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Garmin 800 vs 810

adowling92adowling92 Posts: 225
edited July 2013 in Road buying advice
Which one?
And are they worth the money?
Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of a bike ride. --John F. Kennedy

Posts

  • grim168grim168 Posts: 482
    Watches with interest. About to get an 800 but not sure which map pack to go for. Os maps seem more use so long as i can navigate a road ride too.
  • adowling92adowling92 Posts: 225
    I'd need the navigation bundle then?
    Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of a bike ride. --John F. Kennedy
  • junglist_mattyjunglist_matty Posts: 1,728
    edge 500 is the best, the navigation works fine if you split a long ride into 30mile segments, for rides longer than 30miles the line dissapears, but I've followed plenty of routes
  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 16,015
    edge 500 is the best, the navigation works fine if you split a long ride into 30mile segments, for rides longer than 30miles the line dissapears, but I've followed plenty of routes

    Better off with a Bryton for that sort of unit then - the breadcrumb navigation works fine for all distances on those though I'm amazed if Garmin haven't fixed that problem yet - it's pretty significant.
    Faster than a tent.......
  • adowling92adowling92 Posts: 225
    edge 500 is the best, the navigation works fine if you split a long ride into 30mile segments, for rides longer than 30miles the line dissapears, but I've followed plenty of routes

    Edge 500 doesn't have maps?
    Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of a bike ride. --John F. Kennedy
  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 16,015
    adowling92 wrote:
    edge 500 is the best, the navigation works fine if you split a long ride into 30mile segments, for rides longer than 30miles the line dissapears, but I've followed plenty of routes

    Edge 500 doesn't have maps?

    Edge 500, 200 and Bryton 35 and 40 have breadcrumb trail navigation. You plot a route, download it to the unit and it gives you a line to follow. No maps so if there is a diversion or you decide you've had enough and want to go home early, the unit won't help. But otherwise, it does what the fully mapped units do but more compactly.
    Faster than a tent.......
  • adowling92adowling92 Posts: 225
    Rolf F wrote:
    adowling92 wrote:
    edge 500 is the best, the navigation works fine if you split a long ride into 30mile segments, for rides longer than 30miles the line dissapears, but I've followed plenty of routes

    Edge 500 doesn't have maps?

    Edge 500, 200 and Bryton 35 and 40 have breadcrumb trail navigation. You plot a route, download it to the unit and it gives you a line to follow. No maps so if there is a diversion or you decide you've had enough and want to go home early, the unit won't help. But otherwise, it does what the fully mapped units do but more compactly.

    Will have to try this out! What website do i use to plan a route?
    Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of a bike ride. --John F. Kennedy
  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 16,015
    adowling92 wrote:
    Rolf F wrote:
    adowling92 wrote:
    edge 500 is the best, the navigation works fine if you split a long ride into 30mile segments, for rides longer than 30miles the line dissapears, but I've followed plenty of routes

    Edge 500 doesn't have maps?

    Edge 500, 200 and Bryton 35 and 40 have breadcrumb trail navigation. You plot a route, download it to the unit and it gives you a line to follow. No maps so if there is a diversion or you decide you've had enough and want to go home early, the unit won't help. But otherwise, it does what the fully mapped units do but more compactly.

    Will have to try this out! What website do i use to plan a route?

    All sorts - Bryton and Garmin both have their own pages and there are others like Bikeroutetoaster and Bikely that also do the job - anything that allows you to save a gpx file which you then download to the unit. Process is the same whether the unit has mapping or just breadcrumb trails.
    Faster than a tent.......
  • StillGoingStillGoing Posts: 5,207
    800 or 810 are both good. If you want that little bit more, then the 810 has it with the Livetrack feature and with rides being automatically uploaded to Garmin Connect when you've finished, there's no need to plug it in to a PC. If like me, you do the odd bit of hill walking, then the devices can also be used as hand held navigators should you ever need it. A 510 or anything else that doesn't have maps doesn't do that.
    I ride a bike. Doesn't make me green or a tree hugger. I drive a car too.
  • poppitpoppit Posts: 926
    Got an 810, never had a 800. Seems to work ok but need an A level in Garmin, is there anywhere I can do the course!!!! :shock:
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  • simonjsimonj Posts: 346
    Had an 800 was great loved it, bought an 810, was as good as the 800 plus bells and whistles. For me the user interface was better, screen still small compared with car satnav, but the instant upload and instant download of courses to the 810 for me I love. May not be the killer extra for everyone, but for me the 800 was great, the 810 even better. :D
  • freezing77freezing77 Posts: 731
    poppit wrote:
    Got an 810, never had a 800. Seems to work ok but need an A level in Garmin, is there anywhere I can do the course!!!! :shock:

    http://www.meetup.com/RichmondPark/events/98268482/ :)
  • StillGoingStillGoing Posts: 5,207
    poppit wrote:
    Got an 810, never had a 800. Seems to work ok but need an A level in Garmin, is there anywhere I can do the course!!!! :shock:

    In simple terms here.

    http://www.forgot.co.uk/edge-800/
    I ride a bike. Doesn't make me green or a tree hugger. I drive a car too.
  • wongataawongataa Posts: 990
    grim168 wrote:
    Watches with interest. About to get an 800 but not sure which map pack to go for. Os maps seem more use so long as i can navigate a road ride too.
    Don't get one with maps. Use free OSM maps based such as the ones from TalkyToaster.
  • Bar ShakerBar Shaker Posts: 2,313
    Get the 800, get it with the maps and get the HRM and Cadence sensors with it. Prices are around £250-260 now and for that it is a no brainer.

    You can save £25 and download maps off the internet but the Garmin maps cover the whole of Europe in very good detail and there are no issues with using turn-by-turn nav, go-to functions, memory card size, downloading different countries etc.

    If you have the budget, the 810 with wifi is even nicer but is a lot more expensive.

    I just can't see the point of the 500 or 510 unless you don't intend to use planned routes. And if you don't, any GPS, even a phone or watch one, will record short rides for a Strava upload.

    My 800 is one of my favourite bits of tech.
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  • grim168grim168 Posts: 482
    I can't find them anywhere near that price. Cheapest is £359 with os maps at leisure lakes.
  • drlodgedrlodge Posts: 4,826
    There have been reports of the 810 being buggy and unreliable. A fellow club rider got an 810 and its been a pain in the ar$e. On Sunday's ride it didn't record the first half despite being turned on.

    I have the 800 bundle with UK maps and premium HRM, and its worked a treat so far. Cost me £360 from Evans, who priced matched Winstanley bikes, and I would expect them to be much cheaper now.
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  • Bar ShakerBar Shaker Posts: 2,313
    edited July 2013
    grim168 wrote:
    I can't find them anywhere near that price. Cheapest is £359 with os maps at leisure lakes.

    Hmm, you are right. Mine was much cheaper last year. It is available with Garmin's base maps but I am not sure how these compare.

    Garmin 800 with maps and performance bundle for £265 on Amazon

    http://www.satnav-discounts.co.uk/outdo ... ge-800.htm

    On that basis, I would download maps from talkytoaster.

    Why have these become much more expensive with full mapping?
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  • grim168grim168 Posts: 482
    Cheers Bar, but thats without maps. Well it has base map but not os or the full garmin europe maps.
  • Bar ShakerBar Shaker Posts: 2,313
    Yep, I didn't see your post and edited mine to say the same. These units were almost £100 cheaper last year.
    Boardman Elite SLR 9.2S
    Boardman FS Pro
  • grim168grim168 Posts: 482
    I thought there would be deals on an 800 with the 810 out now. Just looking at mapping and trying to decide whats best. I'm edging (geddit) towards the os map so I can use it for mtbing and fell walking and will download open source for more accurate road maps.
  • dork_knightdork_knight Posts: 405
    You could try the following link at Hantec and Flubit to see how much they can bring it down by:

    http://www.handtec.co.uk/garmin-edge-80 ... 99-31.html

    http://www.flubit.com/

    It took them a week but they quoted £377 for the Garmin Edge 810 Performance & Navigation Bundle last weekend, unfortunately I had already purchased it by that point as they took so long to get back with the quote.
    The path of my life is strewn with cowpats from the devil's own satanic herd.
  • SoSimpleSoSimple Posts: 301
    I'd think twice before buying either the 800 or 810 and ask yourself whether you'll really use the mapping function or are you paying a fortune for a cycle computer that populates Strava or Mapmyride.

    On a recent charity bike ride through France one of the guys had a Garmin 800 and tried to navigate us. What a total disaster! The chip in the Garmin is so slow that we took so many wrong turns because we'd missed the next turn by the time it lined up with the route. Frustrating would be an understatement.

    I've also used it on a couple of sportives but the signposting was so good I didn't really need it.

    Before 800/810 owners start getting steam coming out of their ears, I've also got the 800 and love it...to track my training. I've also got a Garmin sat nav for my car and while its better, you simply cannot rely on either completely, especially on a bike because in the car you can do a u turn but when you've descended a killer hill in error on your bike you'll want to smash the Garmin into pieces.

    As for the 800 v the 810, I really wanted the 810 for the live tracking but truth is you still need a phone with you to make it work and if you are navigating down an obscure road in the back of beyond, chances are you won't have a phone signal either!

    The Bluetooth uploading is pretty nifty and well worthwhile but on the basis to can't charge it by Bluetooth you'll still be plugging it in anyway. Someone has already mentioned a website called DCRainmaker which gives a brilliant impartial review.

    I got mine for just over £250 on a Wiggle price match which included heart rate monitor and cadence so it's worth shopping around. Buying again?.....I'd think about a Garmin 200 for less than £100
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