Building a light wheel with powertap hub

GGBiker
GGBiker Posts: 450
edited March 2013 in Road buying advice
Just looking for opinions.... Is it possible to build a lightweight reliable "do it all" rear wheel with a powertap pro hub (weighs 446g)? Would need to be towards the budget end, for training and racing. Ideally would like the wheel to come at under 900g exc skewer.

I weigh 67kg and ride on varied roads but take care to avoid potholes etc when possible. Average 60-100 miles per week on the road + indoor sessions 1-2 hrs weekly.

Any advice appreciated

Comments

  • BikeSwan
    BikeSwan Posts: 260
    Maybe "H Plus Son Archetype" rims with "Sapim CX-Ray" Spokes? Choose a high spoke count and those wheels would last longer than any rider would need them to.
  • cycleclinic
    cycleclinic Posts: 6,865
    Well an DT Swiss RR415 is 415g and that is a light rim. The only lighter rims ot there are Kinlin XR200 or Stans 340 both are 385g. So the answer is no it is not possible to build a 900g power tap.

    The DT RR415 28H with Sapim Lasers could suit but this will be (with allow nipples) 1000g.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • napoleond
    napoleond Posts: 5,992
    I got as light as I could with an IRD Cadence Road rim (390g) and CX Rays, it was 1080g Could have used alloy nipples but, well, they would have been alloy nipples. It was a fantastic build though! (courtesy of Derek at Wheelsmith)
    Insta: ATEnduranceCoaching
    ABCC Cycling Coach
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,301
    GGBiker wrote:
    Just looking for opinions.... Is it possible to build a lightweight reliable "do it all" rear wheel with a powertap pro hub (weighs 446g)? Would need to be towards the budget end, for training and racing. Ideally would like the wheel to come at under 900g exc skewer.

    I weigh 67kg and ride on varied roads but take care to avoid potholes etc when possible. Average 60-100 miles per week on the road + indoor sessions 1-2 hrs weekly.

    Any advice appreciated

    1 Kg is the lowest possible and it will probably be a wheel not worth riding. Building a 24 H powertap on an A 23 rim, which is a nice do it all one, will bring you towards 1100, a bit less if you want to waste a bit of money on Sapim CX Ray spokes
    left the forum March 2023
  • GGBiker
    GGBiker Posts: 450
    Thanks all, would 1100g or thereabouts be reasonable to race on given that must of the excess weight is at the hub - ie would it accelerate nicely despite the high overall weight?
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,301
    GGBiker wrote:
    Thanks all, would 1100g or thereabouts be reasonable to race on given that must have the excess weight is at the hub - ie would it accelerate nicely despite the high overall weight?

    Yes, the weight of your inner hub is pretty much irrelevant... And if you race you definitively want them stiff, so you need a decent rim, rather than one made of rubber
    left the forum March 2023
  • amaferanga
    amaferanga Posts: 6,789
    You'll only notice the weight of the hub when you lift the bike as it'll be noticeably heavier at the back. It'll be fine for racing with - I used a Pro+ for training and racing for a couple of years. My only issues with PowerTaps are the fact that you're tied to a single wheel and the fact that when the torque tube dies it'll cost nearly £400 to replace.

    Have you considered a Power2max crank-based power meter instead? It'll cost a bit more than the PowerTap, but worth a look if you can stretch your budget a little.
    More problems but still living....
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,301
    amaferanga wrote:
    You'll only notice the weight of the hub when you lift the bike as it'll be noticeably heavier at the back. It'll be fine for racing with - I used a Pro+ for training and racing for a couple of years. My only issues with PowerTaps are the fact that you're tied to a single wheel and the fact that when the torque tube dies it'll cost nearly £400 to replace.

    Have you considered a Power2max crank-based power meter instead? It'll cost a bit more than the PowerTap, but worth a look if you can stretch your budget a little.

    Some might argue the advantage of Power Tap is in testing power on more than one bike without having to strip off the bottom bracket etc...
    In principle I agree with you, but just because I am fully tooled-up and don't mind spannering
    left the forum March 2023
  • amaferanga
    amaferanga Posts: 6,789
    Some might argue the advantage of Power Tap is in testing power on more than one bike without having to strip off the bottom bracket etc...
    In principle I agree with you, but just because I am fully tooled-up and don't mind spannering

    Mine is gxp so all it takes is a single allen key to switch the crank between bikes. 2 minute job. No need to mess around with the bottom bracket.
    More problems but still living....
  • napoleond
    napoleond Posts: 5,992
    I raced with mine on an Open Pro and straight gauge spokes, much heavier than the 1080 my recent build was. Never felt it held me back.
    Insta: ATEnduranceCoaching
    ABCC Cycling Coach
  • GGBiker
    GGBiker Posts: 450
    Thanks for input, I would see the ability to move the rear wheel between different bikes as an advantage.
  • amaferanga
    amaferanga Posts: 6,789
    GGBiker wrote:
    Thanks for input, I would see the ability to move the rear wheel between different bikes as an advantage.

    As above, it's literally a 2min job to swap a crank if you have the same bottom bracket types on your bikes so the swapability advantage of the PowerTap is myth.
    More problems but still living....
  • GGBiker
    GGBiker Posts: 450
    Not easier than swapping a wheel IMO, other concerns would be it is much more expensive and it has had poor reviews (although I hear the issue has been resolved with a built in thermometer?).
  • amaferanga
    amaferanga Posts: 6,789
    GGBiker wrote:
    Not easier than swapping a wheel IMO, other concerns would be it is much more expensive and it has had poor reviews (although I hear the issue has been resolved with a built in thermometer?).

    I haven't heard any complaints since the update in September last year. With a PowerTap you need to factor in the cost of a new torque tube every few years - £400. It's about £700 for a SRAM S900 P2max if you have the crank already. If you're patient you can pick up a good used crank for ~£80. That's not much more than it'd cost to have PowerTap built up with a matching front wheel.

    Plus P2M offer a crash replacement policy with a new one costing only ~£300 (i.e. less than a new torque tube for a PowerTap).

    I'm not saying PowerTaps are all bad, but having owned a PowerTap and a P2max, the P2max is just better (for me anyway) and I swap it between bikes on a weekly basis. Yeah it takes longer than swapping a wheel, but it's a very simple job.
    More problems but still living....