I bought a MTB today!

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Comments

  • ddraver
    ddraver Posts: 26,408
    5% you can get your feet out easier, 95% style/bragging rights

    They re are go for your skills, Clipless pedals cover a lot of sins...
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • Daz555
    Daz555 Posts: 3,976
    Long fingered gloves - better grip in the wet, protection from branches/nettles, protection in a crash. I prefer to wear my long fingered gloves on my road bike as well.

    Camelbak - bottles fall off, get covered in fox crap, and make your bike heavier than it needs to be - you want your bike light and nimble and free to move beneath you, not weighed down with 1.5kg of sloshing water. The only thing sloshing about should be your beer gut. Camelbak also means you can drink whilst still holding on with both hands.

    Bar ends? They were big in the 90s.
    You only need two tools: WD40 and Duck Tape.
    If it doesn't move and should, use the WD40.
    If it shouldn't move and does, use the tape.
  • davep1
    davep1 Posts: 836
    ddraver wrote:
    Would it be rude to suggest you need a pair of shorts that fit you properly?

    Er, yes, but hey this is Bikeradar, I expected as much! My lycra shorts fit me perfectly, so I wear them whatever bike I am riding...

    The fact that 99% of recreational MTBers use long fingered gloves would suggest you may also be mistaken there too...

    99%? It isn't that high a percentage round here. All for long-fingered gloves when it is cold, but I prefer my mitts for as long as I can get away with it. Better control etc in most conditions, and I try to avoid catching the undergrowth as far as possible.
  • davep1
    davep1 Posts: 836
    Daz555 wrote:
    Long fingered gloves - better grip in the wet, protection from branches/nettles, protection in a crash. I prefer to wear my long fingered gloves on my road bike as well.

    Camelbak - bottles fall off, get covered in fox crap, and make your bike heavier than it needs to be - you want your bike light and nimble and free to move beneath you, not weighed down with 1.5kg of sloshing water. The only thing sloshing about should be your beer gut. Camelbak also means you can drink whilst still holding on with both hands.

    Bar ends? They were big in the 90s.
    I love mine, apart from anything else they give you a different place to put your hands.

    And my bottle is 750 ml, so 750 grams (I think if my school physics is right). You and your bike are a system, so not sure if it matters that much where the liquid is; especially as I always drink all of mine. I like to be free to move around on the bike, not weighed down with a pack sloshing liquid and tools and other crap about, and making me sweat in a strange place.
  • ddraver
    ddraver Posts: 26,408
    DaveP1 wrote:
    ddraver wrote:
    Would it be rude to suggest you need a pair of shorts that fit you properly?

    Er, yes, but hey this is Bikeradar, I expected as much! My lycra shorts fit me perfectly, so I wear them whatever bike I am riding...

    The fact that 99% of recreational MTBers use long fingered gloves would suggest you may also be mistaken there too...

    99%? It isn't that high a percentage round here. All for long-fingered gloves when it is cold, but I prefer my mitts for as long as I can get away with it. Better control etc in most conditions, and I try to avoid catching the undergrowth as far as possible.

    Google 661 Raji's for the summer
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • kajjal
    kajjal Posts: 3,380
    DaveP1 wrote:
    ddraver wrote:
    Would it be rude to suggest you need a pair of shorts that fit you properly?

    Er, yes, but hey this is Bikeradar, I expected as much! My lycra shorts fit me perfectly, so I wear them whatever bike I am riding...

    The fact that 99% of recreational MTBers use long fingered gloves would suggest you may also be mistaken there too...

    99%? It isn't that high a percentage round here. All for long-fingered gloves when it is cold, but I prefer my mitts for as long as I can get away with it. Better control etc in most conditions, and I try to avoid catching the undergrowth as far as possible.

    Exactly the same, must be an old Skool 1990's mountain biking thing :)

    Use them on my road bike as well. Give it five years and the marketing machine will have everyone back in mitts again :wink:
  • diy
    diy Posts: 6,473
    Do 29ers still carry the dad's bike label? I thought the manufacturers had given up trying to convince us that we had a problem rolling over bumps on 26ers and decided that 27.5" is the best of all worlds.

    I tend to wear baggies for trail riding and a mix of road bike and mtb bike or XC/enduro. Lycra is great when its a dry flinty track, but you'll wreck your bibs in proper mud.
  • ddraver
    ddraver Posts: 26,408
    DaveP1 wrote:
    Daz555 wrote:
    Long fingered gloves - better grip in the wet, protection from branches/nettles, protection in a crash. I prefer to wear my long fingered gloves on my road bike as well.

    Camelbak - bottles fall off, get covered in fox crap, and make your bike heavier than it needs to be - you want your bike light and nimble and free to move beneath you, not weighed down with 1.5kg of sloshing water. The only thing sloshing about should be your beer gut. Camelbak also means you can drink whilst still holding on with both hands.

    Bar ends? They were big in the 90s.
    I love mine, apart from anything else they give you a different place to put your hands.

    And my bottle is 750 ml, so 750 grams (I think if my school physics is right). You and your bike are a system, so not sure if it matters that much where the liquid is; especially as I always drink all of mine. I like to be free to move around on the bike, not weighed down with a pack sloshing liquid and tools and other crap about, and making me sweat in a strange place.

    It's more about moving the bike around underneath you when descending or traversing (and I suppose a bit of throwing it over obstacles on climbs). Youre right that it makes no difference on a long flat road/fireroad climb
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver