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PSI

RenryRenry Posts: 15
edited December 2013 in MTB beginners
Im riding a 29er with Nobby Nics. The tyre states a PSI range of 26-54 PSI

What sort of PSI should I be looking at for differing conditions? I am a tad over 12 stone in weight.

Posts

  • Whatever works for you in that range. Remembering the lower you go the more likely you'll pinch flat if you're tubed.
  • Lower psi will give more grip in muddy conditions - but be aware of chunkers1980 advice. Higher psi will be better when riding hard stuff/road etc.
  • compocompo Posts: 1,370
    0 PSI, for you should not be riding a wagon wheeler
  • ClankClank Posts: 2,323
    compo wrote:
    0 PSI, for you should not be riding a wagon wheeler

    That's a touch unnecessary - just 'cos you don't like 'em.

    I ran my 29er on 35psi and above (this was on 2.2 Ralphs) - and I'm half a stone heavier than the OP. Less than 35psi and I found I pinch-flats common, especially on slabby ground.

    Typically, I ran 40psi for everything (I can't be bothered messing about pressures) and this gave me a great balance of grip and speed. It worked well in mud too (I found the 29er tyre made better use of it's grip than the equivalent tyres in 26" format).
    How would I write my own epitaph? With a crayon - I'm not allowed anything I can sharpen to a sustainable point.

    Disclaimer: Opinions expressed herein are worth exactly what you paid for them.
  • RenryRenry Posts: 15
    I'm pretty happy with my 'wagon wheel' thank you. I too
    Am running at 35 psi. Seems about right for too.
  • CqcCqc Posts: 951
    As has been said, 29ers are a joke, but i generally have soft in the front, hard in the back, as I like it when the back end slides around in corners
  • RenryRenry Posts: 15
    Cqc wrote:
    As has been said, 29ers are a joke, but i generally have soft in the front, hard in the back, as I like it when the back end slides around in corners

    I didn't realise this thread was to raise the debate about peoples opinion On the size if wheels. I Suggest you leave that for the threads that have been
    Raging elsewhere.
  • stubsstubs Posts: 5,258
    Only you can decide whats best for your bike but a good starter is 35 psi front and rear. If you ride on rocky terrain you might need to go higher to prevent pinch flats and lower if its boggy for better grip. Experiment take your pump with you find a nice short loop and try different pressures you will be amazed the difference 5 psi can make.
    Fig rolls: proof that god loves cyclists and that she wants us to do another lap
  • NorthwindNorthwind Posts: 15,475
    Deflate until you get a flat. Then reinflate.

    Well OK, that's a silly way to put it but it's basically what I do- I want my pressures as low as I can get away without puncturing or mangling rims, and the only real way to do that is experimentation. But no 2 riders ride the same way, on the same trails, on the same bike so recommendations are only so much help.

    I have no completely unrequested negative opinion on 29ers, but Nobby Nics are **** ;) Puncturey and not very grippy. So it's quite hard to find an ideal pressure, since it needs to be a little higher than most to keep the air in, but you really want it to be a bit lower to generate a little extra grip.
    Uncompromising extremist
  • I use 17-18psi on my Canyon most of the time, but I've got high volume tyres and pretty wide rims.
    Pump it up a bit if I'm doing any climbing.

    I use 25-30psi on the spesh depending on conditions.

    Its all personal preference though. Just use whatever feels "right" and where you aren't getting a load of punctures.
  • POAHPOAH Posts: 3,369
    Cqc wrote:
    but i generally have soft in the front, hard in the back

    that's how cooldad likes it too :lol:
  • 97th choice97th choice Posts: 2,305
    stubs wrote:
    Only you can decide whats best for your bike but a good starter is 35 psi front and rear. If you ride on rocky terrain you might need to go higher to prevent pinch flats and lower if its boggy for better grip. Experiment take your pump with you find a nice short loop and try different pressures you will be amazed the difference 5 psi can make.


    This as a good starter, as a relativey useless rule of thumb I run lower pressures on natural trails and higher on trail centres
    Too-ra-loo-ra, too-ra-loo-rye, aye

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  • njee20njee20 Posts: 9,613
    About 25psi here, all round.
  • CitizenLeeCitizenLee Posts: 2,227
    Around 35psi all year, all conditions. I don't like squishy feeling tyres.
    Current:
    NukeProof Mega FR 2012
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    Previous:
    2015 Genesis CdF 10, 2014 Cube Hyde Race, 2012 NS Traffic, 2007 Specialized SX Trail, 2005 Specialized Demo 8
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,904
    POAH wrote:
    Cqc wrote:
    but i generally have soft in the front, hard in the back

    that's how cooldad likes it too :lol:
    Which is why I was so disappointed with you. Severe case of brewer's droop.
    I don't do smileys.

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