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New wheels or a bike fit?

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  • Kajjal wrote:
    ju5t1n wrote:
    I would like to see one of the cycling magazines pay the same rider take the same bike to 10 different bike fitters and compare the results

    That would be interesting.
    +1 :!:
    Lapierre Aircode 300
    Merida
  • I would like to see one of the cycling magazines pay the same rider take the same bike to 10 different bike fitters and compare the results

    It would only be interesting if you have a gold standard to go by. It also depends on what you tell the fitter. if you go in and say you want to be faster, able to be more aero, etc then that is what they will do for you. I went in and said I want to be comfortable on 200miles upwards and multi day. That is what i got.

    I ride a bike worth over £3k so why would I skimp on 185 for adrian. he was worth every penny.
    Chris
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    What £200 wheelset would you call either an upgrade or an investment?

    So you are going to have a £200 bike fit on an Allez with CXP 22's that you have not changed anything on in two years and then ride it for half as long as you already have before buying an italian carbon framed bike online without test riding :lol:

    Why buy new wheels if you are getting a 2 grand bike next year?
    Where do your 'investment wheels' fit in with this purchase? They will be worse than the ones on the new bike and they (the ones on the new bike) will need upgrading to do the new bike justice anyway!

    If you know that "spending money isn't needed" why are you buying a bike 3 times the cost of your current one?
  • I wouldn't bother with a bike fit unless you feel uncomfortable or are picking up injuries such as knee or neck pain. Have a look at the many web pages that describe bike fitting and if you're well aligned with that advice then why pay good money for something you don't need?

    The common argument is that because you've shelled out a couple of grand for a new bike then a couple of hundred quid for a bike fit is deemed necessary. I don't buy that argument to be honest, unless you have money to burn or you have a genuine issue to resolve.

    I'd say upgrade the wheels for a tangible improvement. I upgraded my CXP22 wheels to Fulcrum Racing 5. Don't expect to see a sudden improvement in your speed but they definitely feel better. Stiffer, quicker to pick up speed and absolutely bomb proof - I've yet to tighten even 1 spoke and they remain arrow straight!
  • iPeteiPete Posts: 6,076
    Neither for the many reasons stated. It's also December so I wouldn't bother with the wheels.

    Put it aside for the new bike or spend it on mud guards and some nice winter clothing and keep on putting in the miles in comfort.
  • iPete wrote:
    ... or spend it on mud guards

    NO!
  • iPete wrote:
    ... or spend it on mud guards

    NO!

    What's wrong with mudguards then?
    "You really think you can burn off sugar with exercise?" downhill paul
  • iPeteiPete Posts: 6,076
    iPete wrote:
    ... or spend it on mud guards

    NO!

    What's wrong with mudguards then?

    Ugo must be one of those fair weather types :wink:
  • bucklesbuckles Posts: 694
    Yes.
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  • iPete wrote:
    Ugo must be one of those fair weather types :wink:

    Mudguards are for fair weather... when it rains they make no difference... :wink:
  • Mad_MalxMad_Malx Posts: 4,712
    edited December 2013
    Carbonator wrote:
    What £200 wheelset would you call either an upgrade or an investment

    A pair of Mavic Aksiums or the equivalent Fulcrums will be a lot better than the 2 year old originals. And will do as winter/wet weather spares when he buys a new bike (which won't have much better wheels at that price).
  • If anyone wants to come round to my house for a chat and some pizza for £40 an hour they'd be very welcome. Might even add some salad. Cash only!
  • iPeteiPete Posts: 6,076
    iPete wrote:
    Ugo must be one of those fair weather types :wink:

    Mudguards are for fair weather... when it rains they make no difference... :wink:

    I don't know, I'm normally quite smug when I get in from my hour+ commute in a monsoon and have dry feet!

    But it's ok, I've seen your steeds, I wouldn't put mudguards near them either! :wink:
  • bucklesbuckles Posts: 694
    I, like many other cyclists, enjoy having a dry arsecrack and not having censored sprayed from my fellow clubmens rear wheels into my face. If that's somehow 'wrong' then fine, ban us from cycling.
    25% off your first MyProtein order: sign up via https://www.myprotein.com/referrals.lis ... EE-R29Y&li or use my referral code LEE-R29Y
  • smidsysmidsy Posts: 5,273
    Mudguards are for fair weather... when it rains they make no difference... :wink:

    Now on this we will definitely disagree. They make a world of difference (to everone else) when riding in a group.

    People who turn up to group rides in wet weather without mudguards are inconsiderate, selfish and should be made to ride 50 yards behind everyone else as pennance.
    Yellow is the new Black.
  • smoggystevesmoggysteve Posts: 2,909
    smidsy wrote:
    Mudguards are for fair weather... when it rains they make no difference... :wink:

    Now on this we will definitely disagree. They make a world of difference (to everone else) when riding in a group.

    People who turn up to group rides in wet weather without mudguards are inconsiderate, selfish and should be made to ride 50 yards behind everyone else as pennance.

    I hate mudguards. never ever liked them. but, as Smidsy says, for the consideration of others I will use them. if I am on my own, which is probably about 90% of the time, I will go without. I dress correct to the conditions so I dont get wet or cold. The problem is the amout of crud that gets kicked up off a rear tyre other than rain water. I have had more clothes covered in oil and fuel that seeps out of all the hidden cracks and holes in the road than I care to remember. imagine all this being sprayed in your face and even possibly your mouth and eyes.
  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    Turning up without guards for group rides in the wet is simply inconsiderate - more often than not it's the same people who ride lighter-weight race tyres in winter, don't carry a pump and a spare and under-dressed for the conditions and over-estimate their capabilities. Chances are they'll get a puncture in the middle of nowhere, expect someone to lend them a pump and spare; get cold and then 'bonk' due to the delayed stop and then expect someone to chaperone them home because they don't know the way home. Been there, got the tee-shirt....
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
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