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MAMIL Comfortable Rides?

kitenskikitenski Posts: 218
edited June 2013 in Road buying advice
Evening all,

Looking for a more comfortable ride for longer distances. I have a 3 year old Allez which is ok, but my back get's pretty stiff on longer rides (I do core work in the gym which does help). I'm 46 and not getting any younger, but keen to bike some longer distances, up to 100 miles by the end of this summer.

Was considering upgrading the groupset on the Allez, but latest thoughts are to but some mud guards on it for a winter shorter distance ride and get something new and shiny.

I'm test riding the Trek Domane 4.5 on Monday (budget prob £1500)

What other bikes should I put on the shortlist?

Cheers,

Greg

Posts

  • GrillGrill Posts: 5,610
    If your back is giving you trouble it's likely that you need more upright geometry and something like a Domane isn't really going to address the issue. Can you add more spacers or flip the stem?
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • kitenskikitenski Posts: 218
    stem is already flipped.......it only seems stiff on longer rides, so was thinking it was the jolting, hence looking at tthe Domane.....
  • GrillGrill Posts: 5,610
    What tyres are you running at what pressure?
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • kitenskikitenski Posts: 218
    Grill wrote:
    What tyres are you running at what pressure?

    Just switched to Schwalbe Ultremo 700 x 23c, running 120psi
  • GrillGrill Posts: 5,610
    That's your problem. Run 25c at 100psi or less. How much do you weigh?
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • plowmarplowmar Posts: 1,032
    Oooh!, that could be areason. I'm currently running Conti 4000's 100 front and 110 rear and they work for me no back pain at all but to be fair I didn't suffer that much with it, and you've got a way to go to catch me on age.

    Serious riding only 7/8 years.
  • kitenskikitenski Posts: 218
    Grill wrote:
    That's your problem. Run 25c at 100psi or less. How much do you weigh?

    weigh 79kg currently, could I run my 23s at 100psi??
  • smidsysmidsy Posts: 5,273
    23's need to run higher than 25's, that is why 25's are often suggested as a better option.
    Yellow is the new Black.
  • GrillGrill Posts: 5,610
    kitenski wrote:
    Grill wrote:
    That's your problem. Run 25c at 100psi or less. How much do you weigh?

    weigh 79kg currently, could I run my 23s at 100psi??

    Yes but you run a greater risk of a pinch flat. It's certainly worth a try, just be sure to bring spare tubes.
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • kitenskikitenski Posts: 218
    Grill wrote:
    kitenski wrote:
    Grill wrote:
    That's your problem. Run 25c at 100psi or less. How much do you weigh?
    weigh 79kg currently, could I run my 23s at 100psi??
    Yes but you run a greater risk of a pinch flat. It's certainly worth a try, just be sure to bring spare tubes.

    Maybe I'll try 110psi tomorrow then, hoping to do a 54 miler.....
  • mfinmfin Posts: 6,724
    kitenski wrote:
    Grill wrote:
    That's your problem. Run 25c at 100psi or less. How much do you weigh?

    weigh 79kg currently, could I run my 23s at 100psi??

    Easily. In fact I'd say for your weight you should be trying 90psi front and rear, something like that, you could go as low as 80 with no problems.

    100psi is still too high for comfort, try it, then knock it down to 90psi, you'll see, well you should be able to tell the road surface buzz starts to disappear.

    120psi for 79kgs isn't just 'high', it's ridiculous.
  • No SweatNo Sweat Posts: 103
    Here's a useful website 'tire' pressure calculator.

    As you (probably) put more weight over the rear wheel than the front. the pressures should be higher in the rear...for a performance road bike a 45:55 split is usually about right, although you can check it with scales (and an excellent sense of balance).

    This calculator is based on an assumption that a 15% tire compression under load is 'ideal' - whilst this is debatable, it is a useful starting point. I have used the results and have a more comfortable ride, and haven't (yet) pinch flatted.

    http://www.dorkypantsr.us/bike-tire-pre ... lator.html
  • Daz555Daz555 Posts: 4,040
    +1 for not going crazy with the pressures. As low as possible without pinch flats is my aim. I'm 89kg and ride with 80psi front and 90 psi rear (ish - I don't check that often) on a 23 tyre.

    As for back pain. I'm no spring chicken either and I can suffer from lower back pain if I'm not careful. The cause of mine on the bike is gripping the bars too tight when climbing which makes me pull on the bars placing strain on my lower back. I'm now careful to keep my fingers loose when the road starts to point upwards and always try to feel positive pressure on the palms of my hands. This stops my lower back pain.

    I then play football on a Sunday and censored it all up again. :(:mrgreen:
    You only need two tools: WD40 and Duck Tape.
    If it doesn't move and should, use the WD40.
    If it shouldn't move and does, use the tape.
  • dazbodazbo Posts: 59
    If you've not had one i'd recommend getting a proper fit if you having issues. I recently had a retul and was pretty impressed. I was suggested that frames with a less aggressive geometry suit me better - so things like Giant Defy, Cervelo R3, or Ridley Orion / Helium.

    The retul looks pricey but compared to a new bike its a no brainer!
  • StillGoingStillGoing Posts: 5,207
    dazbo wrote:
    If you've not had one i'd recommend getting a proper fit if you having issues. I recently had a retul and was pretty impressed. I was suggested that frames with a less aggressive geometry suit me better - so things like Giant Defy, Cervelo R3, or Ridley Orion / Helium.

    The retul looks pricey but compared to a new bike its a no brainer!

    I'd certainly go down the proper fitting route. Go somewhere that will assess your current bike to gauge just how far out you are with fitment. They can then advise you of the correct frame size and geometry for you. Sometimes what we think is best isn't. For instance I could never ride in the drops for long finding it too uncomfortable. Naturally I assumed the bars needed raising. Wrong. A proper fitting session with Bike Dynamics saw the bars lowered and the seat raised and pushed back. I can now ride on the drops for long periods without discomfort.
    I ride a bike. Doesn't make me green or a tree hugger. I drive a car too.
  • kitenskikitenski Posts: 218
    edited June 2013
    cheers all, off to try out some lower pressure after the Lions game... however this chart seems to suggest I should be running 116 PSI for 23 tyres??

    http://www.michelinbicycletire.com/mich ... ssure.view

    But nobody has remembered Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1
  • danowatdanowat Posts: 2,877
    Stretching could help, tight hamstrings, glutes and hip flexors can attribute to lower back issues.
  • luv2rideluv2ride Posts: 2,362
    I'd echo what philthy3 said re proper bike fit, I had the same outcome after visiting BikeScience in Bristol. Dropped the bar down right down on my Roubaix, seat height stayed the same but saddle was put back a couple of notches. Spent loads of time getting my knees tracking properly which has made a massive difference for me. Now able to ride longer in comfort, often on the drops as well.

    Just had a new frame built up, have managed to emulate the bike ft measurements from the Roubaix and have now done two rides on the new steed in sublime comfort. I also now run 25mm tyres @ 90 psi which even makes my alu Tifosi CK7 feel plush on rubbish road surfaces. Get some....
    Scott Solace 10 disc - Kinesis Crosslight Pro6 disc - Scott CR1 SL - Pinnacle Arkose X 650b - Pinnacle Arkose 1x11 "monster cross" - Specialized Singlecross...& an Ernie Ball Musicman Stingray 4 string...
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