Aero bars

chemicalviking
chemicalviking Posts: 284
edited October 2013 in Road buying advice
Hi all,

Looking at getting some aero bars for xmas, but there are so many options. I am going to be using them through the winter while on the turbo and im looking to get into maybe doing some TT races next season.

Any brands that are better than others? Budget should be around £100 . Thanks in advance for any ideas.

Comments

  • Slightly over budget, but have a look at Zipp Vuka Alumina. You have to decide up front whether you want pads that mount the aeros above or below your handle bars, and also whether you want ski tip or S bend aerobars.

    Once that's out the way, they are very, very adjustable. There's also a separate riser set (£) you can get to bring the pads up a bit higher.
    Swim. Bike. Run. Yeah. That's what I used to do.

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  • jotko
    jotko Posts: 457
    edited October 2013
    I am no expert at all, but my understanding is the type of bars you want depend on how much you want to mess around with your bike to set it up for a TT position, full length TT bars on a road bike will usually need to be used with a shorter stem otherwise you will be too stretched out, this compromising your position for normal riding.

    A shorty set of bars, such as Profile GT Jammers, can be used on a road bike without messing around with different stems and saddle position. These are what I have on my road bike and it works really well - I just clip them on/off when I want them and dont change anything else.

    I am sure they are not as aero-optimum as full lentgh bars but they made a big difference to my speed for TTs (~10%) and are easy to live with, its nice just having a another position for normal rides as well.

    These are what I use - http://www.wiggle.co.uk/profile-jammer-gt-aerobars/
  • Crozza
    Crozza Posts: 991
    Well under budget, and a good use of selection box leftovers
  • Kimble
    Kimble Posts: 53
    am a fan of the profile design T2 ... the S bend is great for getting leverage on the bars when you're really pushing a big gear. I have the carbon version and am a little sorry I didn't go for the alu version as i've had some slight surface cracking in the extension bars... pretty good adjustability too. make sure to cover the ends in bar tape for extra grip.

    FWIW I've since acquired a profile design carbon base bar on fleabay and by using the existing t2+ pads and extensions (and some tt brakes / shifters) have created a full TT cockpit which is really comfortable.

    cheap as chips at the moment for a quality product. http://www.koo-bikes.com/profile-design ... tAodM2sAkg
  • I tried quite a few aerobars before finding these Deda's which are fantastic. Simple, light, and put my arms in the perfect position.

  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    Token bars get a good write up and about £40.

    They're pretty simple really. Pads. A secure clamp. Two sticky out bits.
  • Thanks again for the replies, certainly gives me plenty to look at. The chocolate aero bars look good but they would'nt last long :-)
  • The Deda Parabolica bars are good value for the moeny, especially as they can be had for £56 inc del from Wiggle. I've tried the Uno and Duo on TT's before and will be getting a set of Duo's for next year.
  • jotko wrote:
    I am no expert at all, but my understanding is the type of bars you want depend on how much you want to mess around with your bike to set it up for a TT position, full length TT bars on a road bike will usually need to be used with a shorter stem otherwise you will be too stretched out, this compromising your position for normal riding.

    A shorty set of bars, such as Profile GT Jammers, can be used on a road bike without messing around with different stems and saddle position. These are what I have on my road bike and it works really well - I just clip them on/off when I want them and dont change anything else.

    I am sure they are not as aero-optimum as full lentgh bars but they made a big difference to my speed for TTs (~10%) and are easy to live with, its nice just having a another position for normal rides as well.

    These are what I use - http://www.wiggle.co.uk/profile-jammer-gt-aerobars/

    I really agree with this as you really need to know what putting a set of tri-bars is going to do with your position on your road bike. You can't just slap a pair of tri-bars on a road bike and expect to be going faster.

    You're probably not going to get any lower on tri-bars than you are on the drops, you may well get narrower, which will help to some degree. You should also look at moving your saddle as far forward as possible, which will open up your hip angle and you won't feel as squashed. So you may even want to look at a 2nd seatpost and saddle to use specifically when you're riding a TT.

    I converted a road bike into a TT bike using a Profile Design Fast Forward seatpost, but the main problem was the length (or height) of the head tube. I had to remove all the spacers and flip the stem to get lower and even then I could have done with the stem pointing down.

    Lastly, be aware that as you're further forward, you may find yourself sitting much further forward on the pointy end of the saddle. You may want to think about a more specific time trial saddle.

    Have a look at these:

    http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/category/ ... n-10-39345

    http://www.redshiftsports.com/

    http://www.bikeradar.com/road/news/arti ... ook-37527/

    Cheers,

    Dunedin397