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is this a full out race or a comfort/sportive

richie1973richie1973 Posts: 99
edited July 2013 in Road buying advice
hi,
i am looking at a new bike, i want to upgrade but dont want to loose comfort. my current bike is very comfy to me, i have done many 60 to 70 mile rides without any problems. (do my first century this sat). do i look at sportive bikes or flat out race? what is mine? sorry to sound uninformed but i have only just staretd road biking. a bike i have seen is described as full race geo, but is full carbon. i just worry that i might loose my comfort.
(my wife is now entering the road sene, she is having my gt)
thanks.

Posts

  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,767
    in case you've forgotten, we've already had this discussion...

    viewtopic.php?f=40042&t=12933348&p=18453787#p18453787
  • richie1973richie1973 Posts: 99
    Imposter wrote:
    in case you've forgotten, we've already had this discussion...

    viewtopic.php?f=40042&t=12933348&p=18453787#p18453787


    Thank you for the reminder, but no! i didnt forget. i have been out around my lbs and got confused with sportive/enderance Vs full out race. that is my question.
    i have not asked that question before, did you get me confused with another poster? (other post was simelar but we have not "had this discussion"
    like i say, i am new(ish) to road biking, if people would like to help then i thank them, if they have nothing to help me in my question then why post?
    i am looking to spend a good amount of money on a new bike, this in turn brings wealth to this sport as i guesss others could be in the same boat as me given the rise in this sport in our country. it would be helpfull to have good advice. it can only be a good thing that many are now hitting the roads with a new bike. (unless your a vehicle driver who forgets to use mirrors) :lol:
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,767
    Well, just in case you forgot the replies from the last thread (which you appear to have done) - geometry and frame material contribute very little towards 'comfort'. Fit and tyre choice/pressure will make up about 90% of how comfortable the bike feels.
  • richie1973richie1973 Posts: 99
    Imposter wrote:
    Well, just in case you forgot the replies from the last thread (which you appear to have done) - geometry and frame material contribute very little towards 'comfort'. Fit and tyre choice/pressure will make up about 90% of how comfortable the bike feels.

    thanks, good feeback. i guess wheels come into that too? i just dont want to buy a bike and find i get aches here and there. i am 40 years old, still run alot and keep fit but i aint 20 any more :( i am trying to test ride some but lbs dont offer this much in my area, the only test ride i have got is a giant advanced tcr 1 later in the week.
  • GGBikerGGBiker Posts: 450
    I know plenty of riders in their 8th decade riding proper race bikes.

    This sportive geometry nonsense is marketing to pander towards people who feel a need for being cosseted, they might as well ride a trike or a penny farthing.

    Being aerodynamic and riding faster with less effort is much more rewarding in my experience, a race bike is not uncomfortable if set up to fit you.
  • mfinmfin Posts: 6,726
    Right, let's get this clear. Sportive geometry is mainly down to a trend in taller headtubes. If you look at the photo of the bike the guy has a very conservative saddle to bar drop. The bike is irrelevant, what is relevant is some people can not get their saddle to bar drop to measure enough on some sportive geometry bikes, so the trend to taller headtubes doesn't suit some people.

    Forget the bike. Work out your saddle height, your saddle to bar distance, your saddle to bar drop... and THEN work out if this translates onto the bike you are looking at buying. Only buy a bike when you know these measurements will work on the bike you are buying. That's it.

    You have got to know your 'fit', never do it the other way around thinking 'is this bike my size', know your position, or if you don't, go for a bike fit, a proper one, then be prepared for this to change a bit over time. Use someone reputable. ...if you know you're bike fit without this, then you'd never be mentioning 'sportive geometry'.
  • richie1973richie1973 Posts: 99
    great advice guys, thanks.
    getting a proper fit when i pick up the tcr for test ride.
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