Shorter Stem to Compensate Longer Reach Handle Bar?

udinesedphm
udinesedphm Posts: 8
edited January 2013 in Road buying advice
hi,

I'd just fitted ControlTech Carbon Comp handlebar 80mm reach, which is about 30/25cm Reach increase from my old handle bar....currrently using 90mm Stem....

So would getting a shorter Stem e.g 70mm or 80mm fix the problem...

now i had to move my Saddle forward a bit..to get a better feel
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Comments

  • Instead of asking why you fitted a set of bars that made your fit more uncomfortable I will just say fit a smaller stem to compensate for it.

    There are no rules you can do to your bike what you want and if it makes it more comfortable then just do it.
  • Beware using short stems. I tried using a shorter stem, both 70 & 80mm but found the handling was very tricksy, & did not fill me with confidence on descents & when cornering. This was all brought about by having a frame that was slightly too big. I just stuck with a 90mm & it wasn't so bad, but on long rides i did get some discomfort & pain in the neck & shoulders. Just something to think about.
  • ShutUpLegs
    ShutUpLegs Posts: 3,522
    Not sure moving your saddle forward to compensate for reach is a good idea
  • lucasf09
    lucasf09 Posts: 160
    I currently use a 40mm stem and although the handling was twitchy at first as nunowoolmez mentioned, I have learned to love it.
  • napoleond
    napoleond Posts: 5,992
    Never adjust saddle to compensate from the front end. Bad decision on the bars. I use the Deda RHM bars as it allows me to use a longer stem and they are very comfortable in use...
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  • passout
    passout Posts: 4,425
    RE stem:

    I come from an MTB (XC) background and use a 60mm stem on those bikes. In my mind short stems make for a more responsive handling - I wouldn't go above 90mm.

    On road the situation is obviously a bit different but personally I'd still happily go down to 80mm and not expect to have any handling problems at all. I run 90mm on my road bikes at the mo.

    A lot of this boils down to preference & what you are used to.

    RE bars:

    Agree with Nap. D. if I'm honest. I might just stick the old ones back on or get some 'smaller' ones...?
    'Happiness serves hardly any other purpose than to make unhappiness possible' Marcel Proust.
  • Grill
    Grill Posts: 5,610
    lucasf09 wrote:
    I currently use a 40mm stem and although the handling was twitchy at first as nunowoolmez mentioned, I have learned to love it.

    I assume that this isn't on any sort of real road bike...
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • Grill wrote:
    lucasf09 wrote:
    I currently use a 40mm stem and although the handling was twitchy at first as nunowoolmez mentioned, I have learned to love it.

    I assume that this isn't on any sort of real road bike...

    Yeah god forbid eh!

    What would happen if someone saw it? or even worse saw you riding it? OMG you would be struck down in an instant.

    Get the thing changed and suffer for your sport you fool! :twisted:
  • on-yer-bike
    on-yer-bike Posts: 2,974
    If one assumes most riding is done on the hoods, does it make any difference to the steering how the distance from the headtube to the hoods is made? ie longer stem with shorter bars or shorter stem with longer bars?
    The saddle position is related to the BB and upper leg length not the handle bars.
    Pegoretti
    Colnago
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  • Grill
    Grill Posts: 5,610
    If one assumes most riding is done on the hoods, does it make any difference to the steering how the distance from the headtube to the hoods is made? ie longer stem with shorter bars or shorter stem with longer bars?
    The saddle position is related to the BB and upper leg length not the handle bars.

    Absolutely. I can tell the difference between 100mm and 110mm. Obviously when you're not turning there's less impact on overall feel, but for me it's still noticeable.
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    If one assumes most riding is done on the hoods, does it make any difference to the steering how the distance from the headtube to the hoods is made? ie longer stem with shorter bars or shorter stem with longer bars?
    The saddle position is related to the BB and upper leg length not the handle bars.

    I was thinking the very same thing. Stem and bars are clamped firmly together, so what really matters is the overall distance from the headtube to the contact points surely? Short stem + long reach bars should be the same as long stem / short reach bars from a mechanical point of view?
  • neeb
    neeb Posts: 4,470
    Grill wrote:
    If one assumes most riding is done on the hoods, does it make any difference to the steering how the distance from the headtube to the hoods is made? ie longer stem with shorter bars or shorter stem with longer bars?
    The saddle position is related to the BB and upper leg length not the handle bars.

    Absolutely. I can tell the difference between 100mm and 110mm. Obviously when you're not turning there's less impact on overall feel, but for me it's still noticeable.
    on-yer-bike is right, it shouldn't make a difference most of the time as long as the distance from the headtube to the levers is the same. It will make a difference if you are riding holding the top of the bars before the bend to the hoods, and possibly (and much more importantly) in the drops, but that will depend on the reach of the drops. If the reach is sufficiently longer than the old bars to make up for the difference in stem length, it won't feel any different.

    Imagine a one-piece carbon stem and bar combo - would it make any difference how long the stem part was before it flared out to the bars, as long as the reach to the drops was the same? Of course not.
  • Grill
    Grill Posts: 5,610
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • Grill wrote:

    So now I know...never use scissors, a wheelbarrow or a shovel instead of handlebars

    thanks
  • Grill
    Grill Posts: 5,610
    Always happy to help.
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • passout
    passout Posts: 4,425
    In response to the discussion above, I think stem length does matter a bit because it offers a roomier cockpit. If you stem was 'really' short you may end up banging your knees on the bar when climbing out of the saddle - depending on frame size etc. A stem is also a way of controlling bar height of course - angle and length will be relevant there.
    'Happiness serves hardly any other purpose than to make unhappiness possible' Marcel Proust.
  • neeb
    neeb Posts: 4,470
    Grill wrote:
    Quite.. And in this case (when you have your hands on the hoods), the fulcrum is the headtube/steerer and the lever(s), in effect, is an invisible line between the hood and the headtube. It doesn't matter how the bar/stem combination twists and turns between these points.
  • neeb
    neeb Posts: 4,470
    passout wrote:
    In response to the discussion above, I think stem length does matter a bit because it offers a roomier cockpit. If you stem was 'really' short you may end up banging your knees on the bar when climbing out of the saddle - depending on frame size etc. A stem is also a way of controlling bar height of course - angle and length will be relevant there.
    Yes, if your stem slopes up and your bars slope down, the steering could feel slightly different if it places the hoods in a lower position (but the same distance from the headtube) compared to a longer stem and shorter reach bar.
  • Ben6899
    Ben6899 Posts: 9,686
    NapoleonD wrote:
    Never adjust saddle to compensate from the front end. Bad decision on the bars. I use the Deda RHM bars as it allows me to use a longer stem and they are very comfortable in use...

    This is why I use Ritchey WCS Classics.
    Ben

    Bikes: Donhou DSS4 Custom | Condor Italia RC | Gios Megalite | Dolan Preffisio | Giant Bowery '76
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ben_h_ppcc/
    Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/143173475@N05/
  • smidsy
    smidsy Posts: 5,273
    Ben6899 wrote:
    NapoleonD wrote:
    Never adjust saddle to compensate from the front end. Bad decision on the bars. I use the Deda RHM bars as it allows me to use a longer stem and they are very comfortable in use...

    This is why I use Ritchey WCS Classics.

    What is?
    Yellow is the new Black.
  • Grill
    Grill Posts: 5,610
    neeb wrote:
    passout wrote:
    In response to the discussion above, I think stem length does matter a bit because it offers a roomier cockpit. If you stem was 'really' short you may end up banging your knees on the bar when climbing out of the saddle - depending on frame size etc. A stem is also a way of controlling bar height of course - angle and length will be relevant there.
    Yes, if your stem slopes up and your bars slope down, the steering could feel slightly different if it places the hoods in a lower position (but the same distance from the headtube) compared to a longer stem and shorter reach bar.

    Caster FTW.
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • Ben6899
    Ben6899 Posts: 9,686
    smidsy wrote:
    Ben6899 wrote:
    NapoleonD wrote:
    Never adjust saddle to compensate from the front end. Bad decision on the bars. I use the Deda RHM bars as it allows me to use a longer stem and they are very comfortable in use...

    This is why I use Ritchey WCS Classics.

    What is?

    I find them very comfortable. That's the most important factor when choosing bars.
    Ben

    Bikes: Donhou DSS4 Custom | Condor Italia RC | Gios Megalite | Dolan Preffisio | Giant Bowery '76
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ben_h_ppcc/
    Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/143173475@N05/
  • smidsy
    smidsy Posts: 5,273
    Right got it.

    I too have the Ritchey WCS Classics on the Basso, yes they are very comfortable :-)

    8391776145_2d573be0a3_z_d.jpg
    Yellow is the new Black.
  • Ben6899
    Ben6899 Posts: 9,686
    smidsy wrote:
    Right got it.

    I too have the Ritchey WCS Classics on the Basso, yes they are very comfortable :-)

    Nice. I have them on my Dolan winter bike and I will be specifying them on my next Sunday best build.
    Ben

    Bikes: Donhou DSS4 Custom | Condor Italia RC | Gios Megalite | Dolan Preffisio | Giant Bowery '76
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ben_h_ppcc/
    Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/143173475@N05/