New Cassette

benthiss
benthiss Posts: 6
edited February 2013 in Road buying advice
Hey all, I'm new to road biking and have had my first road bike for about a month now. I'm finding the gearing on it a bit low though - so am having to use the higher gears or peddling faster than my friends who have also just started. So was wondering if I would benefit from a new cassette.

I currently have a 50/34 chainset with a 14/28 7 speed cassette, so would I get much benefit from a 11/28 tooth cassette such as this one: http://www.evanscycles.com/products/shi ... e-ec029802

The spacings on the 2 cassettes are:
Current : 14 16 18 20 22 24 28
Simano HG42 : 11 13 15 18 21 24 28

Would there be much difference between the two?
Thanks

Comments

  • smidsy
    smidsy Posts: 5,273
    If you are saying that 50/14 is still leaving you wanting more then the 11 will certainly give you that.

    If you are saying its too hard then no, the 11 makes it harder.
    Yellow is the new Black.
  • sorry I wasn't clear, I'm finding that I run out of gears quickly, particularly on the smaller chainring
  • benthiss wrote:
    sorry I wasn't clear, I'm finding that I run out of gears quickly, particularly on the smaller chainring

    Er, are we talking about cross chaining? ie, using the 34 chainring and the 14t cog? Naughty boy :wink:
    CAAD9
    Kona Jake the Snake
    Merlin Malt 4
  • should you not do that?

    how far down the rear cassette can you go then in the 36 tooth chainring?
  • Usually never go in "big ring and big cog - small ring and small cog". The drive is most efficient in the central cassette area. What happens is the chain is pulled across the cogs on both the chainring and cassette and wears out faster. You also lose nearly 5% energy I believe.
    CAAD9
    Kona Jake the Snake
    Merlin Malt 4
  • ah fair enough, shall avoid that in future then
  • Even if you adopt the 'not crossing the chain' approach (which I agree you should, for the reasons stated above), on the small chainring you could still easily be looking at going from 18t to 15t with the new cassette, so there's still a benefit to be had, you just need to move to the big chainring before you get down to the 11t and possibly the 13t.
    Still trying to convince the missus of the n+1 rule...!
  • Mad_Malx
    Mad_Malx Posts: 5,105
    Definately worth going for a higher (smaller tooth) cassette. Probably best with a 12-whatever lowest (bigger tooth) you need until cassette until you are really strong. Practice increasing your cadence if you think you are running out on a 50front 12back, you should be doing about 35mph at 100rpm.
    11-50 is quite a high gear, and you will only use it on long clear downslope, or while in slipstreaming.
  • All good advice, especially:
    1. Don't 'cross' - wears it and you out
    2. Anticipation - on hill especially, try to anticipate and get down the gears (onto the smaller chainring, and onto sensible 'middle' rear sprocket) BEFORE you start to strain - you lose a lot of momentum if you find yourself on 50/28 then trying to change to 34/something as you're then trying to change back AND front at same time.
    3. Cadence - more spin less grunt equals a happier ride
    4. As a relative newbie also, I would endorse that a 50/34 and a 12-28 would be absolutely ideal.

    One thing to watch - there is OFTEN a limit to the 'tooth difference' your rear derailleur will handle. What I mean is that the 14-28 is quite low difference (14 obviously) whereas an 11-28 is therefore 17. Sometimes the RD will be designed for a diff of e.g. 16 teeth max. So, without knowing what RD you have hard to say but suggest you check. It may be at a 12-28 if OK, but an 11-28 not recommended, although you might get away with it. (Reason it can matter is that a larger tooth diff needs a longer chain and a 'long' RD hanger, whereas a lower diff uses a 'short' hanger.)
  • sorry for late response, not been at my computer this weekend.

    Wasn't aware of a minimum tooth difference, how would I find out what mine can take?
  • smidsy
    smidsy Posts: 5,273
    benthiss wrote:
    sorry for late response, not been at my computer this weekend.

    Wasn't aware of a minimum tooth difference, how would I find out what mine can take?

    http://techdocs.shimano.com/techdocs/index.jsp

    Find the model and then look at the pdf...all will be revealed.
    Yellow is the new Black.