Who fixes their won tubs?

brit66
brit66 Posts: 350
edited October 2013 in Road general
I used to ride tubs back in the 80s when I got my first 'good' road bike (Reynolds 531 steel frame, ah those were the days :)), but I remember buying a new tub each time I punctured... those were crazy times! :shock:

Anyway, I'd like to ride tubs again but being all grown up and money conscious now, I will only do so if I can fix them myself.

So, for those who repair their own, how easy is it? Is it a case oflooking at the odd article/YouTube video and just giving it a go?

I'm not willing to pay someone else and I'm pretty dextrous with my hands (ooh, er missus), so am thinking it can't be that difficult... or is it? :cry:

Thanks

Comments

  • davidof
    davidof Posts: 3,042
    I used to race in the 70s and 80s and always fixed tubs. You find the puncture, cut through the stitching, repair with a patch then resew with a sail hook and yarn. It is a royal PITA. You must have been rich to chuck used tubs away.

    I ride road tubeless now.
    BASI Nordic Ski Instructor
    Instagramme
  • It is not difficult... but it is time consuming... budget for 1 hour to fix a puncture once you know what you are doing
    left the forum March 2023
  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,551
    i save them up, then repair in batches of 3-4, over many days

    exact technique is...

    open them up where the repairs are needed, have a glass of wine

    a few days pass

    use some old carcass to patch any bad cuts, have a glass of wine

    a few days pass

    patch the tubes, have a glass of wine

    a few days pass

    sew up, have a glass of wine

    a few days pass

    reglue the basetapes to the tyres, have a glass of wine

    a few days pass

    glue basetape ready for use, have a glass of wine

    i.e. just fit in the next step when there's a bit of spare time, oh, and have a glass of wine
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • petemadoc
    petemadoc Posts: 2,331
    I love tubs

    They're so mysterious
  • andy_wrx
    andy_wrx Posts: 3,396
    See Sheldon/Jobst
    http://sheldonbrown.com/brandt/tubular-repair.html

    Actually a lot easier than this makes it seem
  • DavidJB
    DavidJB Posts: 2,019
    All I do is when I get a puncture I put Tufo extreme sealant into the tub...pump up and go and it's good for another 5/6 months...and even stops me getting new punctures and I don't have to take the tyre off...simples.
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    DavidJB wrote:
    All I do is when I get a puncture I put Tufo extreme sealant into the tub...pump up and go and it's good for another 5/6 months...and even stops me getting new punctures and I don't have to take the tyre off...simples.

    I tried that - the sealant would blow out at anything over about 70psi...
  • Imposter wrote:
    DavidJB wrote:
    All I do is when I get a puncture I put Tufo extreme sealant into the tub...pump up and go and it's good for another 5/6 months...and even stops me getting new punctures and I don't have to take the tyre off...simples.

    I tried that - the sealant would blow out at anything over about 70psi...

    I suppose it also depends on the size of the hole. But yes, sealanet is a temporary repair, which can outlast the life of the tyre or not, but it is still not ideal. Patching the inner tube is the long term solution
    left the forum March 2023
  • sungod wrote:
    i save them up, then repair in batches of 3-4, over many days

    exact technique is...

    open them up where the repairs are needed, have a glass of wine

    a few days pass

    use some old carcass to patch any bad cuts, have a glass of wine

    a few days pass

    patch the tubes, have a glass of wine

    a few days pass

    sew up, have a glass of wine

    a few days pass

    reglue the basetapes to the tyres, have a glass of wine

    a few days pass

    glue basetape ready for use, have a glass of wine

    i.e. just fit in the next step when there's a bit of spare time, oh, and have a glass of wine

    No chance I'll ever repair a tub, I couldn't even finish reading that post!
  • 86inch
    86inch Posts: 161
    I started repairing tubs when I was 12... self taught, its a piece of cake. As long as you use the correct needle and threat, plus a sail palm or decent thimble, its easy.
    Don't let anyone tell you its mysterious or difficult, its neither.
  • markos1963
    markos1963 Posts: 3,724
    I found it really easy. I use dental floss as thread as I find it pulls through easier due to the wax on it.
  • markos1963 wrote:
    I found it really easy. I use dental floss as thread as I find it pulls through easier due to the wax on it.

    I use some Kevlar thread that I got a few years ago as a free sample from Dupont.... 8)
    left the forum March 2023
  • brit66
    brit66 Posts: 350
    Thanks all for the tips. I thought I'd be put off by but it doesn't look like rocket science does it.

    I like the thought of tubular wheels for their strength and lightness... and changing punctured tyres easily. Apart from repairing them, the only other slight downside is carrying a spare as I know they don't exactly pack down small. I suppose a spare and some sealant is the way to go.
  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,551
    brit66 wrote:
    Thanks all for the tips. I thought I'd be put off by but it doesn't look like rocket science does it.

    I like the thought of tubular wheels for their strength and lightness... and changing punctured tyres easily. Apart from repairing them, the only other slight downside is carrying a spare as I know they don't exactly pack down small. I suppose a spare and some sealant is the way to go.

    a light tub folds up almost as small as an inner tube (that's a conti inner tube on the right, credit card size thing in the middle for scale), i carry that plus some tufo extreme, one lezyne matrix tyre lever to help get the old one off, a valve core tool so i can squirt in the sealant

    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • Mr_G
    Mr_G Posts: 53
    I'm not sure I even know what a won tub is never mind how to fix one.
  • Mr_G wrote:
    I'm not sure I even know what a won tub is never mind how to fix one.

    It's one you didn't pay for... they are often broken and need fixing
    left the forum March 2023
  • Mr_G
    Mr_G Posts: 53
    Mr_G wrote:
    I'm not sure I even know what a won tub is never mind how to fix one.

    It's one you didn't pay for... they are often broken and need fixing

    haha! Excellent reply :lol:
  • brit66
    brit66 Posts: 350
    a light tub folds up almost as small as an inner tube (that's a conti inner tube on the right, credit card size thing in the middle for scale), i carry that plus some tufo extreme, one lezyne matrix tyre lever to help get the old one off, a valve core tool so i can squirt in the sealant

    Ooh, I had no idea they could be that small these days. :o Mine were like tractor tyres I seem to remember, although they were cheap and it was 25 years ago. :cry:
  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,551
    brit66 wrote:
    a light tub folds up almost as small as an inner tube (that's a conti inner tube on the right, credit card size thing in the middle for scale), i carry that plus some tufo extreme, one lezyne matrix tyre lever to help get the old one off, a valve core tool so i can squirt in the sealant

    Ooh, I had no idea they could be that small these days. :o Mine were like tractor tyres I seem to remember, although they were cheap and it was 25 years ago. :cry:

    bear in mind this is just a get-me-home tub, not one i'd want to ride on a lot, 'proper' ones like a lovely veloflex carbon don't fold up that small
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • Mr_G wrote:
    I'm not sure I even know what a won tub is never mind how to fix one.
    Isn't it a sort of chibese soup?

    Anyway, I don't care about tubs. I'm still pumped from managing to get the knack of getting clinchers on and off the wheel without tyre levers. For now and possibly another nine minutes I am the god of bike maintenance.
    Is the gorilla tired yet?
  • when you stich up your tubs make sure you don't stich the inner tube in with it!! (done that :oops: )
  • andy_wrx
    andy_wrx Posts: 3,396
    What is your tiny get-me-home tub ?

    The dead cheap ones from Conti or Vittoria are both bulky things.

    The one I use as spare is a bit big too, the race one I had last year and took off as worn and replaced as not being worth the risk it would let me down 23 miles into a 25TT...
  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,551
    it's a tufo 160g one, they have a few different models, some even lighter, this one is skinny but has some protection, downside is you need to pump them up really hard, the rides feels like it's solid rubber

    they used to be available at a reasonable price, but seem to have got much more expensive now, i think i got mine online from germany or maybe france, a used track tub might be an alternative

    i've used it three times so far, it lives a freezer bag to keep it dry, after a year or so a new coat of glue on the basetape is needed to freshen it up so it'll stick ok when mounted
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • petemadoc
    petemadoc Posts: 2,331
    @Sungod what do you use to glue the basetape back onto the tyre? I've just come to repair my first tub today.
  • PeteMadoc wrote:
    @Sungod what do you use to glue the basetape back onto the tyre? I've just come to repair my first tub today.

    I use tubs glue... the latex suspension doesn't seem strong enough
    left the forum March 2023
  • brit66
    brit66 Posts: 350
    Another question...

    What's the best way to avoid sticking your needle through the tube when sewing back up? Can you somehow feel the tube and pinch it out of the way, or is it just a case of being very careful?

    I imagine it'd be incredibly frustrating to do all that work only to realize your ‘repaired’ tube now resembles a colander.
  • markos1963
    markos1963 Posts: 3,724
    brit66 wrote:
    Another question...

    What's the best way to avoid sticking your needle through the tube when sewing back up? Can you somehow feel the tube and pinch it out of the way, or is it just a case of being very careful?

    I imagine it'd be incredibly frustrating to do all that work only to realize your ‘repaired’ tube now resembles a colander.

    If you look at the stitching on the tub you'll see it's done in a way that keeps the needle from going near the tube, just try and copy what the manufacturer has done.
  • pinno
    pinno Posts: 51,347
    For those in the know, I have 25mm rear and 23mm front clinchers with latex inner tubes. They do roll a little like tubs.

    Can anyone give me an idea of what modern tubs are like compared to modern clinchers? I always fancied going back to tubs when my hoops have bitten the dust. Campag also do a two way fit for not much more than the extortionate price they charge for their exquisite wheels and it would be an option that I would take with enough info.
    Cheers.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • Two Way fit is for tubeless clinchers, not tubulars. Very different kettle of fish.
  • DavidJB
    DavidJB Posts: 2,019
    Imposter wrote:
    DavidJB wrote:
    All I do is when I get a puncture I put Tufo extreme sealant into the tub...pump up and go and it's good for another 5/6 months...and even stops me getting new punctures and I don't have to take the tyre off...simples.

    I tried that - the sealant would blow out at anything over about 70psi...

    The hole is obviously massive then...I've tun 3 tubs with sealant now for months @ 120PSI (racing on them)