Brake shoes - does it make a difference?

Anonymous
Anonymous Posts: 79,667
edited February 2013 in Road buying advice
Silly question I know, but I have been using brake pads which are built into the shoes, but the pads themselves can't be separated (and therefore replaced).

I want to change to shoes which have replaceable pads. Now I didn't imagine there would be a scrap of difference from one to the other, but they seem to range in price from about 7 to 25 quid for just a pair of shoes with built in pads....

Quite need to get a set tonight, so if a good all rounder (ideally which will fit shimano DA pads) can be recommended which is available from Evans or Cycle Surgery, that would be appreciated. I was thinking just to go 105/Ultegra

Thanks

Comments

  • Brake pads make a huge difference to braking performance. Swiss Stop and Kool Stop are considered to be the best on the market by many.
    I have only two things to say to that; Bo***cks
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    I know that, but I'm looking for brake shoes....
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    Confused.... Are you looking for cartridges with pads, cartridges without pads or something else.

    If you need cartridges, the best bet is probably to get a set of Barradine pads from Ribble for about £7 a pair or whatever, then get a set of Swisstop or Koolstop pads. Save the Barradine pads for the rear wheel and the expensive ones for the front. No point I can see spending over £20 for a single pair of Swisstop pads and cartridges.
    Faster than a tent.......
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    I have the brakes, I have a set of pads, I just don't have the bit which holds the pads. Up until now I have been using a single pad/cartridge/shoe whatever so you chuck the whole thing away when the pad is worn out.

    I think I am looking for cartridges without pads (unless I can get some good cartridges with pads). My question is does the 'cartridge' if that is the right word, make a difference as there are big price differences if you look on wiggle from 7 to 22 quid across the range of shimano ones.
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    coriordan wrote:
    I have the brakes, I have a set of pads, I just don't have the bit which holds the pads. Up until now I have been using a single pad/cartridge/shoe whatever so you chuck the whole thing away when the pad is worn out.

    I think I am looking for cartridges without pads (unless I can get some good cartridges with pads). My question is does the 'cartridge' if that is the right word, make a difference as there are big price differences if you look on wiggle from 7 to 22 quid across the range of shimano ones.

    I think it makes zero difference - they all ensure even pressure of the pads on the rims and that's it. The Swisstop ones have a cut out to save weight but that's the only difference I can see. As the rear contributes little braking benefit, I tend to think that getting the really cheap ones and saving those pads for the back is the best way of saving money and waste. If you can get cartridges without the pads, they'll be silly expensive I expect compared to the both.
    Faster than a tent.......
  • passout
    passout Posts: 4,425
    Not sure if longevity varies but I don't think that it makes any difference in terms of performance. Main thing is that the pads fit the shoes.
    'Happiness serves hardly any other purpose than to make unhappiness possible' Marcel Proust.
  • I moved from tiagra level brake pads (which are not cartridge type) to Fibrax cartridge pads as I wanted better braking and the tiagra ones were digging out bits of my rim. I found that the braking had improved but the digging continued so I ended up buying some Swissstop green pads which fitted straight into the fibrax shoes. I am not sure if the braking would have been better if i had moved straight to Swissstop branded cartridge pads but I would be surprised if I could really tell the difference. The important things IMHO are the material the pads are made of and the ability of the shoes to evenly press the pad on the rim.
  • pkripper
    pkripper Posts: 652
    Right, you've got the DA pads already (from your previous thread) - just buy whichever pad holders / cartridges that are within your budget and take shimano blocks. There's bugger all difference between them apart from maybe a bit of weight / colour / quality. Functionally, they'll work. The biggest gains are in the pad material itself, and even then, that's mostly performance in the wet.

    FWIW, all my bikes have swisstop greens.