have picked up a half decent bike from the classified ads for £500 (or even less) that would have done for winter. Although most important thing is that it meets your requirements and you are happy with it.

    SV
  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    LOL - I wont tell you about the sub £500 Ultegra Groupset deal on CRC at the weekend then....
  • I built up a winter bike earlier this year, well it's really a bad weather bike I suppose, I used it in the summer too, it cost quite a bit more than this...I stopped adding up the cost when it got over £1000 in case Mrs CR found out!
  • Grill
    Grill Posts: 5,610
    Flasher wrote:
    Ribble winter trainer with 105, a decent set of wheels , pedals etc. comes to a grand.

    Errr... they're the same bike.
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • flasher
    flasher Posts: 1,734
    Grill wrote:
    Flasher wrote:
    Ribble winter trainer with 105, a decent set of wheels , pedals etc. comes to a grand.

    Errr... they're the same bike.


    Errr….what?
  • Grill
    Grill Posts: 5,610
    Preffisio and the winter trainer are the same frame.
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • alihisgreat
    alihisgreat Posts: 3,872
    You should only take half the value of the bits that you switched over from your best bike to give a reasonable second hand value... and it comes in at a much more sensible figure.
  • trek_dan
    trek_dan Posts: 1,366
    Pretty similar spec to my winter bike, if it rides great why worry :D I really like mine too.
    If you don't add on the parts you already had it works out pretty cheap anyway.
  • StillGoing
    StillGoing Posts: 5,211
    Just in the process of doing my own "winter" build having got hold of a new Dolan Ares frame set cheap direct from Dolan. A winter bike to me is something that spends most of the time on the turbo or I don't mind taking out to get covered in crap from the salty, mud splattered roads. Neither I or my cycling buddies ride with mudguards so fitting them was never a priority.

    I didn't bother bidding on a new SRAM Force 22 full groupset thinking it would go for silly money (went for £400; how wrong can you be) so hatched a plan to swap my SRAM Force/Red form the current winter bike to the new build and get new SRAM Rival gear for the old bike in order to sell it on. Managed to get the Rival gear for just over £300 from various outlets and the bike looks like new.

    New build has had a few bits spent on it such as FSA K-Wing bars and another Fizik Arione Vs K:Sium seat but I already have wheels for both bikes so my build for both bikes complete comes in at around £1,200. Selling the Trek will recoup a good percentage of that for me.
    I ride a bike. Doesn't make me green or a tree hugger. I drive a car too.
  • smidsy
    smidsy Posts: 5,273
    If you buy all individually sourced components new it will generally tend to work out more expensive than an off the shelf complete bike.

    Obviously if you get everything at massive discounts you may do it cheaper but that takes a lot of time and effort too.

    The real benefit of building your own is you get the exact mix of components that you want, get satisfaction from the build process and know that it has been done properly.

    If you would rather get a cheap deal then building you own is generally not the best solution.
    Yellow is the new Black.
  • matt-h
    matt-h Posts: 847
    Cheers all,
    Chris Bass wrote:
    matt-h wrote:
    The plus side is that it rides and looks really nice
    That's all that matters! oh, and don't tell Mrs H!
    Amen!
    Flasher wrote:
    Ribble winter trainer with 105, a decent set of wheels , pedals etc. comes to a grand.
    Thats good to know, probably not as nice finishing kit either
    cougie wrote:
    LOL - I wont tell you about the sub £500 Ultegra Groupset deal on CRC at the weekend then....
    Coudnt afford to replace the components that often, happy with 6800 on my other bike though
    Grill wrote:
    Preffisio and the winter trainer are the same frame.
    Didn't know that
    You should only take half the value of the bits that you switched over from your best bike to give a reasonable second hand value... and it comes in at a much more sensible figure.
    trek_dan wrote:
    Pretty similar spec to my winter bike, if it rides great why worry :D I really like mine too. If you don't add on the parts you already had it works out pretty cheap anyway.
    Makes sense.

    Philthy3, Smidsy,
    Glad i built it up myself.
    It was my first one and gives me a ot more confidence maintaining my other bikes
  • Just bought one of these as my new winter bike, rides beautifully, more like my Six than I'd could of believed.

    http://www.evanscycles.com/products/cha ... e-ec042794

    I looked at building a bike but just couldn't do it for the money with new bits, I don't get why would you want to buy second hand components and end up with a bike that still cost more than a new one given the bike deals that are around at the moment? Granted if you've already got the bits lying around it's a different story :wink:
  • Just bought one of these as my new winter bike, rides beautifully, more like my Six than I'd could have believed.

    http://www.evanscycles.com/products/cha ... e-ec042794
    I'm sorry, but a bike called Charge Juicer is just wrong.

    Wrong, wrong, wrong.

    Wrong.
    Is the gorilla tired yet?
  • Yeah well I try to put that to the back of my mind, and the graphic is hard to see! :lol:
  • It's not a prerequisite to winter training to have a shite bike!

    I think the main reason most ppl have crap winter bikes is because they don't want to, or can't afford a second decent bike for winter. If I had enough spare cash, my winter bike would be same as my summer bike as far as possible. I'd want mudguard fitting frame is all and either carbon or titanium as they'll hold up to salt etc.

    Why suffer with a substandard ride set-up when the rides are generally longer and more arduous?
  • Grill
    Grill Posts: 5,610
    It's not a prerequisite to winter training to have a shite bike!

    I think the main reason most ppl have crap winter bikes is because they don't want to, or can't afford a second decent bike for winter. If I had enough spare cash, my winter bike would be same as my summer bike as far as possible. I'd want mudguard fitting frame is all and either carbon or titanium as they'll hold up to salt etc.

    Why suffer with a substandard ride set-up when the rides are generally longer and more arduous?

    Agreed. Which is why my winter bike is a Scott Foil. :mrgreen:
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • Bozman
    Bozman Posts: 2,518
    It's not a prerequisite to winter training to have a shite bike!

    I think the main reason most ppl have crap winter bikes is because they don't want to, or can't afford a second decent bike for winter. If I had enough spare cash, my winter bike would be same as my summer bike as far as possible. I'd want mudguard fitting frame is all and either carbon or titanium as they'll hold up to salt etc.

    Why suffer with a substandard ride set-up when the rides are generally longer and more arduous?

    I couldn't agree more apart from one thing, mudguards. I loath riding my winter bike but when it's wet or damp I'm glad of the mudguards, if it's dry I'm out on another bike.

    I'd taken the mudguards off the bike for cleaning the other week and I couldn't be bothered to put them on before my next ride, when I got back I was covered in black, the bike was just caked in the salt/grit and grim off the roads, add the mud off the lanes and it was like a scene from the Paris Roubaix. There was water in the BB and seat tube, grit ground in to the mechs and chain, sod that I'm sticking with mudguards.
  • It's not a prerequisite to winter training to have a shite bike!

    I think the main reason most ppl have crap winter bikes is because they don't want to, or can't afford a second decent bike for winter. If I had enough spare cash, my winter bike would be same as my summer bike as far as possible. I'd want mudguard fitting frame is all and either carbon or titanium as they'll hold up to salt etc.

    Why suffer with a substandard ride set-up when the rides are generally longer and more arduous?
    20 years ago it was almost a badge of honour to have the heaviest, shittest winter bike going. It was rumoured that certain top riders in the NW would even add weight to their saddle bag or panniers. That way when racing season came around the difference felt in equipment was huge.As long as the position was identical what could go wrong. As for riding without mudguards thats fine for solo riding but much frowned upon if riding in a group or particuarly going out with a club.
  • Not sure my post reads correctly.

    I will always insist on mudguards no matter whether my bike is steel, alu, carbon or ti.

    My point was if I had the disposable income to do so, I'd see no reason not to splurge on Dura Ace, a good frame and wheels for winter.

    The whole riding an iron thru winter thing has surely run its course. You'll feel the benefit for what, a day after getting on your Sumer bike. Not really worth putting up with the whole winter bump n grind of a crappy old iron for that.
  • My winter bike isn't a bad ride at all, i'm actually rather pleased with it.

    Although none of my bikes are particularly expensive.
  • smidsy
    smidsy Posts: 5,273
    It was rumoured that certain top riders in the NW would even add weight to their saddle bag or panniers. That way when racing season came around the difference felt in equipment was huge.

    What is really unbeleiveable is that racers would have panniers/saddle bags at all. :|
    Yellow is the new Black.
  • smidsy wrote:
    It was rumoured that certain top riders in the NW would even add weight to their saddle bag or panniers. That way when racing season came around the difference felt in equipment was huge.

    What is really unbeleiveable is that racers would have panniers/saddle bags at all. :|
    I know its unbelieveable son but its true. We are though talking of a by gone age of down tube levers, clips and straps and cinelli xa stems.And all this talk of 100miles like its some mythical distance was done every Sunday whatever the weather and on crap bikes..... My god i do sound like a right old T**t!!
  • smidsy
    smidsy Posts: 5,273
    Are you from the 1930's? :-)
    Yellow is the new Black.
  • smidsy wrote:
    Are you from the 1930's? :-)
    Who me? I started in the 80's just when clipless pedals were coming out, the early sti's and still used hairnet helmets. A transitional period you might say between the past and the present.
  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    smidsy wrote:
    It was rumoured that certain top riders in the NW would even add weight to their saddle bag or panniers. That way when racing season came around the difference felt in equipment was huge.

    What is really unbeleiveable is that racers would have panniers/saddle bags at all. :|

    Not really - they're not racing on these bikes - its just their hack bike at the weekend and people weren't as rich as they are today. Maybe a commuter bike and a race bike was their limit.