Forum home Road cycling forum Road beginners

Changing an inner tube

doublem_1doublem_1 Posts: 266
edited March 2013 in Road beginners
I know that this is probably one of the most common questions asked among new cyclists. I have only ever changed one or two on my old mountain bike. I have a spare for one for if the time comes on my road bike, I have the levers as well. Is this all I need? What is the procedure for a road bike? :)
«1

Posts

  • smoggystevesmoggysteve Posts: 2,909
    This is my process using clinchers and folding tyres.

    Taking the old one is already off. I slightly inflate the new tube. Place it onto rim and tighten the valve nut to keep the tube still.
    Place new tyre onto rim and using thumbs only , push the tyre back onto the rim. Go along the whole tyre looking for any bumps or raised areas that could be the tube being nipped and then inflate to around 30 40 psi. Check again and loosen the valve nut slightly. Pump up to required pressure and check again. Tighten up bolt on valve. Done.

    P.s As there as different tyres and rims there is no 1 size fits all way.
  • doublem_1doublem_1 Posts: 266
    Thanks for the advice. I guess your right with the various different types of tyres out there. How do I get the old tyre off? How many levers do i need?
  • smoggystevesmoggysteve Posts: 2,909
    1 is all you need to remove a tyre.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    This is my process using clinchers and folding tyres.

    Taking the old one is already off. I slightly inflate the new tube. Place it onto rim and tighten the valve nut to keep the tube still.
    Place new tyre onto rim and using thumbs only , push the tyre back onto the rim. Go along the whole tyre looking for any bumps or raised areas that could be the tube being nipped and then inflate to around 30 40 psi. Check again and loosen the valve nut slightly. Pump up to required pressure and check again. Tighten up bolt on valve. Done.

    P.s As there as different tyres and rims there is no 1 size fits all way.

    That sounds odd. You put the tube on the bare rim first?
    How do you get the tyre onto the rim with the tube there?

    I would not do the valve retaining nut up (if it has one) until after the tyre is seated on rim.
    If the tube is slightly inflated and pulled tight against the rim it might stop the tyre seating properly around the valve hole area.
  • smoggystevesmoggysteve Posts: 2,909
    Yes, With a small amount of air in and the bolt holding it in place I can push a tyre over the tube without nipping it. I find it more practical then trying to put a tube in once the tyre is on. The air stops it getting nipped. I do loosen the nut off once the tyre is in place before I pump it up. I have done it this way for years and can change a tube from puncture to rolling again in around 5 minutes max so I must be doing something right.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    I don't get it, can you do a video ;-)
  • Mikey23Mikey23 Posts: 5,306
    Didn't get one for nearly a year then two in quick succession. Not very easy until you have done it a couple of times and always happens when it's cold, wet and your hands are freezing ...
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    I take disposable gloves out with me when its wet and mucky
    Was it two in same tyre on same ride?
  • smoggystevesmoggysteve Posts: 2,909
    Carbonator wrote:
    I don't get it, can you do a video ;-)

    Do you put the tyre on the rim and try to squeeze the tube in underneath the tyre? Explain how you do it before you criticise?

    It is not hard to push a folding tyre over a tube and rim without damaging the tube. Then you can fold it into the rim with your thumbs. If you cannot do this then use a lever but it still works the same, try it first before you question.
  • It does of course depend as SmoggySteve says on the type of tyre & rim.

    Sometimes you can simply get the inner on and the tyre over it or others you will have to fit the inner into the tyre and feed both onto the rim. No real right or wrong way to be honest, the main thing is to ensure you are not nipping the tyre & having the valve nut on but only to keep the tube in place is good practice as I find it helps to seat the tyre in the rim and keeps the tube away from rim around the valve just enough to stop and nipping or pinching. Then after a little more air is in and the clincher is seated correctly simple to tighten up the valve nut.
    Pain hurts much less if its topped off with beating your mates to top of a climb.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    Carbonator wrote:
    I don't get it, can you do a video ;-)

    Do you put the tyre on the rim and try to squeeze the tube in underneath the tyre? Explain how you do it before you criticise?

    It is not hard to push a folding tyre over a tube and rim without damaging the tube. Then you can fold it into the rim with your thumbs. If you cannot do this then use a lever but it still works the same, try it first before you question.

    I was not criticising, it just sounded odd. If its better then great.
    I cannot try until I understand what you mean though, hence the question.

    Yes, have always put tyre on first. Theres no real squeezing to get tube in though.
  • It's important to lose your temper just a little bit.
  • SpenderSpender Posts: 87
    When you are taking the back wheel out of the frame to change a tube you put the chain on the smallest cog. But which front chain ring do you put the chain on? Does it matter?
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    I tend to go small on the front but not smallest on the rear
  • Mikey23Mikey23 Posts: 5,306
    Yup losing temper, wingeing and sulking, reaching for the mobile to get missus to come and pick me up is all part of the experience... Oh and a why me pity party and trying to get the frail old lady passing by with her dog to do it for me in case my hands get dirty or I break a nail...
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,123
    Small front and small rear; means you're working with a bit less tension in the chain.

    Most importantly carefully check the inside of the tyre for sharp objects. No point in replacing the tube if you still have a thorn sticking through the tyre.

    I put one bead of the tyre on the rim (making sure the logo lines up with the valve hole :wink: ) then push the valve stem through the hole and feed the slightly inflated tube into the tyre. Then I ease the other bead onto the rim being very careful not to pinch the tube. Valve nut is discarded. (At home, not on the roadside before you start!)

    You'll obviously need a pump.

    I also carry a puncture kit in case I get more than one puncture on a ride. Contains 2 tyre levers; usually get away with using just one to remove a tyre.
  • BustacappBustacapp Posts: 971
    You don't need any tyre levers. Unless you are a fanny with girly hands.

    I actually learned something from this thread, and that is to use the valve nut thing to secure the inner tube to the rim. Because I find that often the area around the valve 'doesn't sit very well in the rim and can be a censored to keep lumpless when pumping the tyre up!!

    :edit: there is an excellent vid on here showing how to change inner tube without levers somewhere.
  • CiBCiB Posts: 6,098
    The best thing to do with the valve nut is to carefully unscrew it from the new tube, gently make your way to the nearest bin and drop it in. Valve nuts have no use or benefit.

    How to fit a tube?

    Check the rim, rim tape & tyre are clean & free of pointy sharp objects. Fit the tyre to the rim on one side only, ideally with the manufacturer label / logo at the valve hole. Inflate the tube so that it's about the same diameter as the wheel, slot the valve in then run it round the rim under the tyre that's half on. Start fitting the tyre at the valve - slip it over the rim, push the valve up so that the tyre can seat properly without being fouled by the valve, then work round asymmetrically so that you end up with the last bit of the tyre to slip over at about the 3 o'clock position. Why? Despite advice above about not needing levers or just easing the tyre over for the last bit, there are some chuffing tight fitting tyre & wheel combinations. If you're trying to get an obstinate tyre on you can eke out another mill or so by pinching the beads of the tyre opposite the last bit into the well of the rim. You can't do that if you're opposite the valve; you may not have to though.

    Ease the last bit of the tyre on with girls' fingers, man hands or tyre levers and then work round on both sides eyeballing it to check that it's seated properly all the way, then half inflate it and spin the wheel in front of your face to see that it's still evenly & properly located in the rim. You don't want to put 120psi in it then spot that it's popped out of the rim an dis about to go bang.

    Once you're happy with it blow it up to your desired pressure. And leave the nut in the bin - it has no place or use on a nice bike.
  • mhj999mhj999 Posts: 122
    slightly inflate the new tube in the tyre, then fit tyre on rim, starting at valve hole, trying not using levers, then get the CO2 out - easiest way that i have found. Don't forget to line up your decals/logos!
    Sensa Giulia 105
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    edited January 2013
    CiB wrote:
    The best thing to do with the valve nut is to carefully unscrew it from the new tube, gently make your way to the nearest bin and drop it in. Valve nuts have no use or benefit.

    How to fit a tube?...........

    That's exactly how I do it (did not copy everything as its 2 posts up ;-) )

    Glad its not just me that thinks the nut should not be on there and the valve pushed up into the tyre when the tyre is fitted around the valve hole :wink:

    Friend of mine mentioned a tyre bulge as we were nearing the end of a ride. He thought his tyre had had it, but as it was around the valve hole I suggested he deflate the tyre, push the valve up, push tyre in to rim and re-inflate. He text me when he got in to confirm that had sorted it.

    Another point is that as the rim diameter is at its smallest at the centre of the rim, its easier to pull over the last bit by hand if you position the edge of tyre away from the rim a bit and kind of stretch it out, if that makes sense?

    If anyone has any links to videos of either of the other 2 ways that have been mentioned, I would love to see them.
  • smoggystevesmoggysteve Posts: 2,909
    Carbonator wrote:
    CiB wrote:
    The best thing to do with the valve nut is to carefully unscrew it from the new tube, gently make your way to the nearest bin and drop it in. Valve nuts have no use or benefit.

    How to fit a tube?...........

    That's exactly how I do it (did not copy everything as its 2 posts up ;-)

    Glad its not just me that thinks the nut should not be on there and the valve pushed up when the tyre is fitted :wink:

    Mmmm, Yeah you are probably right. I'm sure all those innertube manufacturers have got it completely wrong. Spending millions in R&D only to go and do something like put a completely useless item on their product for absolutely no reason. Boy, I bet they feel stupid.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    Carbonator wrote:
    CiB wrote:
    The best thing to do with the valve nut is to carefully unscrew it from the new tube, gently make your way to the nearest bin and drop it in. Valve nuts have no use or benefit.

    How to fit a tube?...........

    That's exactly how I do it (did not copy everything as its 2 posts up ;-)

    Glad its not just me that thinks the nut should not be on there and the valve pushed up when the tyre is fitted :wink:

    Mmmm, Yeah you are probably right. I'm sure all those innertube manufacturers have got it completely wrong. Spending millions in R&D only to go and do something like put a completely useless item on their product for absolutely no reason. Boy, I bet they feel stupid.

    I did not say it was useless. I said it should not be done up when tyre was fitted.
    That said I have no idea what it is for. It does not seem to do much apart from add weight to me.

    My tubes do not have a thread or nut anyway.
  • smoggystevesmoggysteve Posts: 2,909
    If anyone who uses extra long valves has ever had one snap on them while using a mini pump the bolt can help stop that happening, also when trying to push the pump onto the valve it stops it receding back into the rim which can tear the valve on the seal if you are not careful. Doing this in a nice warm garage or basement may not be a problem but when you are miles from home and its hammering it down, or in the middle of a race it can be a god send.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    If I am pumping up from flat I generally push down on tyre/tube when connecting pump.
    OK though, now I can see how it can help when pushing a pump onto a partially inflated tube where thats not possible.
    Thats worth bearing in mind, especially as mine do not have threads/nuts and I often top up the pressure when in a bit of a rush to get out.
    Same thing when using valve extenders as there is no thread/nut option.
    I was thinking I could have had shorter extensions, but now I am glad I have a bit to hold onto when attaching pump :wink:
    I am not having a go. Its a forum and its worth hearing how other people do things.
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,123
    The valve nuts looked OK on an old skool low profile rim where they could sit flush, but a bit odd on something like my asymmetric, slightly aero deeper section rear RS10.

    And they serve no useful purpose, so I chuck them away. The dust caps I think are useful only while the tube sits in my seat pack; they prevent the end of the valve rubbing a hole elsewhere in the tube. Once the tube is installed, the dust cap goes too.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    keef66 wrote:
    The dust caps I think are useful only while the tube sits in my seat pack; they prevent the end of the valve rubbing a hole elsewhere in the tube. Once the tube is installed, the dust cap goes too.

    If they are nice yellow Continental ones, can you send them to me :D
  • Let the man with high pants show you

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BmNo6rFKMzE

    and instead of levers have a lever

    an dif changing back wheel put chain on smallest cog, makes it easier to slip wheel on an doff.

    brought to you by "crevaisons sont de la censored " :lol::D:cry: :?
    The dissenter is every human being at those moments of his life when he resigns
    momentarily from the herd and thinks for himself.
  • CiBCiB Posts: 6,098
    [Mmmm, Yeah you are probably right. I'm sure all those innertube manufacturers have got it completely wrong. Spending millions in R&D only to go and do something like put a completely useless item on their product for absolutely no reason. Boy, I bet they feel stupid.
    Millions in r&d to invent a thread? Yeah right. Perpetuating the myth that the nut is a necessary part? A chance to sell us something we don't need but which adds to the total cost /profit of the item? Just force of habit that that's how inner tubes are, cos they've always been that way?

    Most tubes I've seen lately have a smooth shank anyway. What are they thinking of? How can that possibly work?
  • smoggystevesmoggysteve Posts: 2,909
    CiB wrote:
    [Mmmm, Yeah you are probably right. I'm sure all those innertube manufacturers have got it completely wrong. Spending millions in R&D only to go and do something like put a completely useless item on their product for absolutely no reason. Boy, I bet they feel stupid.
    Millions in r&d to invent a thread? Yeah right. Perpetuating the myth that the nut is a necessary part? A chance to sell us something we don't need but which adds to the total cost /profit of the item? Just force of habit that that's how inner tubes are, cos they've always been that way?

    Most tubes I've seen lately have a smooth shank anyway. What are they thinking of? How can that possibly work?

    You know I don't mean that amount of money just on a valve but as a complete product. But if you are that narrow minded I will explain.

    They serve a purpose to some people even if not for you. I am sure that if they were not required it would be something they would remove as it costs more to machine a thread onto a valve and make a nut than leave it smooth. If you really think that its some sort of conspiracy to get more money out of us then i pity you for your paranoia. Some have them, some don't. Its called consumer choice.
  • The best way to practice this is arrange to have a flat during a club run just as you are about to leave the cafe. That way you get a bunch of experts standing around offering you (typically contradictory) advice and complaining about how long you are taking but making no effort to actually help!

    If you are wondering why you may want to line your tyre logo up with the valve hole.. Well one it looks nice and two if you can locate the puncture in the tube it makes it easier to work out where to look on the tyre for possible damage.

    Oh and on the tyre nut thing. I tend to do them up but after I've fitted the tyre, personally I find that if you do them up before it is harder to get the tyre to seat well around the valve.
Sign In or Register to comment.